Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel (Sciencewriters) 1st Edition

4.6 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-1603584463
ISBN-10: 1603584463
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $1.01
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy new
$15.62
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
List Price: $27.95 Save: $12.33 (44%)
16 New from $14.99
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Lynn Margulis: The Life a... has been added to your Cart
More Buying Choices
16 New from $14.99 9 Used from $12.25
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

$15.62 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel (Sciencewriters)
  • +
  • Dazzle Gradually: Reflections on the Nature of Nature
  • +
  • Symbiotic Planet: A New Look At Evolution
Total price: $46.10
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

ForeWord Reviews-

Best known for her work on the origins of eukaryotic cells, symbiogenesis as a force in evolution, and the Gaia hypothesis, Lynn Margulis was a scientist whose lively spirit and frank opinions left behind an enduring legacy that’s well worth remembering.  When she died after a stroke in 2011, obituaries emphasized her ability to turn complicated scientific concepts into mainstream discussions, and even after she married famous cosmologist Carl Sagan, her own star was just as bright.  In this thoughtful and expertly curated collection, Margulis’s son and long-time collaborator, Dorion Sagan, calls her “indomitable Lynn.” A fearless and zealous advocate of her theories who could also display a loving heart, he writes, “[H]er threat was not to people but to the evil done to the spirit by the entrenchment of unsupported views.”  In other essays, Margulis’s complex personality beguiles, frustrates, charms, and elevates various writers, resulting in a stunning portrait that no single remembrance could have captured.



Luminaries throughout the scientific world share their memories of her bulldog attitude and scientific contributions, showing that although she’s gone, her work definitely still resonates and informs evolutionary biology and other fields.  Jorge Wagensberg, a physicist and professor from the University of Barcelona, calls Margulis “biology’s greatest heroine,” while astrobiologist Penny Boston recalls the scientist’s ability to be like an “earth mother” who was encouraging and friendly.  Other contributors share stories about traipsing with her through marshes on Cape Cod talking about biology, or calling Margulis in the middle of the night with sudden scientific insight (only to have her gently say, “Okay. Now go back to sleep”). There are several of her students who recall her tenacity and ferocious curiosity, two attributes that drove them toward deepening their own research. 



The collection is organized chronologically, grouping together essays about her early days as a scientist and following with her establishment in the scientific community, her work as a “modern-day Copernicus,” and her role as a teacher, neighbor, and friend. The photographs included in the volume are also perfectly chosen, with every image showing her forceful personality, relentless focus, and often-captivating smile.  Taken as a whole, Sagan’s collection is a fitting tribute to a woman whose life and legacy have touched so many others. As he notes, her indomitable spirit lives on through her children, grandchildren, colleagues, and students―and most of all, through the work that she championed so well.





Publishers Weekly-

There are two kinds of great scientists, writes former American Society of Microbiology president Moselio Schaechter in this eclectic, sometimes electrifying, book about biologist Lynn Margulis. There are those making "impressive experiments" and those making "groundbreaking theoretical syntheses." Margulis was the latter, notes Schaechter. Margulis fiercely championed evolutionary symbiogenesis, the merging of distinct organisms to form new organisms in swift, un-Darwinian leaps. Margulis was eventually proven right in some life forms. But her insistence that most evolution involves symbiogenesis led to a lifetime of debate. It also leads to some inspired writing in this book of essays, edited by Sagan, her son and cowriter (Dazzle Gradually: Reflections on the nature of Nature). "A dangerous liaison" is what Margulis felt drove species creation, writes Oxford paleobiologist Martin Brasier in one of the best essays. "A symbiosis between two distantly related organisms that wantonly swapped their genetic information to form completely new genetic strains." Some writing here reflects the idea that life is not a hierarchical tree, but a web, and embraces aspects of the controversial "Gaia" earth model which may put [off] Traditional Darwinian scientists. But this is a captivating read for anyone interested in what powers great scientists.



“I hope that in due time she will be recognized as one of the greatest scientific thinkers of our time.”--Ernest Callenbach, author of Ecotopia



“Although she could be a bulldog, her heart was soft and her spirit loving beneath the scientific realpolitik of her conversation and the insistent tough-mindedness of her sometimes strident and blunt, withering and refreshingly unadorned opinions.”--Dorion Sagan, from the introduction



“It’s the ideas that really matter―and Lynn certainly had hers. They were novel and profound, and she simply wanted all the rest of the world to adjust their thinking to accommodate and embrace what she saw were the simple, beautiful truths that she had uncovered.”--Dr. Niles Eldredge, contributor, and author of Darwin: Discovering the Tree of Life



"I can't imagine what the world of biological science in the twentieth century would have been had Lynn Margulis not come along. In this volume, we can read about some of the vast range of intellect she influenced."--Wes Jackson, president, The Land Institute



“Lynn and I often argued, as good collaborators should, and we wrangled over the intricate finer points of self-regulation, but always remained good friends, perhaps because we were confident that we were right.”--Dr. James Lovelock, contributor, and author of The Vanishing Face of Gaia



“It was life―profligate, teeming life in all its weirdness―that held the magic for her, not this featherless biped with its confused aspirations. Lynn intuited and doggedly gathered evidence to show that most anything we two-leggeds take special pride in―our capacities for cogitation, conviviality, and culture―had been invented, eons before, by the microbial entities that compose us.”--David Abram, contributor, and author of Spell of the Sensuous

About the Author

Dorion Sagan is author of numerous articles and twenty-three books translated into eleven languages, including Notes from the Holocene: A Brief History of the Future and Into the Cool, coauthored with Eric D. Schneider. His writings have appeared in The New York Times, The New York Times Book Review, Wired, The Skeptical Inquirer, Pabular, Smithsonian, The Ecologist, Co-Evolution Quarterly, The Times Higher Education, Omni, Natural History, The Sciences, Cabinet, and Tricycle. He edited Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel, a 2012 collection of writings addressing Margulis's life and work.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Sciencewriters
  • Hardcover: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing; 1 edition (October 19, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1603584463
  • ISBN-13: 978-1603584463
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #589,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
If you know about Margulis' work you still need to read this book because it is a multifaceted view of this magnificent person and her ideas and puts her work into a context that enriches our understanding. I venture to guess that, if you are like me, you might have thought you knew about it and will be amazed to find how little of its totality you actually had a hold of.

I write this review at very special time for me for the book Jim Coffman and I wrote together (Global Insanity: How Homo sapiens Lost Touch with Reality while Transforming the World, being published by Emergent Publications) is being set in type as I write this and we expect to see the proofs any day now. The two books are related in many ways even though they are very different as well. Margulis and I were very close in age, I being the older by about two years. Our paths crossed in many ways starting with our origins in Chicago. She; however was a prodigy going to the Lab School at the University of Chicago, while I was a working class type and only began to grow out of my background in college at the Illinois Institute of Technology. I finally came in touch with the University of Chicago in 1960 when I entered graduate school there. My contacts with her work and people we had interacted with in common came even later. Hence the reading of this book was very revealing and made me very much aware of my own shortcomings as my career slowly developed to the point where I was sharing interests with Margulis unaware of tem beforehand.

"She attended the University of Chicago at age 14 having entered "because she wanted to go and they let me in".
At 19, she married astronomer Carl Sagan. Their marriage lasted 8 years. Later, she married Dr. Thomas N. Margulis, a crystallographer.
Read more ›
1 Comment 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Having suffered ridicule and marginalization for her eventually vindicated theory of symbiogenesis early in her career, Lynn Margulis was ever ready to assist those swimming upstream against intellectual conformity. She became a champion of underdogs, apparently crazy geniuses, and intellectually bold but socially timid researchers. She was willing to defend theses that may or may not be correct because she believed in science and the necessity of hearing, weighing and properly evaluating ideas before tabling, rejecting or accepting them. Several of the essays collected here are written by those--in various disciplines, not just science--whom she took under wing and encouraged. Her example throws light on the shame of scientific practice today, with its crippling institutionalization and funding rituals. Margulis is remembered in this volume for her evidence-based search for truth, her strong opinions, and her generosity. Funny, informative, and diverse, these essays collectively describe how real science and real learning really get done. Highly recommended.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a thoughtful volume....some personal reminiscences, but mostly descriptions of Margulis's work from stellar scientists.
Lynn Margulis will eventually been known as one of the most important scientists of the 20th and 21st centuries. Symbiogenetics will come to be understood as THE mechanism (sic) of evolution for all Earth's planetary beings. This collection is not to be missed...as Lynn Margulis is by so many.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The clearest and most accessible reprise of Lynn Margulis' life and work emerges through this gathering of two dozen accounts from her colleagues and friends. I found not only rich appreciations of the character of her personal genius, but also the most focused explications of the meaning and significance of her scientific endeavors. A compelling portrait of greatness beyond singular category as scientist, teacher, friend, and soul.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This collection of essays about the great scientist Lynn Margulis is a "must-read" for anyone interested in science and how it really works. Each author (many of whom are world renowned scientists and thinkers) gives a snap-shot of Lynn Margulis and one of her many interests, while collectively they give a picture of a scientist who could see the details and the big picture at the same time, who wasn't afraid to challenge the establishment and whose brilliance and persistence changed how we look at life, evolution, and the Earth.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
What is so remarkable about Margulis is that, as a 29-year old biologist, she took on the establishment in her discipline by promoting a radical and fundamental hypothesis, even as she carefully gave credits to earlier publications of others who foreshadowed her ideas. This combination of scrupulous scholarship and intellectual daring is very admirable and rare. This book is a well-deserved tribute to someone who embodied scientific virtue.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
A member of the US National Academy of Sciences and winner of the National Medal of Science, Lynn Margulis was an inspirational scientist who maintained an open mind to new scientific and cultural ideas throughout her lifetime. She pioneered the modern understanding of symbiosis as an evolutionary and biological force. In the early years in particular she was opposed in this by the more traditional neo-Darwinian establishment, leading to inevitable friction. But in later years most scientists grasped the complementary nature of both traditions in modern evolutionary biology. She was a great and generous friend and support for other scientists, in particular novel thinkers, who faced the inertia and displeasure of the establishment, helping them to get their views more widely aired. She was also a tireless friend and educator of the lay public, in her lectures and her many popular science book publications, often co-written with her son, Dorion. Just before her untimely death, Lynn was named as one of the twenty most influential scientist alive - and one of only two women on this list, which included such luminaries as Stephen Hawking, James Watson and Jane Goodall.

I was privileged to know her as a friend as well as a colleague. The world simply will not be the same without her fearless heart and indomitable spirit.

This wonderful and timely book is edited by Dorion, whose father was Carl Sagan. There are contributions by many famous living scientists, including James Lovelock, Niles Eldredge, Jan Sapp, which illuminate her passion, explore her arguments and debates with other leading thinkers, such as Stephen Jay Gould and, in the no-holds barred face-off with Richard Dawkins in the so-called "Battle of Balliol" at Oxford.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel (Sciencewriters)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel (Sciencewriters)