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Lucky Peach Issue 3 Paperback – March 20, 2012

4.6 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Peter Meehan is a food writer and former "New York Times" restaurant columnist. His most recent book is "Momofuku", co-authored with the chef David Chang.




Chris Ying worked as designer, editor, and publisher of McSweeney's before becoming editor in chief of Lucky Peach. He is the coauthor of Ivan Ramen and a founder of the nonprofit organization ZeroFoodprint. He lives in San Francisco with his wife, Jami.
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Product Details

  • Series: Lucky Peach
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Lucky Peach (March 20, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1936365480
  • ISBN-13: 978-1936365487
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 8.5 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #639,229 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Issue 3 of Lucky Peach continues to be a good read, but this issue isn't as strong or nearly as accessible as the first two. It's the cooks and chefs issue!

What does that even mean? Are there celebrity chefs uttering expletives and regaling us with tales of drunken rampage, cynicism, and life itself? It means that this issue isn't for everyone. Yes, there's cussing. There's also plenty of fantastic stories of and interviews with chefs that range from street food vendors in southeast Asia, to head chefs of Michelin rated restaurants, and everyone in between. There's also some interesting food tossed in for good measure.

If you're someone who is interested in cooking as a career, or wish to have a restaurant of your own some day, this issue is for you. Some of the lessons and warnings you may have heard before, but it's always nice to get a good slap in the face every now and again for a reality check. Especially when it's so well written and in giggle inducing anecdotes. Lucky Peach issue 3 explores a lot of the trials and tribulations of making the career choice of being a cook. "Enroll in the Culinary Institute", they said. "Be a cook, it'll be FUN", they said. Like that old trope on joining the military, being a cook isn't without its share of dangers and unintended consequences. Chang et al share their ideas on what this career (and lifestyle, in many cases), means for them and where they think it's headed. For better or worse.

I'm not a professional chef, nor do I have aspirations of ever being one. I don't know the names of all of the hot restaurants and 85% of the famous chef's names dropped within the first 5 pages. Nor do I care to.
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Format: Paperback
I'm with Chef D.B. on this one. And not Messrs McFall and Murray - incidentally, both their reviews seem to indicate they got more out of it than their star ratings would indicate.

It seems to me that Lucky Peach 3 shows the periodical has now got into its real stride. I was amused by LP 1 [bronze], with all its connotations of the wilder reaches of gonzo journalism, but it [like 2 and 3] introduced a segment from Saint Harold McGee to pay high respect to. I was even more entertained by LP 2 [silver], but I've really been stirred by LP 3 [gold].

I'm a cook, not a chef. I'm a household cook, and have been for 40 years, and never gone near a pass door, or been sworn at. I've been to very few major restaurants like the ones discussed in the latest issue, and have watched only one cooking series on TV [the first Hester Blumenthal set]. Lucky Peach is the only food magazine I've ever subscribed to, and I'll continue to do so.

The key interest in the current issue is the debate raised about educating cooks and chefs. As someone remarks in support of Thomas Keller, who can speak against education? I'm not. What the various contributions to the debate indicate is that professional credentials for cooking schools need a stronger curriculum base than the current enrolees are entitled to expect for their money. My home city, Melbourne, Australia, boasts a cooking school with a high reputation, the William Angliss School, and various fly-by-night food and hospitality training enterprises. Lucky Peach 3, as a resource at curriculum revision sessions for these and like institutions, stands tall.

I particularly liked David Chang's funereal eulogy on "chefism". And the gallery of people who variously exemplify "cookism".
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This is really a wonderful little magazine.
Some aspects of it are like a 'zine: the roughness, the unpolished parts, the illustrations of hairy balls, the rambling writers, the burry photos.
Other parts are very high end: the paper, the printing, the binding, the editors, the ideas and tone.

So somehow they've brought these 2 extremes together and made something totally unique, selling it for $12.

This is not for everyone. If you love the Food Network magazine, or the Pioneer Woman blog, you might find Lucky Peach totally baffling. And in a year, it may run out of steam. But for this point in time in the commercial food business, Lucky Peach is the perfect magazine at the perfect time, forging its own vernacular, and with no rational endgame in sight.

It's a fun thing to read and be a part of.
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Great Non-Traditional Magazine. Some off color language is used, which might offend some. I personally can over look that and enjoy this publication. Really good and a nice change of pace from the typical food publications.
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This magazine is so beautiful. I'm keeping up with new publications and trying to get back issues when I can because it is so great. I love the way people write in this. They write just what they would say so it's all strewn with curse words and real things people would say.
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It's getting a little wierd, I have to say. I like all of the contributing authors in their own right and Dave Chang and Anthony Bourdain have been favorites for a long time. The first two were interesting and fun. This one a little odd. Maybe two much ingestion of something before serious editing took place.

I will continue to get it though with the hope it gets a little more down to earth.

Doug Murray
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