Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Macroeconomics (4th Edition) 4th Edition

3.1 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0131368736
ISBN-10: 0131368737
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$22.74
Condition: Used - Good
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book shows signs of use around the edges and covers, and may contain writing/underlining/highlighting. May have used stickers on covers. Supplementary material not guaranteed if applicable. Ships directly from Amazon and qualifies for free Super Saver Shipping!
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
55 Used from $7.98
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
More Buying Choices
12 New from $41.41 55 Used from $7.98

There is a newer edition of this item:

Macroeconomics (6th Edition)
$236.01
(1)
Temporarily out of stock.
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Consumer Reports
Access expert, unbiased product reviews from web or app. Learn more
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Williamson is the Chester A. Phillips Professor of Financial Economics in the Department of Economics, Tippie College of Buisness, University of Iowa, and is a Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.  He received a B.Sc. in Mathematics and an M.A. in Economics from Queen's University in Kingston, Canada, and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He has worked as an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis and the Bank of Canada.  Professor Williamson has published scholarly articles in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Review of Economic Studies, the Journal of Economic Theory, and the Journal of Monetary Economics, among other prestigious economics journals. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 720 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 4th edition (February 21, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0131368737
  • ISBN-13: 978-0131368736
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 1.1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #52,865 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
After reading this book no one will ever complain that macroeconomics lacks micro foundations. This book first explains the microeconomics of intertemporal goods and labor markets and goes on to create an intertemporal general equilibrium economy (with two periods for simple exposition). Then Wiliamson shows how growth theory and business cycle theories are applied in this general equilibrium economy. This is by far the most fun and understandible way to teach undergraduates about growth and business cycles at the intermediate level.
Williamson also lays out "stylized facts" of the business cycle, including comovements, and he critiques different business cycle theories based on whether they can replicate those comovements in the data. This book comes closer than any other intermediate text to replicating how modern macroeconomics is done.
Ch 8 which explains Solow and endogenous growth models is by far the most understandible and educational of any text on the market, since Williamson does the models in discrete time rather than continuous time. If you're a professor that wants to teach undergraduates growth theory and/or growth dynamics SO THAT THEY REALLY UNDERSTAND THEM DEEPLY and ENJOY THE LEARNING EXPERIENCE, this is the book to assign.
Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was the assigned text for a class on business cycles. The professor used this text as background and for reading assignments, He followed the general outline of the text and filled in with more mathematical examples and additional details. Were things may have been a bit inconstant we analysed why they were or were not.

I feel the text added to the understanding of the course, generally the text was clear and the numerous graphs added greatly to the understanding of the material. I could not see a bias to the text and it's material as some other reviews have stated, it seemed to hit Keynesian, Monetarism, and others. Generally there is far more material in the book than can be covered in a single course. The 4th edition at this point (mid 2011) is very up to date with examples and details from the real world.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I really like the topic of macroeconomics and I was looking forward to reading this textbook for class. However, it is extraordinarily dry compared to macroeconomics textbooks on college levels that I read in high school. It's confusing in that it is far wordier than it needs to be and the graphs are often found a page or more away from the text that describes them, making for tedious page flipping and re-reading.

There are some interesting call-out boxes that give you a break from the tedious graph descriptions and confusing equation formations that I have enjoyed. The author brings up several real-world examples for economic problems and I found those fascinating enough to keep me plugging through a mind-numbing read. Also, it's all the exact same color. I don't expect lively pictures in a macroecon textbook, but it feels like my soul is shriveling up after a few chapters of the same hideously-colored graphs. If you're planning on writing a macroeconomics textbook-- I beg of you! Please vary your color scheme!

As with most college textbooks, the end-of-chapter resources are not super helpful, because there is no answer key. So you can try to test yourself, but you won't know if you're on the right track. Read through the chapters thoroughly, highlighting the important parts. It makes it so much easier to study/skim later, since the majority of the text is seemingly wordy fluff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book provides a decent overview of intermediate macroeconomics and is overall quite clear and concise. The intuition for the theory covered is conveyed well, and the author gives a fairly balanced treatment of the various theories. More quantitative examples in the text would have been helpful. One criticism is that there are quite a number of typos in the text, questions at the end of the chapter, and exercises.
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Rather than using the precise math language to explain the economy, the author created an awful lot of BS throughout each single chapter of the book. I spent more than 3 hours on average reading just one chapter of the text, and when I finally finished and looked back, I found myself not able to recall the core stuffs, because they are totally buried under all those stupid BS's. But you know what, it's fine to have written more than necessary, because that may actually make the book more reliable when the readers are facing some hardcore detail oriented econ exams. However, that is not the case, for example, in chapter 13, there is a full explanation of the sticky price model, and right after the model there is this sentence "...money is not neutral in the short run because of sticky prices (or wages),...." And the author doesn't go on and do a similar experiment for the effects of sticky wages. Believe me, after reading all those tedious craps before the model, you will think that sticky prices and wages are the same thing when you finally reach this sentence. So it seems to me that this book is lack of necessary details for some important concepts, in which case it's not as reliable as I thought it would be. So given it's time consuming BS's , I'm giving a one.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews