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For the Love of Money : A Novel Hardcover – Deckle Edge, August 15, 2000

1.9 out of 5 stars 188 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Rowdy and predictable, this sequel to Flyy Girl, the tale of a streetwise, boy-crazy Philadelphia teen who learns some hard lessons, revisits the life and times of Tracy Ellison Grant, now 28 and a successful author (of a novel called Flyy Girl), TV and screenwriter, and rising movie actress, as she takes a closer look at her fame, fortune and heart. Tracy's old flame, Victor Hinson, has been doing a stretch in jail; once released, he changes his name and marries someone else. Tracy tries not to let his defection stop her from enjoying her notoriety. But she is still vulnerable as she makes a visit to her old stomping grounds, Philadelphia's Germantown: she feels exposed and fake speaking at her old high school, and on a radio chat show she's disturbed to hear rumors that she's a lesbian. She stays in touch with her old crew, but she is disillusioned on that front, too. Her friend, Kiwana, formerly Afrocentric and militant, disappoints Tracy when she marries a white man, and fast-talking Mercedes audaciously tries to scam Tracy for money. Tracy's heart still retains a soft spot for the reformed Victor, now a Muslim businessman, and the embers of their old affair flare up in a situation that resolves itself in several surprises. Tyree may turn off some readers with Tracy's clich?d poetry and occasional references to himself and his success throughout the narrative. Although the prose (rife with self-important italicized words to make obvious points) is often clunky and the dialogue flat, Tracy's adventures provide cool commentary on ambition, love, friendship and the price of fame.
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

In this sequel to Flyy Girl, Tyree brings readers up to date on the fast-lane life of Tracy Ellison. Continuing his skillful use of dialog, the author wanders between present and past to tell the story of Tracy, now a Hollywood celebrity. Chapters end with poetry by Tracy about becoming a star, being dumped by her first love, Victor, and returning to her hometown. She tries to act unaffected by her success, but family, friends, and acquaintances relate to her differently. Tracy "struggles" to get a hot movie part while trying to lure author Omar Tyree to help her write the sequel to Flyy Girl. By book's end, (surprise) he agrees to write it. The book is filled with other annoying self-serving plugs for the author. Maybe Tracy's story is uplifting and intended to give a positive picture of stardom, money, and family. Maybe young adult readers are supposed to learn how wonderful money and fame can be if you keep your head on straight. However, the tale and the telling are just not very interesting. Curious fans of Flyy Girl might pick it up. For libraries with the first novel; others may want to pass.DShirley Gibson Coleman, Ann Arbor Dist. Lib., MI
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (August 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684872919
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684872919
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 6.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 1.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (188 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,731,794 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Janeth C. Walker on August 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The original title, Flyy Girl, was such an awesome book. But on the cover of For The Love Of Money, it says, "Flyy Girl Returns". To what?
On the inside of this book, the acknowledgements read in part "Well...I'm back And I heard that you missed me." What I missed was.... a good story between the front of the jacket cover and the back. What happened? Why deceive us? One would think that while a reader can appreciate Tracy growing up and becoming a star as the author wants you to believe, what ever happened to real life drama on the way up to stardom? Tracy is still a very young woman, under thirty and as self centered as she was, I could think of many ways to have added at least a plot of some sort to keep my readers interested. The selected few who've read this book, kept reading, not because of the words on the pages, but because they invested a weeks worth of gas money and felt compelled to use it up.
I was going to return this book directly to the publisher with a letter of apology for buying the wrong book or at least a sympathy letter for them having to publish it. But I've since decided to keep it and check it out like libraries do. I wouldn't want anyone else having to waste money like this.
There are some good parts about the publishing of this book. To begin, Omar Tyree knows he's got a seller with this book simply because of the cover and it's an alleged part II. Omar Tyree also did something very unique in that he wrote in the past and present with each chapter and he's obviously a brilliant business person in his ability to create an attraction. The unfortunate part is that he omits realism with what can really happen to a young woman from the east coast coming to the west coast and encoutering true friendship, love, betrayal and deception, in a "full of drama" kind of way.
This book just lacks a story!
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Format: Hardcover
Bro' Omar, what were you thinking? That you could throw a bunch of silly mix-matched words on paper just to call it a book? Or maybe you were on a tight dead-line for the publishing company and they had to put something/anything on the market. Whatever the case, you did yourself and your fans a serious disservice in penning For The Love of Money. I don't have to be a playa-hater to call trash exactly what it is. I liked Flyy Girl, but this mess doesn't even deserve to be called a book. If this is all it takes to write a book and get paid, I'm starting mine as soon as I finish typing this message.
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By A Customer on August 5, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I'll keep it simple: HATED IT.
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By A Customer on February 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
What is the point of this awful book? It's not even so bad that it's good, it's just bad. Where is the conflict in the story? What is the point of reading it? Why is it that Tracy just happens to be the all around best person there ever was, and her one flaw and problem is her past (which is brought up ad nauseum)
And then, to remind us that it is Omar the Great penning this fanciful flight into absolute inanity, the reader is presented with lines such as "You should write this book yourself, Tracy" (any self respecting writer WOULD do her own story, no matter what, because, DUH no one can capture what she felt better than she can. There is no way that Omar Tyree [playing the character of the invisible author] could be privy to most of her conversations; because the majority of her babble was just a waste of space. If he WAS a good writer, there's no way he would have included all that unnecessary filler, and he would have gone straight to the conflict had there been one. )
And then there's the self congratulatory tone of Omar. Tracy, ofcourse cannot write her own memoirs (heaven forbid!) because she's too busy. Using another writer is out of the question because Omar is "wonderful with dialogue, and he really knows how to set up the situations well" Insert eye roll here Okay, so he's the great writer, while Tracy, the Masters Degree having (please tell us in what field again, Tracy, we didn't hear it enough!), English Teacher, Screenwriter-turned-Actress is only, well, mediocre in her writing skills when compared to Omar, the epitome of a great writer.
This book makes very little sense, and frankly, I'm heated that I spent so much time reading it. The only redeeming feature is probably the little insight it gives into "making it" in Hollywood.
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A Kid's Review on August 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
this book is a complete disappointment. The first was a coming of age tale that even hit close to home with someone as young as me. I hated the Omar Tyree references and the boring life of Tracy. He should of left the uncompleted life of Tracy alone. My imagination would of came up with a better ending.
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Format: Hardcover
Considering the fact that Flyy Girl had absolutely NO plot whatsoever (I bought the first book, hated it, gave it to my 14-yr. old sister and an hour later, she came back agitated and gave it back), and the fact that the author is full of 100% hot air, surely it should come as no surprise that this latest bomb is precisely that. I passed by the book the other day at the bookstore and stopped in surprise because I hadn't realized this author was still trying. I picked it up ANYWAY, just out of curiosity. Luckily, I kept my receipt.
This has to be a joke, I thought, until I heard the radio commercial promoting this book this morning. The book is absolutely horrid, and that's an understatement. Why in the world would somebody devote presumably valuable time, money and energy to create this mess, not to mention the money he must have paid on advertising. Why not just write a GOOD BOOK and let the book promote itself mostly by word of mouth! Hel-lo-o-o-o-, PLEASE take a lesson from SOMEBODY. You don't see anybody else doing radio commercials to sell books. Have some class, man! I half expected this one to be better than Flyy Girl simply because I like to be optimistic. This book was a major letdown and I actually feel sorry for the author. I'd be ashamed to have my name on an imitation book like this. Unfortunately, this flop is a major blow to aspiring AfAm authors. Because publishers are allowing authors like this to publish junk, they will be less inclined to sign new authors and take them seriously. Is this Simon & Schuster's idea of GOOD FICTION?? Are they lowering the standards for quality Black fiction or what?! I think yes, and find it extremely insulting. If anyone other than a Black author had written this mess, it would have been rejected at the mailroom.
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