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The Man with the X-Ray Eyes

4.4 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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(Jul 08, 2008)
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$9.29 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Eye drops let a doctor see through clothes, skin, casino cards.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Morris Ankrum, John Dierkes, Kathryn Hart, Jonathan Haze, John Hoyt
  • Directors: Roger Corman
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Cheezy Flicks Ent
  • Run Time: 79 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0016J5E5K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #132,855 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Roger Corman's "X" The Man With The X-Ray Eyes is a great sci-fi horror film made for only $300,000. The title might have you think it's an over the top B movie but the material is taken very seriously with a lot of help from Oscar winner Ray Milland as Dr. Xavier.
Dr. Xavier is a surgeon and scientist who is being funded to improve eyesight and creates a type of serum that enables X ray vision. With pressure to stop funding his experiments Dr. Xavier decides to use the eye drops on himself. This is the interesting Sci-fi angle that turns into somewhat of an adventure when Xavier accidentally kills a colleague and ends up on the run.
Becoming obsessed to see more and more Xavier continues to use the drops and uses dark glasses to cover his eyes. He makes money working at a carnival. At first the concept has it's perks, seeing through clothes and that sort of thing but soon Xavier can see through the skin, organs, and can see walking skeletons. He can see the beginnings of cites. This is where the horror concept comes in the film. It's brilliant because it knows what you can't see, the unknown is usually the most frightening to us. We do get glimpses of what the Dr. sees but at the end and on the run as he stumbles into a church sermon, his eyes completely black he says he sees beyond the blackness to the center of the universe and it isn't pleasant. We the viewers can fill in our own worst imaginable fear of what lurks in the dark or in this case the unknown because the Dr. never sees the dark anymore even when he sleeps he sees through his eyelids. Another very smart aspect is using the eye itself, it's such a sensitive part of our bodies.
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Considering the budget for the movie (around $300,000) this movie turned out fairly decent. That is not to say this is great movie - I would say more intriguing than great - but it still is enjoyable. I watched this by myself first to make sure it was as I remembered it then I watched this with some friends at our monthly movie night. When it's warm I set up my 10 foot screen outside and watch a movie plus some cartoons, 1930-40's movie shorts, movie trailers, even some of the old drive-in intermission stuff - I try to keep it about 3 to 3.5 hours in total usually.

And since it's close to Halloween I picked this one as since all of this is my idea I always decide what we watch. Surprisingly everyone at least liked it. I always talk 3 or 4 minutes before we start and before the 'main' showing - trivia about the movie, etc. 2 or 3 people had seen this on Sammy Terry's TV show (local horror icon who showed stuff mostly from the 1930 thru the 1970's) that was on from about 1960 thru the early 1980's.

When I told them about the rumored ending ('I can still see') it got a pretty big reaction.

The basic idea is pretty good but the budget pretty much killed any real chance of having a truly good movie. The picture and sound on this DVD was pretty good. I would rate this a good solid B level movie a 7.25 to 7.75 out of 10 - recommended especially if you get it from you local library!
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This 1960's movie has good production values for a low budget Roger Corman movie.
Imagine my surprise on this MPAA approved movie when I found the last five seconds missing. This was the climax, for crying out loud. This is not the fault of the seller or Amazon. If you are thinking about this one, you might want to think twice. Who wants to buy a movie with the ending altered or omitted. A shame. Thanks.
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Roger Corman is best known for a series of eight inexpensive yet unexpectedly effective films vaguely based on the works of Edgar Allan Poe and released in the 1960s. All but one of these starred Vincent Price; THE PREMATURE BURIAL, the third film in the group, starred Ray Milland. Corman and Milland worked well together, and Corman quickly cast Milland in a non-Poe film, X—THE MAN WITH THE X-RAY EYES. Shot in about three weeks on a slim budget, the film became one of Corman’s most widely praised works, receiving positive words from “the serious critics” and raking in some fairly big bucks at the box office, too.

Dr. Xavier (Milland) is experimenting with solutions that will allow the human eye to see normally invisible spectrums of light. At first, the results are amusing: when he attends a party, he discovers he can see right through their clothes. Later, the results seems to be potentially beneficial: he is able to correctly diagnose a child’s illness and save her life. But when he accidentally kills a co-worker (Harold J. Stone), Dr. Xavier goes on the run, sinking to performing a “psychic” act in a carnival and then coerced into acting as a “healer” by a vicious blackmailer (Don Rickles, in his first film role.) A fellow scientist and possible love interest (Diana Van der Vlis) attempts to pull him back from the void—but has Dr. Xavier gone too far to return?

The cast is very attractive, with Rickles giving a surprisingly nasty performance and Diana Van der Vlis, an actress most often seen on stage and television, is both charming and effective. But most interesting are the special effects. As Dr. Xavier’s use of the drug progresses, the appearance of his eyes change—and the audience often sees things from his point of view.
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