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The Lords Of Creation Audio, Cassette – October 29, 1990

4.7 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Audio, Cassette, October 29, 1990

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12 1.5-hour cassettes

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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Books on Tape, Inc. (October 29, 1990)
  • ISBN-10: 0736618635
  • ISBN-13: 978-0736618632
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #14,036,099 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Melissa K. Bear on October 21, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A detailed account of the financial expansion in the U.S. from the 1890's up to the Depression. In spite of the complexities of this subject Allen manages to make it understandable and interesting. There are so many similarities to what is happening in our country today that it should be a must read for everyone. I'll be saving this one for future reading and reference. Allen was such a gifted historical writer, if you have any interest in this period of time in American history then read all of Allen's books, you won't be disappointed.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
An easy-to-read, yet comprehensive, overview of the vast expansion of corporations and finance in the US between the 1890’s and the 1930’s. There are fascinating vignettes of selected “captains of industry and finance”, many of whom were born into poverty but had the skill and the drive to learn the financial tricks and became billionaires. Financial malpractice was egregious and rampant and lead directly and repeatedly to economic crises. Lessons learned, if any, were soon forgotten or ignored. Today, in 2014, one can see the same self-serving financial greed in action. Excessive speculation in dubious financial instruments follows a pattern similar to the excesses of the 1920’s.
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Format: Kindle Edition
NYU Media Studies Professor, Mark Crispin Miller, has stumbled upon a potential landmine for Wall Street. In conjunction with Open Road Media, Miller has unearthed and is bringing back to life important vanished books under the imprint “Forbidden Bookshelf.” One of those books is The Lords of Creation: The History of America’s 1 Percent by Frederick Lewis Allen.

The only thing to change about the book is a new forward by Miller and an introduction by business writer, Gretchen Morgenson, of the New York Times. And, of course, that second half of the title has been added. In 1935 when the book was originally published, Wall Streeters were still called banksters. We can thank Occupy Wall Street for successfully marketing the 1 percent brand.
[...]
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I started reading this book because I've heard that economic conditions are very similar right now to those that preceded the famous Wall St. crash of 1929. It's disgusting to note that many of the names that figured prominently in sending the nation into the chaos of the Great Depression are the EXACT same names that are setting us up to fall down again. This book was written a long time ago, so the style seems a bit stilted or stuffy (hence a 4 out of 5), and I don't have patience for long lists of people long dead who should have died in jail for what they did. As a scholarly work, it is above reproach...the research cites a variety of sources, and all conclusions are very well supported by documentation. It is exhausting to read, but it is also a very thorough indictment of the types of ethical and moral compromises invented by a group of business leaders who thought they were entitled to parasitize the American working public.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is full with information and is brilliantly written. A little difficult read at times.
There is a way to generate income by creating a real value. It takes effort and talent and imagination and inspiration. Much more effective, quicker and powerful way to enrichment is by plundering or stealing from someone who creates a real value. It worked this way since before Roman times. You can check Tacitus: "Annals". The model Morgan applied: to borrow from the public and then let the expanding industry pay off his debt and generate profit was exhausted when the railroad and metal industry reached high noon. So this book takes us to the dawn of the Military Industrial Complex, when Big Money experienced a spike in profits due to the First World War, feeding the carnage in Europe. This model works well.
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Format: Paperback
In an interview just before the release[this Dec.29] of his already highly praised book "The Lords of Finance:The Bankers Who Broke the World[1914-1944]",Liaquat Ahmed said: "The Great Depression was largely caused by the failure of intellectual will--the men in charge simply did not understand how the economy worked. The risk this time is that a failure of political will, will lead us into an economic catastrophe."

That is now,but this is then: Frederick Allen,1890-1954,was there,then, when he wrote "The Lords of Creation"[1935],"a history of the evolution of financial power in the United States since 1900"[hardback jacket].

Bubbles burst...In Allen's book, orderly mass production is shown to have begun in the mind of the likes of John Pierpont Morgan in 1900-1902 when Henry Ford was producing only 400 cars a year. Even in 1901,during the Northern Pacific[RR] Panic,the New York Times editorialized about the panic as: "an exhibition of the use of vast power for private ends unrestrained by any sense of public responsibility" with contending Wall Street groups acting "...like cowboys on a spree...shooting wildly at each other in entire disregard for the safety of the bystanders".

At about this time[1901]Morgan formed the world's largest corporation, including a heavily-capitalized holding company--the chief engine of 1901's and 2009's financial power. The business man's president,McKinley,was shot in 1901 and the progressive Teddy Roosevelt assumed new presidential powers of market regulation,but with caution so as to not "kill the goose", but, as the comic politico "Mr. Dooley" said: "Th' trusts..are heejous monsthers built up to be th' enlightened intherprise iv th' men that have done so much to advance progress in our beloved country...
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