Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lost Christianity: A Journey of Rediscovery to the Center of Christian Experience (Element Classic) Paperback – September, 1993

4.2 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, September, 1993
$6.95 $0.01
Audio, Cassette, Abridged, Audiobook
"Please retry"
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An uncommon piece of writing that reverberates . . . in a secret, unnamable, very real place in oneself." --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

The acclaimed author of The American Soul, Why Can’t We Be Good? and Money and the Meaning of Life, Jacob Needleman is Professor of Philosophy at San Francisco State University, and former Director of the Center for the Study of New Religions at the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley. He lives in Oakland, CA. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Element Classic
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Element Books Ltd (September 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852301325
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852301323
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,295,799 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jason Mierek on April 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
I must agree with a previous reviewer who claimed that this book challenges the reader to re-think almost everything they understand about "lost" Christianity. Needleman does not present another work on Gnosticism, Christian contemplation, esoteric teachings, or hidden gospels; instead he indicates that a change of heart (an almost ontological change, and not merely one in thought and emotion) is necessary for even the most rudimentary Christian teachings to take root and become REAL in a person's lived experience.

Professor Needleman's writing is superb, with insightful (DEEPLY insightful) comments abounding (in some places, I flagged one or two sentences per paragraph, which is rare). The only "drawback" is that it is up to the reader to find the spiritual guidance necessary to maintain the Question, to develop the unity of purpose needed to realize the Christian gospel (or any other wisdom teachings, for that matter). At least I have a clearer notion of what I am seeking and of what I need to make my Buddhist and Christian spiritual practices REAL.

I am definitely going to reread this book. Highly, highly recommended.
Comment 58 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
His main premise is that Christianity has lost any real means of spiritualy transforming people. That the methods that teach us the "how to" have been lost or replaced with emotional indulgance pretending to be spirituality. As Needleman says "all real religions produce results." The inability for mainstream Chrisitian chruches to do that and even keep members is a sobering reminder that something has gone wrong within western Christianity.
So professor Needleman turns to the more intact Eastern Orthodox Church and does this by using several contemporary Christian thinkers and some of the Orthodox Saints like St. Symeon the New Theologian and St. Gregory Palamas, Thomas Merton, Metropolitan Anthony Bloom, Gurdjieff, and Father Sylvan (it is debateble if Father Sylvan was real, but if he was, I sure hope Prof. Needleman publishes this man's manuscript, hint hint). To illustrate modern Christianity's plight.
Though I have a problem with his inclusion of Gurdjieff. Gurdjieff teachings were not necessarily Christian per se. Gurdjieff advocated the path of the householder not the monk nor the priest. Christianity has no path for the householder who wishes to pursue theosis.
He's right in my opinion, if you examine the Philokalia, though comments from St. Maximus the Confessor, or St. Symeon the New Theologian supports Needleman's assertion that methods once existed for transformation. Though not couched in our modern day verbage, but it's there if you can see. BTW Needlman illustrates this via St. Symeon's understanding on how to fulfill the Sermon on the Mount show just how far away we are from being Christians.
But as Needleman implies it is not a continuous or living tradition like Sufism or Buddhism where the teachings can be passed on from teacher to student.
Read more ›
1 Comment 34 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio Cassette
St. Benedict is to have said: "Always, we begin again". The older I get, the more I know this to be true..especially in light of the urgency I feel for that Truth within Christianity that I know to exist- but how often it eludes me! Prof. Needleman lead me through his own search for possibility. "Occult Christianity", "New Religions", the emptiness of philosophy without a change of Heart,..read and know you DON'T have to look to an Eastern religion for that Kingdom of Heaven within. (I also recommend Robin Amis' "A Different Christianity")
Comment 44 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I have to give some personal background to situate myself. I am a Hare Krishna devotee exploring Christianity again. This book was valuable because of its orientation. It is focused simultaneously on Needleman's personal journey to find the answers to some key questions about Christianity, and the development of a practical orientation which, I firmly believe, the reader will take away, never forget, and use. Among the fascinating people one meets are an Eastern Orthodox cleric, a mysterious Christian monk evidently from Egypt, and a Western Catholic priest - each of whom is onto something no one else seems to be. No superficial book this; for people who are serious and uncompromising in their quest for spiritual development on an ongoing basis. Practical, private, powerful; not doctrine. Engrossing. Turned it around and began it again; ordered several copies for friends.
Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Jacob Needleman has had the courage to re-examine the most basic assumptions about what Jesus intended to communicate, and he does so by sharing the most deeply held thoughts of several extraordinary Christian thinkers today. "All real religion produces results," Needleman writes, and the inability of many of the modern organized Christian churches to do that -- to transform the thought and lives of believers as radically as primitive Christianity did -- reflects the spiritual atrophy that only a rigorous re-thinking of the original Christian ideas can correct. This book can spark your own part in that re-thinking...
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Needleman's praiseworthy investigation is, in some ways a contemporizing of the language of Gurdjieff's writings and teachings from the 3rd and 4th decades of the last century. Needleman's search arose in the late 60s as the spiritual search of youth consciousness trended towards Eastern religious practices. He questioned what was failing with the Christian practices that the East promised to fill. His mouthpiece for bringing Gurdjieffan perceptions closer to our times is an English monk, Father Sylvan, steeped in theology from all walks and attuned to a kaleidiscope of practices for 'soul formation' alien to status quo religion. Needleman disclaims Sylvan as his literary invention. Whether he is or not, it's his questions that drive the book. The concluding chapter,'The Lost religion of Love' is a 'pearler', whether you are a Christian or not(I don't claim as much).J G Bennett, in his voluminous publications and study groups, also set about transmitting Gurdjief's perceptions about'inner Christianity' and his writings and exercises are more expansive about energies and the 'two steams' of attention and dispersal. It's curious, given the commonality of their aims and Bennett's prodigious efforts, that he goes unmentioned in this book. Commentary on the writings of the Desert Fathers, on The Cloud of Unknowing, Loyola, Eckhart, Thomas Merton and others are offered in this thought arousing survey whose message of neighbourly love has lost none of its essential poignancy.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: church history