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Magnolia Electric Co Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 25 customer reviews

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Magnolia Electric Co.
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Audio CD, Import, March 4, 2003
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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Farewell Transmission
  2. I've Been Riding With The Ghost
  3. Just Be Simple
  4. Almost Was Good Enough
  5. The Old Black Hen
  6. Peoria Lunch Box Blues
  7. John Henry Split My Heart
  8. Hold On Magnolia


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 4, 2003)
  • Original Release Date: 2003
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Secretly Canadian
  • ASIN: B00008AJQ4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #61,681 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
READ THIS BEFORE YOU BUY THIS ALBUM!! PAY THE EXTRA MONEY AND GET THE JAPANESE IMPORT. Why you ask? Because it has a bonus track titled "The Big Game Is Every Night." As with the other eight tracks that are on the US release, it is incredible. ALSO FIND AND PURCHASE THE VINYL. Why again you ask? Because the vinyl or lp version includes a bonus CD of Jason Molina's acoustic versions of the the of the entire album, even the bonus track. Even if you don't have a turn table, the fourteen or so bucks you spend on it will be worth the nine track CD you get. After roughly two months of continuous listening, I firmly believe that this is a landmark album in music. If there was any justice in today's world of musical mediocrity, this artist and album would without a doubt be the recipient's of numerous Grammy's.

***UPDATE***
02/17/07
I am still loving this album. Jason Molina is an unacknowledged talent that deserves to be recognized.
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Format: Audio CD
...not long enough. That's my only complaint about this masterpiece; it seems to go by too quickly, too quickly for the long spring twilight drive through the desert which it should accompany. There are so many voice-prints in the music singing through Jason Molina and his conspirators on this record: Gram Parsons, Neil Young, Alex Chilton, Don Williams, Hank Williams, old REM, Dylan, Olson-era Jayhawks, Enrico Morricone. But to say it sounds quite LIKE any of these people would be a disservice. It is much more than the sum of these suggestions. It's a very distinct critter from the other work of Songs: Ohia, but in an organic, not jarring way. It rocks much harder but still haunts you as much much as anything on "Ghost Tropic." It's impeccably sequenced. You keep waiting for the filler song; the song that breaks the mood, and the album is over before you've heard it. While the record is short the songs are niiice and loooong. They linger with you, not letting you go, like a cute and crazy drunk chick at a VFW hall wedding dance in Riverton, Wyoming. She might even be the bride, and you're thinking about taking her home as she rasps along with Ferlin Husky "...wings of a snow white dove..." and cries softy in your ear... Man, you're on you're OWN about her, but I can tell you, should take this album home with you. Then hit the road...
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Format: Audio CD
If you've read my previous reviews, you're probably familliar with my method of buying albums: wandering around Amoeba records for hours, then deciding on some random album because it has a really neat cover (and if I'm feeling especially critical - cool song titles). This has resulted in a few poor choices, which I'll leave to your imagination, but also some gold nuggets, and this record is one.
I should point out that I'm a big fan of nocturnal, atmospheric music with a distinctly rural-american tinge, and that pretty well describes this album. My knee-jerk classification (if that kind of thing matters to you) would be to say alt-country, but lumping Songs: Ohia in with the like of Whiskeytown and Son Volt doesn't quite gel, especially given the strong blues influence throughout.
To dive into more specific analysis, let's break down the record into its components. The voices jump out immediately. Jason Molina leads the pack, singing lead on three quarters of the albums eight tracks. He channels Neil Young to an extent; they share the same kind of drawling intensity, but whatever comparison you want to make, the sound is still a remarkably pleasant one.
The voices on the remaining two tracks are a mixed bag. The male vocal on 'The Old Black Hen' (I THINK this is Lawrence Peters, based on the breif liner notes, but I'm not positive) pours it on a little thick for my taste, but bigger fans of a classic country (definitely an applicable term on this track) might dig it more than I do.
Scout Niblett's vocals on 'Peoria Lunch Box Blues' on the other hand, steal the spotlight.
Read more ›
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Format: MP3 Music
The depressing news reaches us today of the sad but not totally unexpected death of the great Jason Molina. As an artist he embarked on what seemed like a never ending tour until he had to stop in 2009 to deal with severe alcoholism and yet another attempt at rehab. Over the weekend whilst resting up on a farm in West Virginia Jason Molina died of organ failure due to alcohol consumption and yet another brilliant musician is taken from us at the criminally young age of 39. Often compared to Neil Young the music of Jason Molina went well beyond that of a mere copyist. He was a true original, always located on the fringes of success and a man whose recognition that he was "paralysed by emptiness" led him towards destruction. In this 2003 masterpiece (the term is used with a sense of understatement) his then band Songs" Ohia recorded "Magnolia Electric Co" an album so good they later took up the title as the new band name. It is Americana gold and includes the uber powerful seven minutes of the epic "Farewell Transmission", the quiet wonder of one of his greatest songs "Just be simple", the wasted country rock of "Hold on Magnolia" and two excellent songs written by Molina but sung by different band members "The old black hen" and the desolate "Peoria Lunch Box Blues". Molina's music had a dark heart and a sad core. He sung about it, lived it and possibly died of it. The best tribute to the man would be to keep his music alive not least because of the hefty medical bills left for his family to pay.Read more ›
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