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Magna Carta... Holy Grail [Explicit]

July 9, 2013 | Format: MP3

$13.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
5:38
30
2
4:05
30
3
3:09
30
4
4:03
30
5
3:57
30
6
4:02
30
7
2:28
30
8
4:34
30
9
4:02
30
10
0:51
30
11
5:33
30
12
0:55
30
13
3:12
30
14
3:50
30
15
3:33
30
16
5:03
+
Digital Booklet: Magna Carta... Holy Grail
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 9, 2013
  • Release Date: July 9, 2013
  • Label: Roc Nation / IDJ
  • Copyright: (C) 2013 S. Carter Enterprises
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 58:55
  • Genres:
  • Format: Explicit Lyrics
  • ASIN: B00DU1WSHO
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars 369 customer reviews
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,084 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
...to grown folk hip-hop.
He could set the standard. But, unfortunately, he's half-step-sleep-walking.
From this master wordsmith, we have here:
Wack, run of the mill beats.
Stale "made it against all odds", "don't hate" subject matter and delivery.
Extra, unnecessary obscenity...
I mean, there's so much going on in the world, including with black males, and ol boy has NOTHING new to say? SMH.
Yet another example of the sorry state of hip-pop.
I used to buy Jay automatically, sound unheard. But not no more. Half-stepping, entitled millionaires will WORK for my little dollar.
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Format: MP3 Music
Ok i'm going to be honest, the production is a 4 1/2 - 5 stars, his rapping/rhymes are about 1 1/2 - 2 stars and i'm being very generous. the album feels very rushed and like he just threw something together. it's almost like he did a "why even bother folks will buy it because i'm hov" type effort. if you just like to hear nice beats and could care less about a rap flow it is worth the money, but if you care about a complete product with meaningful lyrics then this is not the album for you.
11 Comments 104 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Jay-Z and Kanye West are two of the closest collaborators in music and have dropped arguably the two marquee hip-hop releases of the summer. It's astounding then how diametrically opposed the two albums are, not only in sound but also in underlying philosophy. Kanye's is a minimalist, industrial work with almost no marketing campaign, seemingly entirely unconcerned with sales. Meanwhile, Jay-Z has given us among the most commercial albums of our time ("platinum before release") with Samsung as his benefactor. He leans heavily on his tried and true muses for lyrics and the usual suspects for beats, but he manages to grow just enough to keep himself above the fray. If Yeezus left you out in the cold, MCHG is chicken soup for the hip-hop soul.

All the themes you'd expect from a Jay-Z album are here: His rags to riches story, throwbacks to his days of selling drugs, his loyalty to his roots, jabs at his detractors, his absentee father, his young family. All are in rare form. The lyrics remain potent and when his skill lags his swagger and presence buoy the track. What other rapper could grunt his way through a third of a track and make it work? (see: Versus).

But amidst of all of the expected are the bits of growth that showcase an evolution sometimes unexpected from the genre. While rappers often flaunt their philanthropy, Jay anticipates giving without recognition ("The purest form of giving is anonymous to anonymous/ We gon' make it there, I promise this.") Whereas so much rap is concerned with the trials of fame, Jay-Z dismisses the minor annoyances of celebrity ("This ___ ain't work/ This is light work/ Camera snapping, my eyes hurt/ ______ dying back where I was birthed.
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8 Comments 76 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: MP3 Music
I listened to it and thought to my self if this album was free I would give it one star. I am sure happy I did not pay anything. With efforts like these, Jay-z will you please go away and stop wasting everyone's time. Lyrically uninspiring, rife with pseudo complexity, unintelligent, incoherent, uncomfortable flow, despite what people are saying very little thought, if any went into lyrics composition and structure. The only redeeming quality on a track or two was background and even that should have been used on someone else. As a consumer you should be more demanding of the people that you place product loyalty with. As for me I would give the same amount of money as Jay-z put in effort with this piece of crap-ZERO.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
Jay-Z's Magna Carta Holy Grail quickly became one of the most anticipated new releases of 2013. Jay-Z shocked the world by announcing a 'sooner than later' release of his newest effort. The problem with Magna Carta Holy Grail is that it fails to live up to the hype or the consistency that has characterized Jay-Z's previous efforts. Over the course of 16 songs, Jay-Z sometimes pleases while at other times he falls short of making a splash. There is no "Empire State of Mind" or "Run This Town" this time around; single "Holy Grail" hasn't had enough time to build a buzz. Ultimately, even some of the better, more memorable tracks are accompanied by a rub of some sort.

"Holy Grail" opens the effort, assisted by Justin Timberlake. Timberlake sounds soulful as expected, but seems to grab more spotlight than Jay-Z, the feature artist. Jay-Z does perform two verses, but they pale compared to Timberlake's contributions which are more interesting. Things are better on "Picasso Baby", in which Jay-Z proclaims himself to be the new 'Picasso'. The production has an old-school, east coast sound that is suited for Jay-Z. The best moment is the production switch-up that provides a backdrop for Jay's best, 'realest' verse, Verse 3 ("...They try to slander your man / on CNN and Fox..."). On "Tom Ford", Hov solutes the fashion designer stating "I don't pop molly, I rock Tom Ford..." on the catchy hook. It's not an outright classic by any means, but it's a worthwhile listen. "FkWithMeYouKnowIGotIt" follows, but finds neither Jay-Z or guest Rick Ross at their most substantive. The hook is catchy enough, but simple and shallowly based in bragging.
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3 Comments 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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