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Mainstream Import

4.8 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Import, March 18, 1997
$31.98

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 18, 1997)
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Msi
  • ASIN: B000005RFB
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,589,283 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Quiet Sun Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Quiet Sun was Phil Manzanera's pre-Roxy Music endeavor. (Few people realize that he was originally Roxy Music's sound person. He joined Roxy Music when their original guitarist--David O'List, formerly of the Nice--was not working out.). Quiet Sun came perilously close to gaining their own record contract in 1971, but their complexity and radical style did not gel with the appetites of the record execs they auditioned for. They broke up in 1972, and when Manzanera had money and studio time, they reformed. Roughly speaking, this CD is a blend of Tony Williams' Lifetime, Soft Machine (Manzanera's main influence was Soft Machine organist Mike Ratledge), and perhaps 1973-1974 King Crimson (with some instrumental Velvets thrown in). It is a shame that the album was a one-shot deal--they apparently have other material from the sessions--as the playing and intensity are awe-inspiring. You'll never look at Phil Manzanera the same way again; I guarantee it. Of all of the musicians on this CD, only Charles Hayward has continued in a progressive artistic bent (through This Heat, Camberwell Now, solo efforts, and recently Massacre--an amazing player.) If you like aggressive, thoughtful, impressive playing (think a rockier Soft Machine with comparable instrumental chops) you'll love this! Get it!
Gary Gomes
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Format: Audio CD
The Soft Machine influence is obvious, but in execution Quiet Sun created something completely different. Phil Manzanera simply sears on guitar here, leading a Canterbury-style jazz-rock band with all the edge of "Red"-era King Crimson, AND the Latin passion of Santana. The production and mastering on this disc are amazingly hot, the compositions interesting and diverse, and the performance is brimming with spontaneity and band chemistry.

As a fan of the edgier sorts of progrock, this CD qualifies as one of my prize possessions. A magical album, too bad they didn't do another--but it's doubtful they could have topped THIS sizzling slab of raw beauty.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This 2011 reissue of Quiet Sun's, Phil Manzanera's pre-Roxy Music band's, 1975 reunion album is the one to get - for several reasons;

- Here is the original album cover art (although the format here is as a small hardback book)
- You get the whole of the original album, plus,
- 4 previously unreleased demos, over 30 minutes of music (3 from 1970 by the original group, 1 from the '75 sessions).
- 8:01 minutes of the band talking about recording those demos.
- And, 50 pages of "liner notes"; photos, historical commentary, reject letters, and various album reviews.

Obviously this is a quality production and a must for Manzanera fans (or fans of British 70's prog-rock). The original album was/is great, and it's always been a bit of a mystery for me how it came about and fit into Manzanera's other work - until now! It is fascinating to discover they recorded this during the same sessions as Diamond Head (old knowledge), but coming in after that band had finished for the day and sneaking recording time without EG management's knowledge! It was to be Quiet Sun's first and only album, mostly first-take recordings without much rehearsal, after 3 years of being disbanded...Pretty amazing (and that it's still well worth listening to).

The demos here add a whole new appreciation of that creative month of January 1975. Three are from Quiet Sun's first (unsuccessful) attempts to attract a recording contract. There is a playful, adventurous quality to these demos (they also had a sax/flute player then). These early tracks all have a rough, even stiff sound, but what they may lack in technical prowess they make up for with enthusiasm and energy.
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Format: Audio CD
Phil Manzanera's spin-off project from Roxy Music is almost entirely instrumental and features Phil's sonic guitar onslaught in a way never heard with any other group. It also features Brian Eno with most of what would become 801. A must have for Manzanera fans and prog rock afficianados.
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Format: Audio CD
Quiet Sun was Phil Manzanera's pre-Roxy Music endeavor. (Few people realize that he was originally Roxy Music's sound person. He joined Roxy Music when their original guitarist--David O'List, formerly of the Nice--was not working out.). Quiet Sun came perilously close to gaining their own record contract in 1971, but their complexity and radical style did not gel with the appetites of the record execs they auditioned for. They broke up in 1972, and when Manzanera had money and studio time, they reformed. Roughly speaking, this CD is a blend of Tony Williams' Lifetime, Soft Machine (Manzanera's main influence was Soft Machine organist Mike Ratledge), and perhaps 1973-1974 King Crimson (with some instrumental Velvets thrown in). It is a shame that the album was a one-shot deal--they apparently have other material from the sessions--as the playing and intensity are awe-inspiring. You'll never look at Phil Manzanera the same way again; I guarantee it. Of all of the musicians on this CD, only Charles Hayward has continued in a progressive artistic bent (through This Heat, Camberwell Now, solo efforts, and recently Massacre--an amazing player.) If you like aggressive, thoughtful, impressive playing (think a rockier Soft Machine with comparable instrumental chops) you'll love this! Get it!
Gary Gomes
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