Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.64
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book is in used condition. Your satisfaction is guaranteed!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Magic Hour Mass Market Paperback – September 9, 1998

4.0 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$0.03 $0.01

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Good news for Isaacs's fans: she is back in top form, using the mystery formula that made Compromising Positions a standout, and again exhibiting her wickedly observant eye and flair for ricocheting, pitch-perfect dialogue. The setting this time, the various sections of Long Island's Hamptons (N.Y.), allows her to depict the tension between the hardworking locals, many of whom live on the edge of poverty, and the snooty summer people, phony Manhattan culture hounds and social climbers. Movie producer Sy Spencer is clearly among the latter, and when he is shot by the side of his glitzy Southampton swimming pool, homicide detective Steve Brady is not surprised to discover plentiful evidence of widespread resentment and hatred of Spencer. Among the suspects are Spencer's current mistress and the star of his film-in-progress, who knew she was about to be dumped; one of his ex-wives, a sexy failed screenwriter; and a Mafia gangster who was a childhood friend. As he pursues the investigation, Brady must cope with his own demons, the residue of service in Vietnam: he is a recovering alcoholic and druggie. He is also trying to work up enthusiasm for marrying his fiancee, a boringly nice WASP schoolteacher, and when he finds himself obsessively drawn to Spencer's cast-off wife, he imperils the case and his own reputation. Isaacs spins her tale with brio, again proving herself the master of neat surprises and perceptive character portrayal. 150,000 first printing; $20,000 ad/promo; Literary Guild and Doubleday Book Club main selections; author tour.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A witty and sexy page-turner."

-- -- Pittsburgh Press

"Holds its edge."

-- -- Glamour

"If you're in search of pure entertainment, pick up a copy of Magic Hour."

-- -- New Woman

"Snappy plot." -- -- Entertainment Weekly

"The same witticism-wrapped . . . center that always drives Isaacs's fans dotty."

-- -- Kirkus Reviews

"Vintage Isaacs. . . . Magic Hour is like polishing off an entire box of chocolate-covered chocolates. . . . Fun." -- -- New York Times Book Review

"Magic Hour does exactly what it's supposed to do -- entertain." -- -- Chicago Tribune

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 450 pages
  • Publisher: HarTorch; First Edition edition (September 9, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061099481
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061099489
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 3.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,705,216 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
Although it is not my favorite by Susan Isaacs, I feel compelled to mention that this is one of her few books written from a male character's point of view, and it works great. Steve Brady is a "real" person all the way around - a former alcoholic, he is apprehensive about his current relationship and his numbing everyday existence, when BAM, he unexpectedly falls head over heels for someone he never suspected would make him feel that way. I love Bonnie's character - I appreciate that she's not beautiful or sexy, just a real good person. I love the build up to their climax, and I think Steven Brady learns so much about himself in the process.
Comment 13 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Steve Brady, the narrator is a Long Island cop and recovering alcoholic with the perfect, twenty-something fiance. Why, then, can't he stop thinking about Bonnie Spencer, the ex-wife of the victim and the prime murder suspect? The description of this plot on the cover sounded shmaltzy and stupid, but being an Isaacs fan, I read it, and highly recommend it.
Before long, you forget the author is a female, because the male narrator is so believable. The characters are well-drawn, even the minor "supporting" characters. My only quibble is that I figured out the "shocking" actual murderer looonnnggg before the last few pages when it is revealed. Still, the book keeps you wanting to turn pages long past Midnight, and I felt sorry when it ended. You can't ask much more from a book.
Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"HE was a man who fled from the past..."

"SHE was a woman who lived in it..."

No, wait...

"FOR every man there is a woman who holds the key to his past..."

"FOR every woman, there is a man who can open her future..."

**********

OK, this was never made into a movie, and Susan Isaacs is a much better writer than me, but her two strong protagonists seem just right for the big screen. Detective Stephen Brody is a modern film noir hero, straight out of Bogart: He's a cynic who doesn't play by the rules, he has his own moral code (that, nevertheles,p lays well with readers,, and when he falls for a woman, he falls hard. That is, if he can remember his alcohol-induced trysts. See, Brody has a past, no, make that a PAST! ...possibly undiagnosed PTSD out of Vietnam, subsequent heavy-duty alcoholism, and a strangely askew family history, including a would-be social climber of a mom on the fringes of upper-class Long Island.

Ms. Bonnie Spencer is the castoff spouse of rich guy producer Sy Spencer, neatly killed (it looks like a professional hit) near the location of his newest movie. He's having an affair with the lead, who's fooling aroun with the director, even the technical and artistic staff are fooling around with each other--it's wonder anything got made (meaning the movie, of course). Brody arrives en scene, and he and his partners in Homicide focus on three suspects, eventually zooming in on Ms. Spencer. Ms. Spencer was a slightly promising screenwriter when she met Sy Spencer; she's an impoverished hack living la vida promiscuous when Sy Spencer reenters her life.
Read more ›
Comment 12 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on April 23, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It's a little too easy to figure out "whodunit" in
this mystery, but otherwise, this is one of those
books that kept me thinking, even after I
read the last page. I wanted to know what happened to Steve
and Bonnie after they solved the murder and
proceeded to lead ordinary lives. The greatest
thing about "Magic Hour" and all of Isaac's books
is the personal relationship you develop with the
characters. A solid read, even if the ending is a
little predictable.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on March 12, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read 'After All These Years' and thought that was good, but 'Magic Hour' makes it seem slow in comparison. This book is extremely witty and intelligent, and even though it moves quickly, it seems as if nearly every line contains some humorous or perceptive observation. The narrator, Steve Brady, is instantly likeable, despite how flawed he is. Similarly, Bonnie is far from a 'perfect' person, yet Isaacs manages to make her a very appealing character. If I had one complaint, I would've preferred Isaacs had made BOTH Steve and Bonnie less promiscuous in their past (not a gender thing, it's just a question of safety!). Anyway, I would highly recommend this book. I don't think the mystery is obvious at all, but regardless, the puzzle is only one aspect of this story...which is definitely an example of talented writing. Don't miss this one!
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My introduction to Susan Isaacs came when I read an excerpt from "Almost Paradise" in a magazine many years ago and immediately rushed to find the book. Then I read the book, threw it away, and vowed never to read anything by that author again. Fast-forward a few years when I discovered "Shining Through" in a Waldenbooks, and realized that if I didn't want my husband to drag me out of the store, I'd have to buy the book. I did, and loved it. "Shining Through" became almost a Bible of how to "show not tell" in writing; how to write emotions so they come through as real. But then I'd remember "Almost Paradise" and that would keep me from buying any of Isaac's other books. Finally, a few weeks ago I got a wild hair and decided to see if she wrote anything else decent. So I read "Magic Hour."

It's decent, but only just.

To begin with, "Magic Hour" is supposed to be from the perspective of a male of close to 40 years old, but the narrative voice sounded EXACTLY like the narrator in "Shining Through," a female of 30. And the manner in which the writer "shows" is exactly the same as in "Shining Through," but since it's set in modern day rather than the 1930s/1940s of "Shining Through," it includes a lot of less-than exemplary language. This doesn't bother me so much as that the language purported to be "this is the way a hard-boiled cop talks." Well, my son was a cop for several years--a military detective, and if you're familiar with the military, you know they know how to use colorful language. And they do, but not in every single sentence, as this book does. A lot of the language seems to be just for shock effect. This makes it hard to believe.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews