Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$5.49
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by 2swellguys
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Previously loved and 100% satisfaction guaranteed. Item may show significant wear, library markings, noticeable creases, scuffs, bends, or small tears, inscriptions, notes/highlights, spots, or yellowing. Dust jacket may be missing
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Little House in the Ozarks (Laura Ingalls Wilder Family Series) Hardcover – September, 1996

4.6 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, September, 1996
$70.88 $0.01

Get a FREE Amazon Echo with homework help
Choose from 40+ subjects with online tutors from The Princeton Review. Learn more
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Laura Ingalls Wilder Family Series
  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Galahad Books; 1st Galahad Books Ed edition (September 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0883659689
  • ISBN-13: 978-0883659687
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 8.1 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #679,883 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is NOT a children's book and should not be listed at the reading level "ages 9 - 12". Years before Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote the Little House series about her childhood last century, she was a pioneer journalist, writing regular newspaper columns that provided commentary on everyday life in America. The columns, which ran from 1911-1925, discuss a variety of topics - from women & politics to the role of the mother in a home, from having a family motto to the effect of the end of WW1 on ordinary people, and through them all she exhibits a special insight and wisdom. This is a delightful collection that affords us the opportunity to see another side of Laura, in a career which she enjoyed for many years before she penned those famous novels of her childhood.
Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Well, first her and Almonzo moved away from their home to Florida on doctor's orders for Almonzo. The climate was too
cold. Then the heat of Florida caused Laura's health to suffer so they had to find a "happy medium" climate and they set off with their horses and buggy (and little Rose) to find a new home. They ended up in Missouri and were happy there the rest of their lives on their farm named Rocky Ridge.
However, this book doesn't tell that story. It only mentions parts of it in passing. This is a collection
of newspaper articles written by Laura when she was an old married woman with her child already grown and moved on. It covers about eight years. The last article in the book mentions that Ma passed away. The kids were very bored by it as any kid would be reading a newspaper article and I had to stop reading it to them. I enjoyed it very much as I felt like I really got to know Laura this year through reading her entire series.
This book teaches Many, Many things about how to live
a farm life. One of the most interesting things was how to make a refrigerator for milk and butter without electricity or ice. There are many amusing stories about the different families and people that lived around the Wilder's. For example: one day there was hail the size of golf balls and a neighbor went out his front door to get one and bring it in the house to show everybody. Well, no sooner does he get out but one hits him on the head and knocks him out cold. His family had to drag him by the feet back in the front door. (he was O.K.) There are stories about children and parents and farm hands and for all the stories the purpose is for Laura to give her opinions and philosophies.
Read more ›
Comment 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a collection of newspaper articles Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote about life in the Ozarks. Many of the articles are full insights into life that still apply today. She wrote about farmer's wives being equal in importance to their husbands, the frustration of dealing with "new technology" (in her case a new washing machine), and many other day to day activities on the farm.
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As a fan of the Little House books, I've read Laura's stories many times. But before she wrote them, she wrote for the newspapers about farm life. This gives such an exciting peak at her adult life, her "what happened next" years, that any true fan should read it.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Since I am currently reading the Little House book series with my children, I was delighted to come across this book in the library. Now I want a copy for myself! Laura speaks with gentleness and insight about human nature and the universal concerns that are timeless. It's an extremely satisfying read because this is the voice of the "grown-up Laura".
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Laura Ingalls' writing for adults, through a newspaper column she did weekly from 1911-1925, is highly amusing, and very thought-provoking for those of us living now in Psychobabble, Let It All Hang Out, Complain and Whine and Blame and Brood California.
Her advice is to simply refrain from even commenting on one's troubles, and avoid thinking about the negative things, the things one can't do anything about.
Try to be positive, try to see that work is necessary, and don't avoid one's job and chores, or you make yourself more miserable.
ARe these the commonsense things that today's adults or children ever hear, outside of a church sermon or Reader's Digest?
It reminds me of my early days in Germany, when slowly the meaning of the old folksongs began to penetrate as I learned the German vocabulary. I'd heard them, hummed with them, and played the kazoo and danced to them; but when I finally understood the lyrics, I realized what a completely different time and place they came from. They encourage people to stand up and enjoy their lives, the chance to walk in the flowers of springtime, to make friends, to have a drink with colleagues or family, to see one's beloved again, and to rejoice that God made you at all.
When I met older Germans, they seemed often to still embody such positive efforts and mentality, in contrast to the American-like cynicism of the young.
This will strike you - assuming you are an adult reading this - when you read Laura Ingalls' columns. I don't know what children would think, but I think they'd like them. They're straight and honest and true, just as she advises us to be.
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews