Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$4.35
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Lost and Found: Dogs, Cats, and Everyday Heroes at a Country Animal Shelter Hardcover – May 1, 1998

4.8 out of 5 stars 49 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$3.98 $0.01

Dog Gone: A Lost Pet's Extraordinary Journey and the Family Who Brought Him Home by Pauls Toutonghi
"Dog Gone" by Pauls Toutonghi
The true story of a lost dog’s journey and a family’s furious search to find him before it is too late. Learn more | See related books
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

For some people, animal shelters seem dark, desperate places. All terrified barks and frightened hisses, the shelter is the last stop for many an animal on what has too often been a painful journey. For others, the shelter is a place of hope, where the perfect dog or cat waits to be adopted. In her time spent volunteering at the Columbia-Greene Humane Society, author Elizabeth Hess discovered that shelter life couldn't be defined in such simple terms. In this "subterranean animal culture," life is a "complex mix of people and animals, emotion and ideology ... where life and death decisions are made as regularly as coffee."

Hess, an arts journalist who has written for the Village Voice and the Washington Post among other publications, first visited the shelter to adopt a dog for her daughter. A "series of ramshackle buildings and a shabby trailer, surrounded by a few chickens and a couple of contented cats," the Columbia-Greene Humane Society grounds were humble at best. But what Hess found inside the shelter inspired her to write Lost and Found: Dogs, Cats, and Everyday Heroes at a Country Animal Shelter. From the dog kennels and the cat rooms to a puppy mill raid and rides in the shelter ambulance, Hess introduces innumerable animals and humans who will inspire, educate, and break your heart. With more than 20 million animals ending up in shelters each year in the United States alone, Hess's demand to rethink our relationships with domestic animals couldn't have come at a better time. Perceptive, well-written, and utterly moving, Lost and Found is a rare find indeed. --Stefanie Hargreaves

From Library Journal

Hess has volunteered for the Columbia-Greene Humane Society for several years. Combining her obvious passion for such work with the skills she has learned as art critic for the Village Voice, she has produced a solidly written book that takes readers directly into the animal shelter. Like most shelters, the one featured here is short on money, staff, and time while long on abused and abandoned animals. Hess helps readers understand how and why the people who work in this field-both paid and volunteer-do what they do. She captures the frustrations of animal welfare advocates-too often confused with animal rights advocates-who feel trapped cleaning up the mess that the uncaring or irresponsible create while facing accusations from no-kill advocates. Anyone questioning the local animal shelter should read this book for an excellent standard of comparison. Recommended for all animal welfare collections.?Alicia Graybill, Lincoln City Libs., NE
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1 edition (May 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0151003378
  • ISBN-13: 978-0151003372
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,060,867 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I could not get enough of this book. I found myself stealing away to read it at odd times as if it was the latest best selling fiction novel. From the first sentence to the last, Elizabeth Hess sweeps you into the world of the county animal shelter. Although the Columbia-Greene Humane Society, of which she writes, is extraordinary in its first rate interest in the animals in its care,the stories of the animals there are those of the millions and millions of discarded animals that end up in shelters everywhere. In addition to being an extremely atmospheric and captivating read, Hess does an excellent job of telling it like it is with a good balance of the bitter and the sweet. Buy this book for yourself and all those who care about the welfare of animals- THIS BOOK WILL STAY IN YOUR HEART FOR YEARS TO COME, I CAN PROMISE YOU THAT!
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I volunteer at my local animal shelter every day. I see it all--the ignorant humans, the frightened pets, the happy endings and the all-too-frequent deaths. Lost and Found does a terrific job of telling the animal welfare tale, and it hits all the issues while remaining utterly readable and thoroughly gripping. If you want the inside scoop on what goes on at animal shelters, this is your book. Moving, inspiring, and TRUE.
Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Once I started reading this book, I couldn't put it down. I'm among those who do know what kind of responsibility it takes to own a dog. I'm the happy 'Mom' of 2 terriers, one of which is a rescue dog. It is true about rescued animals - they know they've been given another chance and will give you their love many times over.
Elizabeth Hess was down to earth in showing the trials and successes an animal shelter goes through. If you know someone who's not sure about getting a pet, I highly suggest they read this book. It'll make them think twice. If you know someone with misconceptions that all shelter animals get homes, give them this book as a wakeup call! A pet can take up as much or more of your time than a human baby, but the human race has made dogs, cats and other animals disposeable. There are happy endings as well as sad in the book, but it's worth buying. As the kids would say, we give it a 2 paws up!
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've volunteered at the animal shelter in my town for a few years now, but have never had quite as much insight as this book provided. I get the feeling the shelter in the book has a smaller volunteer base than the shelter I have dealt with based on the details they were willing to share with her. This was a very uplifting book that explained a lot about why shelters work the way they do (ie rules about who can adopt, what happens when they get lost pets, etc.). Unfortunately, it is most likely to be read by the people that already understand these rules and why they exist.
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I worked for the Humane Society for 6 months so I know exactly what the author is describing in her stories. Some sad and some amazingly heartwarming.
This book should be read by any person who wants to own a pet. Some people just do not realize how much responsility goes into being a pet owner. Financially it can be tough if your animal companion falls ill.
Elizabeth Hess tells stories of the same animal being surrendered to the shelter by several differenet families because they just couldn't handle be an owner. She tells a story of a man chatting with her inside the animal shelter while his box of kittens, that he was surrendering, almost cooked to death in his car on a 98 degree day.
Don't get me wrong there are heartwarming stories in this well written book. Stories of wonderful people giving their lives to help make the shelter a home and safe haven for homeless animals.
A must buy for all animal lovers!
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was so good, after I read it I reordered it in hardbound so that it would "keep better" on my shelf. This way I can pass around my paperback copy to my co-workers at the shelter I work at. Since I work in a "no-kill", privately funded shelter full time, I can relate to the stories told in Ms. Hess' book. Even though we are "no-kill", we work very closely with our city funded shelter (the pound) to transfer animals out of there that are on the euthanasia list. This is a hard job, choosing who will live and who will die for us, but the hardest part is for people who work in euthanasia full time. These are the folks who have to "clean up the mess" of others who fail to spay or neuter their pets, the "backyard" breeders and the general population who fail to keep that life long commitment they made to their pets when they dump them at the shelter. By the way, very few of the animals that are dumped find homes. Stray animals are kept up to 72 hours, depending on cage space. Owner released animals are usually killed immediately, or as one employee said to a surrenderer, "As soon as the ink is dry on your release form, your animal will be dead." Recommended reading for anyone who wants to run out and get a pet, should be required reading. Please excuse my harshness, but I'm writing this in the middle of "kitten season."
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book is a moving, well written and ultimately very human account of what happens in a rural animal shelter. The animal stories are fascinating - whether you are a lover of a specific breed or an appreciator of shelter dogs and cats (as I am!), you will find an animal in these pages to touch your heart. In addition, the dedication of the volunteers and the I am sure, highly underpaid staff that helps rescue, care and love these animals is inspiring.
The only hitch that I sort of noticed was Ms. Hess' seeming bias towards Pit Bulls, speaking in somewhat degrading terms about them and even making a sideways comment about an "infestation". She does redeem herself in the end, noting that they are extremely loyal dogs. As someone who is owned by a boxer/pit bull shelter dog, I can truly attest to their undying loyalty, gentleness and ease with adults and children alike (though most don't like other dogs). Most shelters are teeming with pit bulls who bark all day because of other dogs and look ferocious. Too many of these beautiful animals are euthanized every day. Please consider this breed!
She raises another important point about black cats (a black cat currently runs my household, she's in charge of everything, including the pit bull) ... there are many of them and people still see them as "bad luck". I have had nothing but good luck since Ms. Jen came along ... just something to think about (I never knew I had the two toughest shelter cases living in my home!)
All in all, this book with make you think about shelter animals and the benefits of adopting one, as well as the responsibilities of pet ownership and the growing cat/dog overpopulation crisis. Read it, then responsibly adopt a pet. Like a pit bull or a black cat.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews