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Luther's Works Lectures on Galatians: Chapters 1-4 (Luther's Works) (Luther's Works (Concordia))

4.8 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0570064268
ISBN-10: 0570064260
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  • Luther's Works Lectures on Galatians: Chapters 1-4 (Luther's Works) (Luther's Works (Concordia))
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Martin Luther (1483, 1546) was a German monk, a theologian and church reformer, he is considered to be the founder of Protestantism. Luther was a professor of Bible at the University of Wittenberg when he posted his famous 95 Theses (1517). In addition to writing many books, Luther translated the Bible into German. Luther believed that salvation was only by faith in Jesus, unmediated by the church. He challenged papal authority by emphasing the Bible as the only source of religious authority and believed the church to be a priesthood of all believers.These ideas helped to inspire the Protestant Reformation and changed the course of Western civilization. He married Katharina von Bora thus initiating the practice of clerical marriage within Protestantism.- Publisher.

Jaroslav Pelikan is Sterling Professor of History at Yale University.
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Product Details

  • Series: Luther's Works (Concordia) (Book 26)
  • Hardcover: 492 pages
  • Publisher: Concordia Publishing House (June 1, 1962)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0570064260
  • ISBN-13: 978-0570064268
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 1.7 x 9.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #254,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By G. Boritzki on March 9, 2001
If one thinks they know Luther because they are familiar with the Lutheran church, then they need to read this book. Speaking on subjects one might speak of today, you can see the praticality of this great reformer. When standing against all odds, he spoke truth, when it was not at all popular to speak the truth. This is a must read for anyone desiring to know Luther, or even understand how controversial a person Luther really was.
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Format: CD-ROM
I had been looking to add Luther's Works to My Logos Libronix Digital Library System for some time. Truth be told, it was the reason I went with Logos Bible Software in the first place. The cost seemed prohibative at $250 until I found it on Amazon.com for $169 with free shipping! I read one review that said it was difficult to integrate with Libronix. I was nervous for that reason. However, it was NOT difficult at all. In fact, it was so simple, I wasn't sure I had done it right! This is an awesome tool, to have Luther's Works at your fingertips, to go from the index directly to the volume and page you need in a split second. Awesome! Thanks.
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The "Table Talk" of Martin Luther are the uncensored remarks (recorded by his supporters) that Luther made at the dinner table, with family and friends. They range from the profound, to the humorous, to the vulgar, to even some patently offensive remarks (such as some about Jewish persons on pages 239 and 426).

He recounted how a confessor once told him, "'God is not angry with you, but you are angry with God.' This was magnificently said, although it was before the light of the gospel." (Pg. 15)

He recalled that when he was a monk and interpreting the Bible, "I allegorized everything. Afterward through the Epistle to the Romans I came to some knowledge of Christ. I recognized then that allegories are nothing." (Pg. 46) Later, he states that his earliest books are now "offensive not only to my adversaries but also to me." (Pg. 213) He also suggests, significantly, that "We should throw the Epistle of James out of this school, for it doesn't amount to much. It contains not a syllable about Christ." (Pg. 424)

He says that Zwingli "made the mistake of thinking that he knew everything, that theology is an easy art. But I know that I have yet to comprehend the Lord's Prayer." (Pg. 51) More harshly, he opines that "Zwingli and Erasmus are nothing but wormy nuts that taste like cr_p in one's mouth." (Pg. 73)

When experiencing sexual temptation, he admits, "Copious drinking benefits me when I am in this condition. But I would not advise a young person to drink more..." (Pg. 18) He defends infant baptism, arguing that "Christ commanded that all nations be taught and baptized, and this included children." (Pg. 113) He asserts that the pope is "the masked and incarnate devil because he is the Antichrist." (Pg. 346) The legends of the saints are "so full of shameful lies that it's astonishing." (Pg. 475)

Seldom boring, Luther's Table Talk is essential reading for getting a "complete" portrait of the man.
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Format: Hardcover
Martin Luther (1483-1546) was originally a German monk, priest, and professor of theology. This volume covers the period from 1517 (when his Ninety-Five Theses attacked the doctrine of indulgences, as practiced by Johann Tetzel in particular), to his conflicts with the Roman Catholic curia; it ends before his excommunication by Pope Leo X in 1521. (See Luther's Works, Volume 32: Career of the Reformer II for the next volume.)

In the Disputation Against Scholastic Theology, he asserts that Aristotle is to theology as darkness is to light. (Pg. 12) [Later, he states that the ideas of Plato are better than Aristotle's; pg. 42) He concludes the Disputation by stating that he has said nothing that is not in agreement with the Catholic church and the teachers of the church. (Pg. 16)

In his famous Ninety-Five Theses, he rejects Tetzel's claim that as the money clinks into the money chest, the soul flies out of purgatory, asserting "when money clinks into the money chest, greed and avarice can be increased." (Pg. 28) In his Explanations of the 95 Theses, he states that "I desire to say or maintain absolutely nothing except... what is in the Holy Scriptures and can be maintained from them; and then what is in and from the writings of the church fathers and is accepted by the Roman church..." (Pg. 83) Later, he says that it is vain to trust in salvation by indulgence letters. (Pg. 208)

In the Heidelberg Disputation, he puts forward the thesis that outside of grace, the will of man is not free; the will is necessarily in bondage and captive even if it is free of all compulsion. (Pg.
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This collection of the writings of Martin Luther (1483-1546) does not actually contain any sermons that Luther preached (for a selection of 43 of those, see Luther's Works, Volume 51: Sermons I); instead, this volume contains his "Church Postil" (i.e., "marginal notes," or commentary) written in 1521-1522, which was material he intended to be used by other preachers. Interestingly, they all concern specific festivals (particularly Christmas).

He suggests that "there is no more gruesome plague, misery, or misfortune on earth than a preacher who does not preach God's word... they are ravening wolves in sheep's clothing." (Pg. 25) He states that those who preach human doctrine make a human being into a light, and put themselves in the place of the true light, as the pope and his followers have done. "For this reason he is also the 'Anti-Christ'; he is against this true light." (Pg. 69)

He argues that just as no Christian is born except by the Scriptures, "so too no one can become a heretic except by the Scriptures. For if Christ is a sign of rejection over which men stumble... should we therefore reject him or set up another Christ alongside him?" (Pg. 176)

He wishes that "all books might simply be abolished and nothing but the pure, simple Scripture or Bible remain throughout the world, especially among Christians. There is more than enough in it about all manner of knowledge and doctrine which is useful and necessary for a person to know." (Pg. 206-207)

Though less lively in some respects than Luther's actual sermons, these "unpreached" sermons contain much material that will interest students of Luther and his theology.
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