& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by investorshares and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
From Mars to Sirius has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The case shows normal wear. The CD shows very minor wear if any at all.
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.55
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$17.89
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: US SELLER: HEAR AND SEE MEDIA
Add to Cart
$25.08
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Ebazon
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

From Mars to Sirius

4.6 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, August 22, 2006
$17.81
$17.81 $12.51
Vinyl, April 15, 2014
"Please retry"

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream millions of songs FREE with Amazon Prime. Start your free trial.
$17.81 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by investorshares and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • From Mars to Sirius
  • +
  • Way of All Flesh
  • +
  • L'Enfant Sauvage
Total price: $40.79
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Gojira possess distinct modern elements and can be compared to a host of peers. I hear Fear Factory during the latter half of Ocean Planet and Strapping Young Lad in The Heaviest Matter Of The Universe. Mastodon are included, too, as well as a production reminiscent of Meshuggah. Out of twelve songs, most contain sections that are verifiable earthquakes. Unlike earthquakes, however, the onslaughts are predictable but no amount of preparation will ready you for the upheaval. Besides the gentler Unicorn and From Mars, every other opus fully encapsulates what Gojira are about and what kind of damage they are capable of inflicting. Whatever the case, From Mars To Sirius is exemplary in a number of ways. Adorers of any of the bands mentioned in this review are encouraged to take a stab at this, because Gojira are simply too powerful and competent to ignore. Though much of the record's appeal leaves me searching for descriptive words and phrases, rest assured that the impact and subsequent devastation are both unavoidable and irreparable. You might see it coming, but it'll still knock you on your ass. It's one of the better things I've heard this year. - Metal-Observer.com.

About the Artist

Originally dubbed Godzilla, after the scaly green Japanese film star of yore, the Duplantier brothers (guitarist/vocalist Joe and drummer Mario) and fellow band members Michel Labadie (bass), and Christian Andreu (guitar) quickly released several demos, ultimately changing the band’s name due to legal concerns, yet still relentlessly tearing forward towards the band’s first album, Terra Incognita.

Sounding as heavy as the sci-fi film artillery used against the band’s namesake back in the 60s, GOJIRA followed up its debut with The Link, a huge and utter success throughout France and all of Europe. So successful was the band’s take on the world’s earthly state of affairs, the environment, and plenty more, that GOJIRA followed it up with The Like Alive, a DVD capturing the band’s massive concert sound, solidly-executed live show, and showcasing the throngs of French and European fans the band has gained since its humble beginnings.

With over 8,000 copies of The Link and more than 2,500 copies of its DVD companion sold domestically in France without large distribution, Listenable Records took note and released a remixing of the record, and in 2005 released From Mars To Sirius, GOJIRA’s most concise, thoughtful, and heavy record to date. Recorded at home in the studios of the Milans, From Mars To Sirius may feature mentions of dragons, the angers of the ocean, the threats to the world’s environment, and it does feature a flying whale on the album’s cover, but it all ultimately meets the band’s goals. All the while, GOJIRA continues to barrel forward hand-in-hand with revolutionary insights and a heavy-as-concrete sound, going against the grain and creating a sound uniquely their own.

  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
5:32
Listen Now $0.99
 
2
30
4:18
Listen Now $0.99
 
3
30
5:48
Listen Now $0.99
 
4
30
2:09
Listen Now $0.99
 
5
30
6:54
Listen Now $0.99
 
6
30
3:57
Listen Now $0.99
 
7
30
7:44
Album Only
8
30
7:47
Album Only
9
30
6:52
Listen Now $0.99
 
10
30
2:24
Listen Now $0.99
 
11
30
5:37
Listen Now $0.99
 
12
30
7:50
Album Only

Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 22, 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Prosthetic Records
  • ASIN: B000GUJZC8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #112,385 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Gojira Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Listening to "From Mars To Sirius" is like being locked in a windowless room in a mental hospital with a stereo blaring albums by Meshuggah, Morbid Angel, Soilent Green, Krisiun, Neurosis, Decapitated, Fear Factory, Cryptopsy, Bolt Thrower, Mastodon, Godflesh, Dark Tranquility, Killing Joke, Pantera, Voivod, and Strapping Young Lad at full volume, and all at the same time. In other words, Gojira mainly focus on making severe death metal with dreamy progressive metal touches, but in no way do they stop at that. They also combine elements of doom, sludge, thrash, technical death, melodeath, and industrial metal, and it's clear that the band members also have a fair amount of grindcore and hardcore running through their veins. Needless to say, it's quite a lethal brew, and metalheads would be hard pressed to find another band that's more brutal and barbaric than Gojira (who, by the way, are a French quartet that shares a namesake with a Japanese films' star named Godzilla).

And, very much alike the fictitious green dinosaur mentioned above, these twelve tracks are tremendously huge, muscular, and savage, so they ferociously and effortlessly crush and obliterate everything in sight (and even everything within a fifty-mile radius). It seems like every band member engages in a free-for-all battle against one-another. Vocalist Joe Duplantier barks, yells, and howls in such a way as to evoke Jens Kidman (of Meshuggah), but it's not uncommon for his vocals to border on the classic gore-grind style. Meanwhile, guitarist Christian Andreu pounds out one pile of monstrous, groove-based riffs after another with an impossible ease, while drummer Mario Duplantier backs him up with tons of deft blasting.
Read more ›
2 Comments 38 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
This is a very unique metal release - it has some clear influences and predecessors, but manages to combine those into a very distinctive package.

Between the cover art and the band's name, you actually get a good idea of what you can expect to hear. It's spacy and trippy at times, but like the namesake movie monster, or the whale of the cover, it's heavy and ponderous as well. The fundamental sound is a slow, grinding, very heavy one that reminds me a midway point between early Godflesh and Meshuggah. I actually prefer these guys over Meshuggah - for whatever reason their ideas just tickle my brain a little more. The singing reminds me of Sepultura, and bits and pieces also bring to mind Soundgarden at their heaviest, or maybe old Seattle sludge bands like Tad. And then there are the grindcore breaks... or the Pink Floydish chiming guitar interludes... no matter. It all works together in an unexpected way, surprising you regularly but never going off the rails.

The lyrics and mood of the album are unusual, tackling environmental issues in a positive way (instead of "we're all gonna die!", it tends toward "maybe we can fix this mess"). The actual words are a bit ham-handed and occasionally dumb in that foreign-metal-guy-singing-in-English way, but most of the time you won't be able to make them out. It certainly doesn't detract from the experience except on the closing track, which is sung more cleanly than any other song here.

Overall I have to say, this is the best tremendously heavy album I've bought in a long time.
2 Comments 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
In my childhood, I was a kid fascinated with science fiction monster movies. Among the greats, Gojira *or as Americans know it, Godzilla* was on the top of my list. He represented everything that I've grown to like about metal which is full out destruction and heaviness. Naturally, when I heard a metal band had used the name Gojira, this band better live up to the name. Thankfully, for most part, this Frenchies live up to their name with an album that delivers just like the mighty beast does.

From Mars to Sirius consists of pretty much everything that people on metalreview have said. It is an album filled with hints of Meshuggah, Strapping Young Lad, and even at times something like Isis. So how could these guys pull off anything that we haven't heard a thousand times before? Luckily, the band knows how to create an identity without wearing their influences on their sleeve. The greatest thing that Gojira has going for itself is the amount of variety, while keeping a unified sound. The album kicks off with a militant smasher in "Ocean Planet", and then follows up with a very straightforward "Backbone". The album then precedes to go to the slow grinding "Where The Dragons Dwell" with Joe Duplianter showcasing a very guttural and downright intimidating vocal presence.

One of the other qualities about the album as well is the lack of guitar solos. I know it is a cardinal sin to say such things, but I didn't find myself bored with the guitar work. I think placing solos on the album would have slowed the album down a bit. If a metal album can survive without guitar solos, I say more power to the band. Sometimes bands force the placement of their solos, and I'm glad this band didn't fall victim to that. Production on From Mars to Sirius is top notch with crystal clear sound.
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category