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Showing 1-10 of 115 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 156 reviews
on March 6, 2016
One of the most complex and beautiful pieces of literature I've ever read. Completely worth the hours of notes I took to fully understand the complex story line.
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on April 27, 2015
I loved this book, which was assigned to me in a Native American literature course focusing on oral tradition. The book, itself, is a series of separate, yet intimately intertwined first-person narratives that combine to tell a story of life--family life, reservation life, and the struggles those engender for the people of the Chippewa tribe. One doesn't have to be of Native American descent, however, to connect with the book and its characters.

While the order in which the narratives are told is key to the story as literature, one could read them in any order and still recognize the story that's being told. Again--this mimics life. We each have shared experiences (with family members, friends, co-workers, etc.) and we can pick our shared experiences/stories up at any point and understand where we are in the narrative. Life is linear only in the sense of time -- memories and experiences are non-linear, especially those that really shape us. They happened at one point but they pop up in many aspects of our lives forever.

To me, "Love Medicine" is, at its core, a wonderful telling of life -- like life. It is simultaneously sad, inspiring, thought-provoking and hard to get through, but--also like life--worth every single moment.
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on March 10, 2016
Louise Erdrich's first and maybe best. The only book i've read that, halfway through the first time, i knew when i finished i would set it aside for one month, then read it again. Which i did. A symposium of idiosyncratic narrators, some goofy, some profound, all revelatory. Faulkner nor Jim Harrison never did it better.
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on August 16, 2017
I first read this book many years ago. It was compelling then and more so now. I wish all of LE's books were available on kindle.
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on May 8, 2015
This is a wonderful book. (Look at the awards it won.) But then, I think all of Erdrich's fiction is wonderful, and this book was the beginning. It is where all of her intertwined stories begin taking shape. If you want to continue reading her, be aware that her story about these characters evolves over time -- just like any good oral storytelling.
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on October 25, 2015
Her ability to describe people and situations is uncanny and definitely not boring. This is the fourth Erdrich novel I've read and I can't wait to read my next. But maybe I'll read something lighter before my next choice which is The Beet Queen.
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on June 1, 2013
I believe the story was accurate in a fictional sense, blunt and true about Native American living conditions on all reservations across the U.S. I believe the U.S. government would like to remove all Native Americans from North America because "whites" stole their native land and forced them to live on uninhabitable reservations with broken many promises. The novel was hardcore exposing suicide due to a loss of self respect, along with extremely poor housing conditions, no tolerance for alcohol, no work and no employment due to poor education from inferior schools are only a few of the true to life trials revealed in Love Medicine.
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on January 13, 2013
On my belated discovery of Louise Erdrich through her blog, I started with this book on the recommendation of a friend. And while I wasn't disappointed in the vividness department, I felt oddly unsatisfied at the end. Honesty and strong imagery in depicting the dark and self-destructive behavior of one's characters is good... but allowing them on occasion to have some insight into themselves and that behavior would be even better. I'm not giving up - Ms Erdrich is a wonderful writer. But next time I think I'll choose a book she herself has mentioned as a favorite. This Kindle edition, by the way, suffers from more annoying typos than it should.
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on December 28, 2016
The book is good. However, it is a required reading for my child. She was very uncomfortable with the sexual content and reading it out loud in class. It's a bit much for high school students.
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on November 15, 2016
Members of our book group agreed it was a difficult book to read and absorb the story; a few did not even try to finish the book. We also felt the author was unduly harsh viewing the lifestyle of these Indians and that she could have found some positives to be included.
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