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Lysistrata by [Aristophanes]
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Lysistrata Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 29 customer reviews

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Length: 108 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

ARISTOPHANES, the most famous comic dramatist of ancient Greece, was born an Athenian citizen in about 445 B.C. Forty-four plays have been attributed to Aristophanes; eleven of these have survived. His plays are the only extant representatives of Greek Old Comedy, a dramatic form whose conventions made it inevitable that the author would comment on the political and social issues of fifth-century Athens. This Aristophanes did so well that Plato, asked by the tyrant of Syracuse for an analysis of Athenians, sent a copy of Aristophanes' plays in reply.<br>&#160;&#160;&#160;&#160;<br>His earliest play, the Banqueters, won the second prize in 427 B.C. when the dramatist must have been less than eighteen years old, since, as he notes in the Clouds (423), he was too young to produce it in his own name. Another early play, the Babylonians, criticized the demagogue Cleon, who responded by subjecting Aristophanes to legal persecution, and as the author charges in the Acharnians, Cleon had &quot;slanged, and lied, and slandered and betongued me . . . till I well nigh was done to death.&quot; Nevertheless, in the Knights (424), he renewed his attack on the popular Athenian leader and won first prize in that year's contest. Plutus (388) was the last of the author's plays to be produced in his lifetime.

Product Details

  • File Size: 175 KB
  • Print Length: 108 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 16, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00847HQJY
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,052 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Daryl on December 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
I get a perverse kick out of the fact that I can share a hearty laugh about someone's genitals with someone a thousand years ago. The fact that both myself and a stadium full of men in ancient Greece were laughing about the same things has an unnatural appeal to me. Almost enough to forget the fact that we were undoubtedly laughing for very different reasons.

It's interesting to see how audiences now react to this play in contrast to how it was originally meant to be viewed. In the twenty first century Lysistrata has been elevated to the point of feminist masterpiece and yet during its time it was written to show that the war was so insensible that even a woman knew it. Ow. Well, no matter, chauvinistic punch line at the end or not that does very little to diminish the fact that this is one hell of a funny play. And there's a timeless quality to it too - time and time again I found myself laughing and thinking that any one of these little melodramas could have happened any where in practically any time. There's a part early on in the play where one of the characters is dissatisfied at pacing up and down the square waiting for her fellow conspirators to arrive. If only this had to do with a sale on shoes or shopping she laments then they would have been here at the crack of dawn! But tell them it has political tones to it and they're all an hour late. Oh, have truer words ever rung down about the state of politics and modern man from any age? There's an odd comfort in knowing that in hundreds of years of human folly the state of politics hasn't changed much.

An absolute must read, not only for those stuffy literary types but for anyone looking for a good read, and dare I say it, a genuine laugh.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Wars have hounded our planet as long as we have had history, and before. This story from ancient Greece, set during the time of their city-state struggles,rings true still. Wars betwen competing princelings, wars between religious faiths, wars for territory, for power,wars set off by ego-maniacs are still with us. The women following Lysistrata lead an amusing and intensely serious way to peace.
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Yet another assignment from my Comic Spirit class that I grumbled about reading but am so glad I did. The war between women and men to stop the incessant wars Greek men were fighting against each other is so ripe for puns, double entrees, and just flat out comedy makes one realize these people were just like us. Loved it!!!
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The story:

The story was ok. Difficult to understand because of the differences between our modern American culture and the ancient Greek's. Comical and light hearted. Gives good insight into the lives of women during the time period. Wouldn't read it again for pleasure, though.

This edition for the Kindle:

Great. No problems with it at all. Translation seems fine. Plus the price is good. If you need to read this story, don't be afraid to download this edition to do it.
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I really didn't like this translation. Even though it was a short play I felt like I was slogging through it. Also, not very accessible to the average reader considering the translator decided to use the Scottish highlands dialect for the Spartan character.
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I wouldn't have predicted such a bawdy play to have been inspired by war, especially the Peloponnesian War. I wonder what the original audience thought when they first the play. How did the audience react to the play's premise that the denial of sexual favors would bring a swift end to the war? The play is a quick, entertaining and thought-provoking read.
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Format: Paperback
Lysistrata is a great play written by Aristophanes. Lysistrata, the main character, gave the women of Athens a voice. They were viewed as sexual objects and nothing more; they were to be submissive and were powerless. This play showed that women can be as powerful as men. It's inspiring because if women today were belittled, they could come together and make a change. However, women today have power and rights, as they can run for president. Lysistrata brought peace in the east, therefore, if women ever felt like they could intervene, they should go for it.
As for the obscenity, it gives the men something to laugh at or say "oh, that's something I would do/say." This play is definitely for a mature audience. All in all, it is a good story that supports feminism and while giving a laugh, discusses a major issue.
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Format: Paperback
I did not read this 2010 edition of this play, but have just read the play from a different source and thoroughly enjoyed it. Coming from an era full of plays and other works of literature denouncing women, this play is a refreshing example of female empowerment. With women taking control by withholding sex from their husbands in order to get them to bring an end to the war, they bring a great deal of humor and some good lessons about war. I highly recommend this to anyone who prefers not to read plays, because it's a hilarious romp.
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