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Most Loved in All the World Hardcover – January 12, 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 3–6—A slave mother creates a quilt to guide and comfort her young daughter, whom she is sending to freedom along the Underground Railroad. In a straightforward, heartfelt story written in dialect, Hegamin shows that a woman can love her child dearly yet still give her up, in the youngster's best interest. An author's note explains that debates over the authenticity of quilts used as maps continue; Hegamin states that she used the quilt as a symbol and story device. The artwork matches the tone of the story well, featuring dark images interspersed with quilted blocks that bring brightness to the primitive-style paintings. Patchwork endpapers that incorporate recognizable quilt blocks add to the homespun feel of the story. Paired with Deborah Hopkinson's Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt (Knopf, 2003), this book would be a useful discussion point for supplementing Underground Railroad units.—Angela J. Reynolds, Annapolis Valley Regional Library, Bridgetown, NS, Canada
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

A young girl knows that “Mama works hard in the field,” but the full reality of their lives as slaves is unclear to her. She knows Mama picks cotton; she knows she salves Mama’s hands at night. She also knows that Mama has been spending a lot of time lately cutting pieces of cloth to stitch together pictures for a quilt. After coming home one night bloody from a whipping, Mama removes her ruined red shirt and cuts from it a heart, adding it to her designs. A late-night rendezvous reveals that the quilt’s images are to serve as instructions to help the daughter escape through the Underground Railroad: “a log cabin for safety / a star to follow / moss on the trees to lead. / And in the middle, a little girl so happy, surrounded by a worn and tattered heart.” Cabrera’s artwork matches textured, muddy paintings—the dark, anonymous dots of hunched cotton pickers is particularly affecting—with swaths of appropriately distressed cloth. An educational author’s note caps off this haunting yet hopeful presentation. Grades K-2. --Daniel Kraus
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The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 530L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (December 20, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618419039
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618419036
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 0.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,478,053 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was beautifully written and beautifully illustrated. It brought tears to my eyes when I read it to my daughter. She's only 3.5 years old, so she's still young to fully understand this book, but I'm preserving it for her for later. This book is surely a keeper.
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By elfdart on February 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
this was such a good story. i just flipped through it with the intention of putting it down, but it was really touching. it is a story about a girl and her mother, both of which are slaves at the time of the black slave trade, and the story is told through the eyes of the girl, who is very young and doesnt really grasp the reality of the situation. she just knows that her mother works hard in the fields and that she helps her by rubbing some salve in them at night. her mother makes quilt patches throughout the story and at the end makes a quilt for her daughter. the story ends with the mother giving the daughter to group of people in the underground railroad so that she'll maybe have a better life somewhere else. it was pretty sad, but good.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I believe because I am a quilter, I enjoyed this book and the artwork, but my class, overall, was not taken with it. When I finished reading it aloud to them they pretty much just wanted to move on to something else. It was difficult to illicit any input about connections or opinions on it.
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Format: Hardcover
Hegamin has created a beautiful book that parents, teachers and friends can use to help younger kids to understand the horrors and hardships of slavery, as well as the often unsung love that helped people to survive this horrific period in American history. Perfect for anyone who wants to start a conversation about slavery with children. Sad, yes, but honest. Wonderful!
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