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MAKING COCOA FOR KINGSLEY AMIS (FABER POCKET POETRY) Paperback – International Edition, 1999

4.4 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Wendy Cope was born in Erith, Kent. After university she worked for fifteen years as a primary-school teacher in London. Her first collection of poems, Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, was published in 1986. In 1987 she received a Cholmondeley Award for poetry and in 1995 the American Academy of Arts and Letters Michael Braude Award for light verse. Two Cures for Love: Selected Poems 1979-2006 was published in 2008. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.
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Product Details

  • Series: Faber Pocket Poetry
  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: FABER AND FABER; New Ed edition (1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0571202500
  • ISBN-13: 978-0571202508
  • Product Dimensions: 4.4 x 0.3 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,691,225 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
There once was a poet named Wendy,
Who I desperately wish would befriend me.
For her out-of-print rhymes
I would give my last dimes,
But Amazon thinks they're not trendy.
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Format: Paperback
The fantastic Wendy Cope, with her glib wit and casual satire, has written a beautiful book -- funny, tender, and sarcastic, she turns the literary status quo (two hundred-odd years of pontificating males) on its head and leaves it hanging. She's just far too clever for the boys and we love it. Just buy it. Laugh out loud.
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By David Archer on October 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
I will be forever thankful for the day I picked up this book just for a look ,I read one poem then took it straight to the desk to buy. The next day I went back and bought Serious Concerns another collection of poems by Wendy Cope.
There just so damn good. Some are funny. Some are sad. Some are this .Some are that. Some are the other. Everyone I ever lent these books to loved them and then went out and bought their own copies. I cant lend you my copies (lost them moving to NewZealand) but I can recommend that you buy them now.
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Format: Paperback
"Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis" is a dream book of poetry. So many of these poems just naturally slap a grin on your lips. Curiously, the title poem did come from a dream and it's the last one, four lines long; it's the only poem in the third part of this collection.

This collection is basically divided into just two parts. The first is pure pun, satire, and fun. (Some of the best ones from the first part are beautifully performed by K J Lermontov on YouTube.) The second is more adulterated -- intellectual -- though there are plenty of puns, satires, and fun, too. The second part is a series of poems invented by Mr. Strugnell, an older male poet invented by Wendy Cope.

One of the best in the series is sonnet "(vii)":

Indeed 'tis true. I travel here and there
On British rail a lot. I've often said
That if you haven't got a first-class fare
You really need a book of verse instead.
Then, should you find that all the seats are taken,
Brandish your Edward Thomas, Yeats or Pound.
Your fellow-passengers, severely shaken,
Will almost all be loath to stick around.
Recent research in railway sociology
Shows it's best to read the stuff aloud:
A few choice bits from Motion's new anthology
And you'll be lonelier than any cloud
This strategem's a godsend to recluses
And demonstrates that poetry has its uses.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis" rules the world! Wendy Cope can write a line as plain vanilla as "I haven't finished yet" and put it in a context that makes me fairly weep for joy. She can entitle a poem "Giving Up Smoking" and turn the thing into a boss love poem. She can synopsize "The Waste Land" in limericks in such a sterling way as to get me thinking that durn near the whole point of "The Wasteland" was to make possible, better than half a century later, Cope's synopsis. And then, having delighted me no end with light verse, she can up and compose "3 a.m.", compelling me to write bunches of friends and ask them to flesh out the narrative implied in that sad, sad poem, just so's I can see what all narrative shapes Wendy's sad can take in my friends' heads and hearts. I wish I'd gotten to Wendy Cope earlier. I'm durn glad I got to her at last.
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