Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$6.10
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Malcolm Paperback – January 1, 1994

3.4 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$1.99
Paperback, January 1, 1994
$17.59 $0.01

Pierced by the Sun
A gripping tale of murder and redemption by the author of Like Water for Chocolate. Learn More
Available from these sellers.
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Serpent's Tail (January 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1852423684
  • ISBN-13: 978-1852423681
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #902,208 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Samer A. Al Taher on April 27, 2010
Format: Paperback
Malcolm is a novel which, because of its measured simplicity, is extraordinarily complex. It is a highly stylised fable in which the surreal is presented as entirely conventional. There is an extreme sense of disconnection, of alienation. This is a depiction of a society where the individual has lost his sense of belonging and where meaning has become arbitrary. It is also extremely funny.

The story begins in picaresque fashion, with Malcolm being introduced in successive chapters to a range of unusual individuals. Malcolm is first presented to us sitting on a bench day after day, waiting. Just waiting. He has lost his father - literally so, as he doesn't appear to have died, he simply isn't there - which one would ordinarily take to be symbolic of the end of childhood or reaching maturity, but this clearly isn't the case with Malcolm. Paradox is at the heart of this novel. Malcolm is an innocent who cannot engage with the world. He is taken in hand by the peculiar Mr. Cox, who arranges for him to meet, in turn, a range of his acquaintances.

Malcolm orbits these people's worlds and everything shifts. Everything, that is, except Malcolm, who remains throughout impervious to the dramas building around him. These people are eccentric, extreme, anomalies, and at certain times surreal. Each of these extraordinary characters is introduced as coolly as though they were merely a range of everyday functionaries.

Yet all of this is told in a deliberately flat style, almost banal, and the characterisation is strictly two-dimensional.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Consider Saint-Exupery's Little Prince. But, instead of meeting odd and colorful characters on fantastic alien planets, he's meeting odd and colorful characters in a fantastical Manhattan. Both are naifs who balance innocence with unexpected wisdom and insight. Both ask questions that lead to uncomfortable, amusing or surprising answers. You get the general idea.

Can this be twee and arch and a little bizarre? Sure. Can it be sly and witty and sometimes loaded with meaning and gravity and despair? Also, yes. The larger point is that if you like risk taking fiction, dry humor, and a little bit of vinegar on your fries, this is an interesting and rewarding book. It doesn't really go anywhere and it doesn't really do anything, but that's not its point. It isn't an attempt to invest weight or emotion into the lives of people in TriBeCa or Brooklyn Heights who are agonizing over which private school would be best for their yuppie larva. (see, Ghostbusters II). It hardly even involves characters that are arguably "real". It's an adult fantasy, a New York City dream, a cheerfully skewed tour through the author's idea of New York, and an occasionally savage indictment of certain New York types.

Not to put too fine an edge on it, but the joke goes that there is a Purdy renaissance even ten years. Arguably the first proponent of American magical realism, Purdy's work also reflects the ups and downs of critical response to the efforts of sexually transgressive writers, from the fifties through the end of the century. So, let the renaissance begin. This "comic novel" is from 1959; the searing works that would establish Purdy as a major figure in American letters didn't come along until the 60's and 70's.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Consider Saint-Exupery's Little Prince. But, instead of meeting odd and colorful characters on fantastic alien planets, he's meeting odd and colorful characters in a fantastical Manhattan. Both are naifs who balance innocence with unexpected wisdom and insight. Both ask questions that lead to uncomfortable, amusing or surprising answers. You get the general idea.

Can this be twee and arch and a little bizarre? Sure. Can it be sly and witty and sometimes loaded with meaning and gravity and despair? Also, yes. The larger point is that if you like risk taking fiction, dry humor, and a little bit of vinegar on your fries, this is an interesting and rewarding book. It doesn't really go anywhere and it doesn't really do anything, but that's not its point. It isn't an attempt to invest weight or emotion into the lives of people in TriBeCa or Brooklyn Heights who are agonizing over which private school would be best for their yuppie larva. (see, Ghostbusters II). It hardly even involves characters that are arguably "real". It's an adult fantasy, a New York City dream, a cheerfully skewed tour through the author's idea of New York, and an occasionally savage indictment of certain New York types.

Not to put too fine an edge on it, but the joke goes that there is a Purdy renaissance even ten years. Arguably the first proponent of American magical realism, Purdy's work also reflects the ups and downs of critical response to the efforts of sexually transgressive writers, from the fifties through the end of the century. So, let the renaissance begin. This "comic novel" is from 1959; the searing works that would establish Purdy as a major figure in American letters didn't come along until the 60's and 70's.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?