Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Living Without God: New D... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The item shows wear from consistent use, but it remains in good condition and works perfectly. All pages and cover are intact (including the dust cover, if applicable). Spine may show signs of wear. Pages may include limited notes and highlighting. May include "From the library of" labels.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Living Without God: New Directions for Atheists, Agnostics, Secularists, and the Undecided Paperback – August 18, 2009

3.8 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.95
$7.18 $0.01

Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Wiley Summer Savings Event.
Save up to 40% during Wiley's Summer Savings Event. Learn more.
$15.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Living Without God: New Directions for Atheists, Agnostics, Secularists, and the Undecided
  • +
  • The Atheist's Way: Living Well Without Gods
Total price: $30.95
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review


"Ronald Aronson demonstrates that atheism represents much more than what one does not believe: that it is the precondition for a generous humanism.
The two closing chapters are models of stoicism at its best." —Christopher
Hitchens, author of God is Not Great

“As a Christian I applaud my Brother Ronald Aronson for his powerful defense of a courageous and compassionate secular worldview. He is a religiously musical atheist I admire!” —Cornel West

"This book is not just for non-believers. All of us are 'living without God'—at least a loving, personal God. Aronson just shows us how to do it with courage and panache." —Barbara Ehrenreich

“[Living Without God] brooks no argument with religion as religion, but it challenges how the religious right has warped our politics in recent times.” —Detroit Metro Times

“A first rate humanist scholar, [Aronson is] intent on showing we don’t need belief in god, or in Progress, the Enlightment substitute, to see us through.” —Naturalism.org
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Counterpoint; Reprint edition (August 18, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582435308
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582435305
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,647,765 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I just finished reading this book, and it's terrific. It goes beyond the debunking of religion books to discuss how we go about understanding the world and society, and our place in both without the use of religious references, explanations and thought processes. It presents a very positive and liberating view of a truly secular worldview - a better world. I highly recommend it to those who liked the debunking books, and also to those with religious beliefs who recognize the need for and benefits of a humanistic/secular society.
5 Comments 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I almost seriously misjudged this book. From the title I expected a rather different book; and when I realized that the author was planning to tell us about his ideas of how to live without god but included seemingly no awareness of previous work (for example that of Paul Kurtz, who's not mentioned anywhere), I found myself significantly discouraged. Then, too, the author's style of presenting a set of observations and then seemingly to refute them with another set, along with his tendency to want to "see all aspects" of an issue, can create some confusion and at times become quite tedious.
Fortunately for me, I persisted, and gradually I began to appreciate Aronson's dedication to investigating issues and questions that deepen and widen one's understandings, especially of how a life of meaning can be created via greater awareness of appropriate gratitude for the struggles and achievements of forebears of all kinds (including major philosophers) and the responsibilities (if we chose to accept them) toward those forebears (and their current-day offspring) in being a part of the continuing work of making possible advancement for all human life--without expecting god to do it for us.
If that is a part of why you might buy this book, it's an excellent purchase.
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Something unprecedented happened in American publishing in the last four years. Books explicitly advocating atheism became bestsellers. It happened despite (or because of) the theocratic drift in our politics. In 2005, Wayne State University professor Ronald Aronson called the authors of such books "New Atheists," and the label stuck. Most notable among them have been Sam Harris (who had previously been an obscure neurology grad student), evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, philosopher Daniel Dennett, and political journalist Christopher Hitchens. Aronson included some other writers -- Michel Onfray, Julian Baggini, Erik Wielenberg, and Daniel Harbour -- whose books have sold less well.

Aronson now in his own book, Living Without God, welcomes the emergence of the New Atheists. He values their accomplishment, but emphasizes that more work needs to be done. They have succeeded in "breaking the spell" (to use a phrase applied very aptly in this context by Dennett) which in the USA had hindered skeptical discussion of religion for the past generation. But according to Aronson (p.16), "even after reading Harris, Dennett, Dawkins or Hitchens, secularists often have difficulty discussing what it is we [do] believe in, if not God."

He points out that this task is even more difficult for secularists nowadays than for their 19th- and early-20th-century predecessors. The earlier secularists could wave the Enlightenment banner of Progress; but meanwhile the world wars, genocides, and gulags have, for many of us, shredded that banner to tatters. Aronson describes as follows our spiritual predicament today (p.
Read more ›
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a Christian minister, I read this book looking for an understanding of secular humanism., and I found that the author does a fine job of articulating a philosophy of life without reference to God. Most of the other atheists/agnostics I have read are so busy attacking fundamentalism that they spend no effort to develop a positive philosophy of their own. Professor Aronson begins by addressing the question of how to be thankful without a religious world view. He properly recognizes that life without thankfulness loses much of its richness and joy. He also addresses how to be moral, how to face death, and how to find hope in times of struggle. He has the most difficulty with the issue of hope, saying that we find hope in a blind determination to keep going. To me, he seems to be saying that if you are strong enough to find hope in times of heartache and despair, then you will be okay, but if not, too bad. His philosophy, therefore, is only for the strong. The Christian Faith, however, can work both for persons who are weak and for persons who are strong. The strong find challenges that stretch them to their limits, and the weak find compassion and love to help them overcome challenges that would be beyond them. In any event, Living Without God is a thoughtful, honest, and well-written book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Aronson does a tremendous job trying to tackle the question of living in a world without god. He works along the viewpoint that "Living without God means not simply rejecting God, but asking and answering vital existential questions still at the heart of today's religions." So, unlike other writers (Hitchens, Dawkins, Harris, etc) he doesn't seek to methodically dismantle religion (though he does criticize its impact on free thinking), but rather seeks to provide a means of how to think about life. His approach is basically a variant of humanism, looking not to replace religion but give "a more or less coherent picture of our world and our place within it." The assumption is that if people willfully seek to understand this complex process, they can hope to live without needing God. That said, the book is divided into 8 chapters covering topics such as gratitude to personal responsibility to thoughts on death and Aronson does a good job trying to cover such complex themes and philosophical questions.

I took off two stars because Aronson has a habit of rambling to an annoying level. He has so many anecdotes that he ceases to make clear points. He also leaves no doubts about his political leanings, which I can understand, but this is a book about living without God, meaning he should stick to his subject matter and not try to tackle current politically controversial issues. He also makes some pretty serious assumptions, such as seeing a correlation between responsibility and religion as a cause and effect relationship.

Still, it was a noble effort and I'm glad I finished it. I hope there will be more authors that can take up the mantle and move beyond criticizing religion to some constructive means of guiding people on their own journey towards the truth.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Living Without God: New Directions for Atheists, Agnostics, Secularists, and the Undecided
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Living Without God: New Directions for Atheists, Agnostics, Secularists, and the Undecided