Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy New
$12.99
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Lone Star Planet has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lone Star Planet Paperback – May 19, 2013

4.3 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

See all 22 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, May 19, 2013
$12.99
$12.99 $87.04

Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for the Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$12.99 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Lone Star Planet
  • +
  • Uller Uprising
  • +
  • Space Viking
Total price: $40.93
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Henry Beam Piper was an American science fiction author. He wrote many short stories and several novels. He is best known for his extensive Terro-Human Future History series of stories and a shorter series of "Paratime" alternate history tales. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 78 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 19, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1456498517
  • ISBN-13: 978-1456498511
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,460,666 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
...

Originally published as A PLANET FOR TEXANS in the magazine FANTASTIC UNIVERSE (Vol. 7, No. 3, March 1957), this novella was expanded by John J. McGuire and published as a short novel in 1958.

This work is a clear and obvious tribute to H.L. Mencken's classic essay "The Malevolent Jobholder" (from THE AMERICAN MERCURY, June 1924), in which Mencken proposed:

"...that it shall be no longer malum in se for a citizen to pummel, cowhide, kick, gouge, cut, wound, bruise, maim, burn, club, bastinado, flay, or even lynch a [government] jobholder, and that it shall be malum prohibitum only to the extent that the punishment exceeds the jobholder's deserts. The amount of this excess, if any, may be determined very conveniently by a petit jury, as other questions of guilt are now determined."

In 1999, the novel won the Prometheus Award, Hall of Fame Award for Best Classic Libertarian SF Novel. This tongue-in-cheek tale features a planet of Texans whose dinosaur-sized cattle have to be herded with tanks and helicopers, and whose system of government derives its character from Mencken's essay.

The protagonist is an insubordinate Terran junior diplomat who is appointed as ambassador to this cantankerously independent planet in the hope that he will be assassinated (as the previous ambassador had been), thereby justifying the forcible invasion and conquest of the Texans. The crux of the story is the trial of the previous ambassador's assassins - actually paid killers hired by an alien empire also planning invasion - under a legal system that considers the killing of a practicing politician to be justifiable homicide.

An interesting premise, carried out with typical '50s-style space opera ingenuity and light-hearted disrespect for government authority.

--
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This relatively short story from the late H. Beam Piper features the great State of Texas, projected into the future as an entire world, complete with ranchers, Texas Rangers, and super-sized EVERYTHING. Only the oil is missing from this enthusiastic projection. The story revolves around a new Solar League Ambassador to the world of New Texas, as he tries to deal with the murder of his immediate predecessor. The Solar League government is very unhappy with this murder, which it suspects might be associated with aggressive near-by canine-like aliens. The League is very willing to protect New Texas and NEEDS the planet to join the League so they can do just that, however due to their unique 'kill-the-politician' political accountability system, the New Texas government is unable to agree to becoming a League member. The story thus revolves around how Ambassador Silk can work around this self-protecting political unwillingness, and ultimately takes the form of a key New Texas courtroom battle. The leadership of the Solar League has also found another, quite sinister way to resolve this issue, for no-one would blame them for a 'justified conquest' of New Texas if a second one of their Ambassadors was murdered - as Ambassador Silk well knows, since in an earlier academic journal opinion article he had suggested that method himself! Good drama, action, political intrigue, a bit of romance, and brilliant courtroom action, with a very satisfying ending. Recommended reading!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Classic H. Beam Piper. Classic 50's SF. Easy read. The plot involves Terran diplomat goes to the Planet of New Texas to replace a murdered ambassador. No mystery involved. I like reading the oldies, but if you really like this kind of plot read any of Keith Laumer's "Retief" stories, or and of Poul Anderson's "Flandry " stories.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
1. Short review: :-)

2. Long review:

2.1. What I liked: Piper's satire.

Roller-coaster or walk-in-the-park? It tries to be a roller coaster, but most of the action happens in a courtroom, so it is a walk in the park threatening to become a roller coaster.

Free and worth the download.

2.2. What I did not like: Nothing. Once I got into the over-the-top satire, it was all good.

2.3. Who I think is the audience: Science fiction fans. H Beam Piper fans.

2.4. Is the book appropriate for children to read? Yes. There is killing, but it is not graphic.

2.5. On the basis of reading this book, will I buy the author's next book? Yes.

2.6. The plot in a nutshell:

Stephen Silk, one of the Solar League's spies, finds himself appointed the Ambassador to New Texas to fill the vacancy left by the late Silas Cumshaw. Some inhabitants of New Texas killed Ambassador Cumshaw. Silk is to investigate Cumshaw's death and determine if the aggressive z'Srauff -- whom the Solar League suspects of planning to invade New Texas -- had a part in the murder. It becomes apparent to Silk that many who sought his appointment hope that this will get him killed, too.

During his journey to New Texas, Silk familiarizes himself with the local political situation, with his personnel, and with the side-arms the League provided him. On New Texas, everyone goes armed.

Soon after his arrival on New Texas, Silk finds himself locked in the Court of Political Justice. "[T]he defendant, Wilbur Whately, is here charged with political irresponsibility and excessive atrocity in exercising his constitutional right of criticism of a practicing politician." The defendant killed S.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews