Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 13 left in stock.
Sold by Amazing Prime Express and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Madame Bovary has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: The case shows some wear and tear. The DVD is missing the original artwork.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.69
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$29.96
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Achilles' Reel
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Madame Bovary

4.4 out of 5 stars 52 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Mar 06, 2007)
"Please retry"
1
$29.96
$13.95 $4.95
DVD
"Please retry"
1
$15.04 $48.99
DVD
(Jun 23, 2015)
"Please retry"
$19.00

Deal of the Week: "Harry Potter Hogwarts Collection" on Blu-ray and DVD
This week only, save on the 31-disc collector's edition containing all eight Harry Potter movies and more than 45 hours of special features. See more
$29.96 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 13 left in stock. Sold by Amazing Prime Express and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Madame Bovary
  • +
  • Wuthering Heights (1939)
Total price: $39.75
Buy the selected items together

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

Madame Bovary (1949) (DVD)

Gustave Flaubert's scandalous, banned, classic novel comes to the screen, the story a beautiful French woman whose passion and will are far too great for her time--Madame Bovary. 1857, France. Young Emma (Jennifer Jones) marries an older widower (Van Heflin) to escape her family, but she soon becomes disillusioned with her marriage and her husband. Drawn first into a passionate, if chaste, relationship with young lawyer Leon Dupuis (Alf Kjellin), then a sexual relationship with an aristocrat Rodolphe Boulanger (Louis Jordan) and finally a desperate affair with Dupuis, Emma realizes that she may succeed in her adultery but she will never be able to escape the stifling prison of her time, class and sex. James Mason stars as the author, Gustave Flaubert, in an introduction and epilogue set during the author's obscenity trial. ...

]]>

Special Features

  • Vintage Pete Smith specialty short Those Good Old Days
  • Classic cartoon Out-Foxed
  • Theatrical trailer

Product Details

  • Actors: Jennifer Jones
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Closed-captioned, Subtitled, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, Portuguese
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: March 6, 2007
  • Run Time: 114 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000KJU132
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #85,924 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Madame Bovary" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Branden H. O'neal on February 25, 2007
Format: DVD
"Madame Bovary" is one of those rare films that only gets better with age; with each viewing, one notices new elements to appreciate. Vincente Minelli crafted a perfectly literate interpretation of Gustave Flaubert's famed novel. The following is a breakdown of the unifying elements which make "Madame Bovary" so spectacular:

DIRECTION: Minelli's keen eye for composing unforgettable scenes is perfectly realized with "Madame Bovary". The ballroom sequence, with its dizzying 360 degree camera angles, is an exasperating metaphor of Emma Bovary's existence and serves as a symbolic foreshadowing of what is to become of her. C'est magnifique!

SCREENPLAY:Robert Ardrey's screenplay is deftly paced and packed full of poignant dialogue.

CINEMATOGRAPHY: As mentioned earlier, the ballroom sequence is amazing-perhaps the most intricate and inspired of its kind in cinematic history. Robert Planck's moody black & white photography make it all possible. Planck captures Emma at the height of all her fantasies--gazing upward at her reflection, being adored and adulated by throngs of male suitors, in an ornate mirror hanging on the ceiling--brilliant composition!!!

ART & SET DIRECTION: All of the Rococco and Baroque grandeur of 1850s France is expertly represented in "Madame Bovary".

COSTUME DESIGN: Costume designer, Walter Plunkett, also known for his Academy Award winning work in "Gone With the Wind", created costumes for Jennifer Jones which rival his masterpieces for Vivien Leigh. Plunkett complimented Jones saying, "She has exquisite shoulders like Vivien Leigh", and further complimented her in the film by designing a show-stopping ball gown that emphasized her "exquisite shoulders", to say the least.
Read more ›
Comment 58 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
If you have read the great Flaubert novel and are expecting a film to equal it in its grandeur, then you may be disappointed. However, if you can settle for a beautifully filmed Hollywoodized adaption of the novel, then this is it. First of all, the cinematography and the sets are excellent. You can tell that they are sets but they are very well done. The acting, especially Jennifer Jones in the title role, is outstanding. Supporting cast is fine also with the always memorable Gladys Cooper and the incredibly handsome Louis Jourdan especially stand out. And look for Ellen Corby (Grandma Walton) as the maid. Two scenes are highly notable - the ball sequence is spectacular and the scene where Emma awaits Rodolphe on the deserted windswept streets in the middle of the night is beautifully done. Overall, a stunning acheivement by director Vincente Minnelli.
Comment 30 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Madame Bovary is a difficut piece to translate to film. It is very easy for the heroine to become either dislikable: either willfull (the PBS version with Francesca Annis) or peevish (the Isabelle Hubert french version).

What Minnelli so masterfully and ironically captures here is the "dream machine" that drives Madame Bovary (and society) to be dissatisfied with their daily lives, to want and need more and therefore to be perpetually unhappy with what they have. Of course, Minnelli was part of that machine for Hollywood, which is the irony. Here he uses the period-correct analogy of romance novels and magazine ads (and to a lesser extent operas and plays) as vehicles that feed and drive Bovary's dissonance with her reality. (James Mason as Flaubert, too!)

The irony that Flaubert was faulted for denegrating the french woman is fully captured here as well. This version still doesn't get to a real meaty statement of realization that men were not considered immorral or corrupt it they have affairs and forget about their children; but women were. Personally, I think that may have been one of Flaubert's real points - this same behavior would have been tolerated and venerated in a male.

Where this production succeeds so brilinatly over the others I mentioned is in the writing and performance of Emma. She is clearly delineated as being a victim of the commercials of her time - the ultimate consumer, and therefore very identifiable. Jone's own personal charm also factors in here. Her fresh innocence and desire to be liked and to entertain come through the role and make her sweeter.
Read more ›
1 Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on July 18, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
Incredible cinematography that conveys and reflects a part that all of us posses or at the very least dream about. It is portrayed to such an extent that we feel exactly like the main character, however shameful she may be. Filmed in 1949, it is suprising that such a novel was able to be made into a movie at a time of strict censorship without destroying and conveying even more the message the author intended for the reader. Jenifer Jones portrays the main role disturbingly beatiful and relatable to the veiwers in such a way that we feel exactly how or what she feels, suffers, and deludes herself as. When I first veiwed it 12 years ago, it affercted me so much so that I had to veiw the movie, or at least certain scenes almost everyday such as the part when she meets Louie Jordan in her husbands office.The reaction on her face to the meeting is so impressive that you know exactly what she is thinking even as she remains silent.The Vaubyessard ball is a spectacular one s! hot sequence that summarizes the whole book in that one scean. Without even having read the book you get a very clear picture of what the story conveys and intends even if the movie does not at times chime in with the sequence of events in the book. A five star rating for the movie and Miss Jones for an incredibly relatable portrayal. A must read and must see movie for those who may want to see a part of themselves that does exist in all of us. END
2 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video