Buy Used
$2.92
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All Discs are inspected and guaranteed. All dispatched with 1 - 3 working days from the UK
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Mahler: Symphony No. 9 In D Major (Great Recordings of the Century)

4.0 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, June 6, 1989
"Please retry"
$27.49 $2.92

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

In addition to conducting the first performance of Mahler's Ninth, Bruno Walter also made the first recording of the score, and it is one of the most remarkable phonographic documents of this century. The recording, with an incandescent Vienna Philharmonic on the stage, was made at a concert in the Musikvereinssaal on January 16, 1938. Walter, then 61, and his colleagues, some of whom had played under Mahler, give an overwhelming reading inspired not only by the memory of the composer, but by the grim situation in Europe and Austria at that moment. Here is Mahler on the brink, coming to us from a time when the world itself was on the brink. Listening to the account is like stepping back in time, and can be a chilling experience. The sound is magnificent, with an utterly remarkable depth and presence for a recording more than 50 years old. --Ted Libbey

Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. Symphonie No. 9 In D Major: I. Andante commodo
  2. Symphonie No. 9 In D Major: II. Im Tempo eines gemächlichen Ländlers
  3. Symphonie No. 9 In D Major: III. Rondo - Burlesque
  4. Symphonie No. 9 In D Major: IV. Adagio


Product Details

  • Orchestra: Wiener Philharmoniker
  • Conductor: Bruno Walter
  • Composer: Gustav Mahler
  • Audio CD (June 6, 1989)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: EMI
  • ASIN: B000002S0R
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #251,424 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Bruno Walter Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By B. Yoon on July 21, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I am forever grateful for the insight that Fred Gaisberg had in recording this concert, Walter's last before the Anschluss. One must remember that soon after this concert, Walter, along with the other Jewish musicians, were in grave danger. Due to this unfortunate situation, it resulted in an emotionally charged performance by one of the finest orchestras in the world at its peak.
George Szell considered the string playing of European orchestras during the time between the two world wars to be the ideal standard that all should strive for. I strongly believe that this recording is the supreme example of that level of playing. Not only does one hear superb bowing technique, one hears exceedingly subtle nuances very clearly as a result of the orchestra's committment to a unified musical message. All the little slides are just gorgeous.
Mahler's 9th is one of the ultimate human expressions of farewell. He looks back on his tragic-laden life and still accepts his inevitable fate in peace. This concert gives a new meaning to that farewell and this makes it such a poignant recording. My favorite along with Horenstein- LSO and Abbado-VPO.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
I hesitate to recommend this as the top choice for anyone looking for their first Mahler 9. If you have not heard the Ninth at all before, this recording by Walter is not the one for you. Barbirolli's and Haitink's (with Amsterdam) Ninth combines good sound with excellent playing. And Karajan's ninth with the BPO is also a good place to start, although there are those who argue that Karajan did not produce the Mahlerian sound with the BPO.
For those who already have a Mahler 9 and wish to supplement their already valuable collection with historical recordings and alternative interpretations, well, what are you waiting for? Grab this CD. You can go no more historical than this. This was Walter's last performance with the VPO before he fled Austria to escape the Nazis. One hears in the music the tension of those last remaining days before the war, or so I imgaine.
The playing of the orchestras might draw different opinions from critics, the sound is admittedly of low quality ( though in view of the date - 1938, the engineers in charge of the remastering must have done wonders), but mix them all together, and the result is potent electrifying music! Listen to the first movement and feel your goose pimples rise, for this was what it did to me on the first listening, and still does.
Get this, in this remastering or any other. It is worth your while.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is a truely fascinating recording, for several reasons: It has been recorded 52 years ago in Vienna (just weeks before the Anschluss) by Walter who had to leave the country soon after that January 16, 1938. Walter conducted the first performance of this symphony 1912 (two years after Mahler's death) with many of the musicians who play in the 1938 recording. Remastered from the original 78rpm shellac this recording brings unexpectedly rich sound (though Mono). And I don't need to talk about the thrilling interpretation of Walter. For me this recording is a Must for any Mahler lover.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
One can dispute that it is always great recordings of the century that EMI has reissued in its "Great Recordings of the Century" collection, but Bruno Walter's conducting of Mahler's 9th Symphony, recorded live in Vienna on January 13, 1938, certainly is. First, because it is the premiere recording of the symphony, Mahler's penultimate (that's counting the unfinished 10th), first sketched during the summer of 1908 as the composer was working on Das Lied von der Erde, then completed in draft form in the summer of 1909. Second, because Walter has unique legitimacy in this work. He was then Mahler's favorite disciple and there were long exchanges of correspondence between them in that period, although Henry-Louis de la Grange, in his mammoth Mahler biography, doesn't record that Walter discussed the score with the composer as he did with Das Lied. Finally, Walter premiered the piece on June 26, 1912, shortly after Mahler's death, and already with the Vienna Philharmonic. I hesitate to call Walter the closest recipient of Mahler's intentions as can be and his most truthful interpreter, not only because this recording dates from more than a quarter century after the premiere and almost thirty years after the work's completion and any possible conversation Walter might have had with Mahler about it, but also because Mahler himself considered that the composer's intentions were never definitive and were only those expressed on the day of performance. So there can be no certainty that Walter's interpretation in 1938 can give an idea of the way Mahler would have conducted it, had he not died.Read more ›
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category