Shop Auto Winter Products Salon Beauty Best Books of the Year Black Friday Deals Week nav_sap_hiltonhonors_launch For a limited time. 3 months for $0.99. Amazon Music Unlimited. New subscribers only. Terms and conditions apply. PCB for Musical Instruments Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Gift Shop Book a house cleaner for 2 or more hours on Amazon Early Black Friday deals: save 40% or more on Amazon Video Early Black Friday deals: save 40% or more on Amazon Video Early Black Friday deals: save 40% or more on Amazon Video  Three new members of the Echo family Save $50 on All-New Fire HD 10. Limited-time offer. $30 off Kindle Paperwhite GNO Shop Now HTL17_gno

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
22


on April 20, 2015
I bought this book because I saw a movie and by reading about it I came across these two ladies who put the book together. I did a very good purchase. The stories are heart wrenching and I was moved to tears on the atrocities committed against prominent people who collected the most refined art and were stripped from everything they owed, mainly art, because it was so valuable. I hope more readers can see and learn about what happened, it is so shameful that humanity can become like this. There are some pieces recuperated but on the whole, it's almost all lost. Yet the hardest part is about knowing the lost lives, as they were such great people. Don't miss this opportunity and read a great piece in history.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on September 16, 2011
This is a wonderful book covering 15 separate stories involving people and places connected with Nazi-looted art. The authors, Melissa Mueller and Dr. Monica Tatzkow, are from Germany, and the first version of the book was published in Germany. This is a recent English version from Vendome Press, and it couldn't be more interesting, or the photos more beautiful, even haunting.

On the cover, the "Golden Adele" purchased for $135 million dollars by Ronald Lauder for his Neue Gallery in NYC of German and Austrian art. (Worth a stop when you're in New York!) At the time, the most paid for a single painting ever. This was part of a series of Gustav Klimt paintings recovered from Austria for the late Maria Altmann in Los Angeles, who was the heir to these treasures, stolen by the Nazis in WWII. Maria's attorney, Randolph Schoenberg of Los Angeles, in recovering her art from Austria, set an important precedent at the U.S. Supreme Court with this case. Interestingly, Mr. Schoenberg is the grandson or great-grandson of Arnold Schoenberg, renowned music composer, and visual artist. The several Klimts recovered by Mr. Schoenberg for Mrs. Altmann brought over $300 million at auction when they were sold after their recovery. In the world of fine art and Holocaust Era claims, the Altmann case set a major precedent, allowing a U.S. citizen to bring an action against a foreign sovereign gov't., as an exception to the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA), here in the U.S. federal courts, for hording Nazi-looted art.

Also covered, the high profile Cassirer v. Kingdom of Spain case, where a family in California is trying to recover a priceless Impressionist masterpiece by Camille Pissarro, currently hanging at the Thyssen Museum in Madrid, Spain. (You can easily Google these cases, and read more about them -- fascinating.) The Cassirer's Pissarro was stolen by the Nazis from the Cassirer family in Germany in 1939, just before war broke out in Europe. Wonderful story, wonderful pictures. The Supreme Court in Washington recently ruled in favor of the Cassirer claim by denying review of a recent 9-2 "en banc" ruling at the Ninth Cir. Ct. of Appeals, allowing the case to finally proceed to trial at the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Trial is currently scheduled for July 3, 2012. The Seattle-based law firm Davis Wright Tremaine represents the Cassirers in that case.

This is an unusually beautiful and well-written book, an oversized hardback with stunning cover art on the sleeve, and filled with wonderful photos of people, places and Nazi-looted art, something you could easily have as a conversation starter on your coffee table. Highly recommend.

David in Telluride
15 helpful votes
16 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on December 31, 2013
Beautifully written and illustrated, poignant stories of extraordinary Jewish families and the spoliation and occasional long-delayed partial recovery of their estates. A paean to the Washington Convention of 1998 and a visceral condemnation of the ongoing mendacity of European administrations and their museums.

The foreword is by Ronald Lauder, not, as the amazon description says, Elie Wiesel. There is some missing text between pages 226 and 228, dunno how much.
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on December 4, 2012
Jewish art collectors are featured here in loving detail. Their lives before the war, how they started collecting, what they collected, how it was stolen from them, and then tragically how difficult (and sometimes impossible) it has been for their heirs to get the pieces that are still intact returned to them or at least compensated for. The book is also very well illustrated with photos of the collectors and their homes, as well as some of the pieces in their collections.
A great read and at times a sad commentary on what the world lost in terms of culture and civilized behavior.
1 helpful vote
2 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on August 13, 2015
After seeing the movie about Klimt's Adel which was great I have found the book beautifully written and very interesting and informative. With many illustrations of the lost art which I had never seen or known about I found it a very worthwhile book to own as an artist. Beautiful book.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on October 30, 2013
As an artist, I'm always interested in art stories. As a student of history, I also enjoy reading anything that weaves history and art. The theft of art during WWII was staggering. This book showcases a few instances of that theft. Emotionally compelling.
1 helpful vote
2 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on December 13, 2015
Very satisfied with this book purchase.
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on January 15, 2014
Thoroughly documented records of the methods used by the Nazis to steal the property and lives of Europe's Jews. While we associate such stealing and plunder with the Nazis, their methods are those which have been used by dictators for centuries. The records of these atrocities, and how they impacted individual families are open for all to study, in horror, as a reminder to all people to be wary of the next Hitler. THERE WILL ALWAYS BE ANOTHER ONE......AND ANOTHER.......AND ANOTHER!
Helen Kuzmier
3 helpful votes
4 helpful votes
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on July 29, 2015
perfect
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse
on May 17, 2015
Thanks
1 helpful vote
|
0Comment|Report abuse