Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Mafiaboy: How I Cracked The Internet And Why Its Still Broken First Edition Edition

2.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0670067480
ISBN-10: 0670067482
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$0.01
Condition: Used - Good
In Stock. Sold by Silver Arch Books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book has a small amount of wear visible on the binding, cover, pages. Selection as wide as the Mississippi.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
14 Used from $0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
More Buying Choices
5 New from $63.22 14 Used from $0.01 1 Collectible from $19.95
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Viking; First Edition edition (September 30, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670067482
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670067480
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,578,196 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By T. Quiring on December 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Mafiaboy - How I Cracked The Internet & Why It's Still Broke reads more like a "what I did last summer" essay combined with a school research project than a true authoritative look at the problems inherent with security and the internet. I found Mr. Calce's tale to be built more on ego and teenage swagger than on remorse. Granted, he did learn some good coding skills in his early career, but I find it hard to believe that an otherwise seemingly well-behaved kid had no foresight into the wrongness of his activities. At times I did wonder who he was trying to convince - himself, his family, or readers - that his foray into piracy, hacking and bot herding was nothing more than an innocent quest for knowledge gone wrong.

While I understand the lure of power and being able to do something no one else (or very few) can do, Mr. Calce broke the law, and he deserved all he got. Although he cautions others against following in his footsteps as the end result is not worth the brief intoxication of power, my respect falls on the side of the RCMP and FBI agents who put an end to Mafiaboy's thoughtless attacks. I do not feel that his inclusion of very basic internet security information in any way redeems the millions of dollars in damage and lost time he caused.

I freely admit to harbouring ill-feelings towards script-kiddies and bot herders - feelings developed through firsthand experiences as our own network fell victim to botnet DDoS attacks. That said, I tried to not let that experience influence my opinion of this book, and I think that for the most part I succeeded. I was able to read this book more from an educated point of view in regards to internet and network security rather than as a neophyte. However, try as I might, I found very few redeeming qualities in Mafiaboy.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
I was an actual member of tnt/phorce and I recall things VERY differently. MB asked others to help him packet the sites that were mentioned in the news, and most of them said F' off. Mafiaboy wrote no tools at all, most of any attack programs were written by phifli, sinkhole and a few select others. He did use a semi-public scanner to 'own' machines (solaris boxes, irix) and just either put bots on them, or used them with trinoo. Before trinoo, he simply logged into a bunch of machines and manually smurf'd or UDP flooded targets.

I think he just wrote this because nobody wants to hire him, and he wanted to make money off of other people's accomplishments. What's sad is he made money off the following people:

ShadowKnight
phifli
dreamwalk
sinkhole
CORE (group)
conflict (group)
madcrew (group)
NoName (group)
chrome (group)

.. And countless others. By attacking all of those sites, he initially was the result of many people just giving it up (ie: phifli, dreamwalk, myself) because he attracted unwanted attention to the scene. I'm pretty sure Mshadow was the one who leaked the logs of him attacking the sites to the RCMP/FBI and that's what got him busted. There is much hatred towards him for this book, him attacking corporate companies. I showed this book to someone who was around at the same and his jaw dropped as the BS that is in this book.

Also, the media portrays MB as some superhacker. HAH. Far from it, he's a victim of the public's stupidity.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
"Mafiaboy" was what computer professionals typically call a "script kiddie" - someone who gets their kicks from running programs written by others, in an attempt to block other peoples websites, or gain access to their machines. They are the computer equivalent of vandals, with little or no understanding of how the programs they run actually work and Mafiaboy fits this profile precisely, as his own book proves. This is a turgid account of how he ran a few programs he downloaded off of the internet, took down a couple of websites, and then got arrested. The fact that he now makes a living as a "security consultant" is laughable - I doubt he does much more than reiterate common sense statements such as "don't run software of unknown provenance" or "don't click on links in dodgy looking emails", as on the strength of this book he knows very little about computer security from a programmers perspective.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Michael Calce was a kid when he discovered his love for computers. The machine is what inspired him, what motivated him to learn and master it. His notion of ethics was still flimsy; he had no idea of the destructive power of hacking and networking.

Mafiaboy relates a teenager's quest for power online as the rest of his life falls apart, and how the reality of his actions came crashing down on him with the full force of the law. We get an intimate glimpse into the chaotic blend of confusion, bravado, fright, and enthusiasm that resided in him. Silverman's prose is simple and clear, faithful to the speech and logic of a nerdy kid.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book arrived in good time but it was delivered to our mailbox during rain and was soaked through. A plastic lining in the envelope would have prevented this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse