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  • Magic
  • Customer reviews



on August 8, 2016
Magic is one of Bruce’s best records. It is an extremely strong suite of songs, not a weak one on here. Bruce is in excellent voice, the playing is great. Thematically, the record has a sense of feel, some anxiety of the times paired with a few great pop songs. Save for 2-3 tracks, this is a layered sound rock record. This review is written almost 9 years after the release and it is strange to consider why this was not a bigger hit. Perhaps it’s release in the fall, could see this as a summer release, with the pop songs I’ll Work For Your Love and Girls in Their Summer Clothes.

Gypsy Biker, Last To Die and Devils Arcade reflect on the outcomes of persons that went, some not to return, to Iraq.

I have both the vinyl and CD. Vinyl packaging is gatefold with a lyric album liner and nice label. Vinyl is 180G. Very nice, but my copy had some surface marks, I believe because of the extremely tight fit.

Main problem with this release, and it is a big one, is the mastering is awful. It is the best (worst ?) example of the compression engineers are using to get a loud sound out of a recording. The dynamics get lost and there is distortion due to the compression and having all the sound compacted together. The vinyl is hardly an improvement over the CD wich can sometimes be the case. In fact it seems almost worse.

Hard to believe it got released this way. Hoping this will get a proper mastering / uncompressed release. Perhaps even just digitally. An outstanding record.
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on May 29, 2013
We have always been fans of the Boss......But we have lost track over the last few years; I mostly listen to Contemporary Christian most times, and my wife likes oldies(Oldies, like 50's-60's); She said she heard a song on the radio, not an older song, and not a new one, and she really liked it. Girls in Their Summer Clothes, were the words she could remember; I typed them in on You-Tube, and sure enough, a video of the song, showing the cover of an album by Springsteen called Magic was displayed. She looked at several places and wasn't able to locate a copy; I typed it in on Amazon, and sure enough, I found an almost new copy for a great price, Some of the reviews were negative, from i suppose, an audiophile perspective. Complaining that structurally and sound-wise that it was hard for them to listen to. I guess they haven't had to listen to a static filled AM radio straining to hear one's favorite song......waiting for it to come on. When I got the CD I listened to it; Pure Springsteen...Another great work. Many great songs....Then I heard a song: You'll Be Coming Down......As I listened, It almost made me cry....What A Great Song.....But when the Sax solo came on....Pure Clarence Clemons.....He will be missed by all, having been with the Boss for over 40 years. And it sounds great.
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on June 19, 2015
i've been listening to this a lot lately, and I have to say it doesn't grow tired at all. Except for Gypsy Biker, which is a sonic mess, and Devil's Arcade, which is one of those "who needs a melody when you have profound lyrics to recite" tracks that we have to endure occasionally from global rockstars, every song is terrific to listen to. I think the most upvoted review, Mike London's, nails it when he notes how the marriage of pop hooks and arrangements with often downbeat lyrics mirrors BITUSA. If this had come out in the late 80's or early 90's, it would have been quadruple platinum at least. But the demographics and business have changed. Still, this is easily the most enjoyable of his post-BITUSA career, which now encompasses over 30 years.
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on June 2, 2008
With each passing year, album and tour, Bruce Springsteen is making the strongest case for himself as being the most consistant and reliable American rock artist ever. Bruce and the E Street Band have already established themselves as the greatest live rock band ever, and only Dylan rivals Springsteen's ability to craft songs from the heart with a keen social observance. Even when Bruce goes off the trail with introspective, folk-oriented efforts like 'Devils and Dust' or the delightful, uptempo 'Seeger Sessions', the results are always pleasurable and successful. He's never made a less-than-worthwhile album.

'Magic', I would argue, is his best since 'Darkness on the Edge of Town'. Like 'Born in the USA', the album is deceiving in a way, as others have commented here, because the music is so friendly and rocking and yet the lyrics are full of anger and sadness. 'Radio Nowhere' explodes out of the speakers and just trashes the state of contemporary FM American radio. 'Last to Die' blasts the Bush Administration's Iraq war policy. 'Magic', the title track, seems to lament collective selfishness in society and rising racism. 'Gypsy Biker' documents the lost soul of a returning war Vet. The hidden track, 'Terry's Song', is a moving tribute to a departed, loved friend. Its poignancy is doubled by the fact that it could just as well been written for recently departed E Street Band organist Danny Federici - "when they built you Brother, they broke the mold...". Undeniably, this is American rock songwriting that simply doesn't exist anymore, with the exception, again, of Dylan.

I don't understand the criticisms I've read here of Brendan O' Brien's production. No album I've heard in the last couple of years booms so proudly or invites you into its wrath. Case in point - "Girls In Their Summer Clothes" sounds like Brian Wilson with modern technology, highlighting the friendliest Bruce vocal performance since "Hungry Heart", and enrapturing a wonderful tribute to lost summer innocence. If you're going to criticize production, try Madonna's latest, 'Hard Candy', which sounds like a mechanical disco-meets-going-out-of-business-porn-shop.

As you can probably tell, I love this album. If you are sick of manic-depressive techno bands with their hair hanging in their faces and hip-hop artists going on-and-on about urban ruthlessness and just want to hear music that makes you feel human again, 'Magic' is your choice. It is indeed magic.
4 helpful votes
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on November 8, 2017
Very comfortable, very good. I received it soon Very flexible They work perfectly, literally overnight. They are delivered on Sundays. Beautiful son used
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on March 20, 2011
Like a million people I heard and still listen to his 70's and 80's songs on a regular basis. But through the 90's and beyond I kinda lost track of Bruce. I'm sure I speak for alot of people. Enter 2007, I'm listening to internet radio and keep hearing "Livin' In The Future" and "Radio Nowhere" over and over...and loving them. To my ears they're the most energetic and infectious songs of his in years. Ordered the album and quickly came to love the rest also. What man can't enjoy "Girls In Their Summer Clothes"? I also really like "You'll Be Comin' Down" and "Long Walk Home". I liked this album so much I bought the following album "Workin' On A Dream" too, though it's not as good as this is. If you've heard "Born To Run" one too many times and need a more recent Bruce fix, this will work some magic on you.
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on November 30, 2007
Anyone who thought Bruce Springsteen might have nothing new to offer should think again. The songs on his new CD, Magic, are far more thoughtful--haunting, really--than his earlier work. The title song, in particular, has an almost menacing edge to it that is hard to miss. It opens with a dark reversal of calliope-like strains that hint at what's to come, and the magician's illusions the song describes become more and more menacing as the song proceeds. It is hard not to read this song's musical and lyrical sleights of hand as political commentary, especially when followed by a song that asks "who'll be the last to die for a mistake." Yet, although much of this new work seems to offer a cautionary tale, there's still room for a sliver of hope, reinforced by strains of such songs as "Girls in Their Summer Clothes," and "Living in the Future," in which we are reassured that "none of this has happened yet." The music on Magic has enough of Springsteen's familiar rhythms to keep long-time fans more than satisfied, and its reflective, at times melancholy, underpinnings are enough to keep you awake in the middle of the night.
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on May 12, 2014
Magic is an underrated Springsteen album. Radio Nowhere, Girls in Their Summer Clothes and Long Walk Home are real classics. The other tracks are strong and memorable and not just filler. This is in album that can be enjoyed as an album. Radio Nowhere is an outstandingly satisfying song---perhaps one of the best opening tracks in several decades.
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Bought this sometime ago but just getting around to reviewing it. I thought I had done it already.

I have always liked Bruce Springsteen. The quality of his writing and music have always been top notch. That being said, there is something that is missing here, and I cannot quite put my finger on it. Suffice to say though that this is still a superior release when compared to 99.99% of the dreck that is played in radio today.

I do recommend this CD, but not as much as I would others.
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on June 20, 2010
Coming five years after "The Rising," Springsteen and the E Street Band's most recent effort, "Magic," is well worth the listen. Though it doesn't measure up to the triumph of their previous album, there are quite a few good songs, and the whole thematically holds together well.

My favorite track is, without a doubt, "Long Walk Home," which combines nostalgia for home with a recognition of the ways America has sometimes gone wrong, and the knowledge that it sometimes takes a long, hard time to get back to something you've lost.

Other excellent songs on the album are "Radio Nowhere," "You'll Be Comin' Down," and the title track, "Magic". There's only one song I habitually skip, "Gypsy Biker." The rest are all good listening.

If you like Springsteen's recent work, you'll like "Magic."
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