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Martha doesn't share! Hardcover – September 7, 2010

4.9 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

PreS–After learning how to apologize in Martha Doesn't Say Sorry (Little, Brown, 2009), the stubborn little otter returns to master a new lesson. She overuses “mine,” her new favorite word, until she is left performing magic tricks without an audience, putting on puppet shows with only one puppet, and playing Ping-Pong without a partner. Through the gentle encouragement of her parents, Martha realizes that she can have more fun if she shares. The watercolor and colored-pencil drawings, with few props and no backgrounds, focus on each character's body language and facial expressions. Through her scowl, up-turned snout, and raised eyebrows, Martha's feelings should be readily evident to youngsters. The simple story line offers nothing new, but fans of other girly animal characters like Kevin Henkes's Lilly, Ian Falconer's Olivia, and Russell and Lillian Hobans' Frances will gravitate toward the lavender cover and feminine accent font.Rachel Kamin, North Suburban Synagogue Beth El, Highland Park, IL
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

About the Author

Samantha Berger will happily share her puppets and lava lamp, but she she loves sharing her children's books most of all. She is the author of Martha Doesn't Say Sorry, Martha Doesn't Share, and Crankenstein. She now lives in New York where Samantha and her dog Polly Pocket share a home, love for the Golden Girls, and pancakes every Sunday.

Bruce Whatley has always shared. When he was young, he shared the measles and the mumps with all his friends. He is also happy to share the blame for his messy studio...but nobody wants to share that with him. Bruce shares his life in Australia with his wife, Rosie, and their two grown-up children, Ben and Ellyn.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 6 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 1
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (September 7, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780316073677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316073677
  • ASIN: 0316073679
  • Product Dimensions: 11.5 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #458,048 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Martha Doesn't Share! is a delightful book about an adorable otter named Martha who needs tweaking with her social skills. It seems her most favorite word is "Mine".

When baby brother Edwin asks to play with her toys, she quite emphatically tells him, they are hers and hers alone. Mom and Dad Otter urge Martha to take turns, but Martha stubbornly reminds everyone that the toys belong to her and she goes off to play by herself. While performing magic tricks is fun, it's not as enjoyable without an audience. She realizes the "it's hard to ping when you don't have someone to pong." Martha discovers that her toys by themselves cannot bring her the fun and enjoyment she expects. Martha learns that by sharing, she is guaranteed a playmate and finds an amusing solution to her problem. Loved the ending. It reminded me of a similar outcome when my own baby brother and I learned to share.

Cute illustrations, warm colors and an enjoyable read all the way around.
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Format: Hardcover
Martha has a new favorite word.
And that word is MINE!

She says it about her pancakes.
She says it about her scooter.
She says it about her dollhouse.
She says it about her blanket, too.
MINE.

In the Samantha Berger's first book, Martha learned about how it was important to say she was 'Sorry'. Now with that out of the way Martha is free to figure out this whole 'sharing' thing. You see, Martha has a little brother, Edwin, and she absolutely does not want to share with him. Not her toys, her blanket, the family lava lamp or even a potted plant. No, with her it's mine, mine, MINE!

The family resolves this problem--*spoiler here* -- in a gentle fashion by leaving Martha with all of these things she covets so much. And guess what? As all we big folk know, it's not so fun to be all by yourself with only things. No,, it's a heap more fun to have someone to play with, and playing with someone does mean sharing.

THE SKINNY:::
My hub and I love the gentle approach that Samantha promotes to resolve this problem. There's no shouting or lecturing, Martha just gets exposed to the 'natural' consequences of her actions.

The kids and I love Bruce Whatley's drawings. Martha and her family are so expressive and huggable, and baby Edwin is an adorable toddler with his wee binkie.

This is a pretty book in my favorite shade of lavender. The jacket has the big picture of Martha, but the actual cover has a smaller silhouette of 'our girl' with her nose in the air.

Good Read-aloud. Good story that kids can relate to.

Pam T~
mom/blogger
booksforkids-reviews
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Format: Hardcover
I am a first grade teacher and my students absolutely LOVED 'Martha Doesn't Say Sorry". The relatable text and even more relatable pictures made my students eager to pick up the book themselves. They have been anxiously awaiting the next Martha book and I am thrilled that I will get to read it to them soon. The topics covered in both of these books are obviously common among young students, so I hope that there will be even more books added to the Martha series in the future. I would definitely recommend this book, and the previous book, for any teacher, parent, or reader that enjoys funny and relatable literature to read to young children. 5+ stars!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book had many colorful illustrations and the story was simple to understand for both toddlers age children. My 2 year old found it entertaining; she would laugh when Martha said everything was "mine,mine, mine" because she recognized that behavior. The story shows that no one wants to play with Martha when she doesn't share and it can be boring and lonely. My daughter really understood after reading it that sharing wasn't just about being "nice" to others; she also learned sharing made play more fun and benefited her. We loved this book!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am so thrilled that there is a second Martha book to share with my son! Our first Martha book, Martha Doesn't Say Sorry really helped him to understand the importance of apologizing when we have hurt someone. And now a book on sharing--another HUGE topic in our house right now. I absolutely love the Martha books--they tackle important issues for little ones and help them learn life's lessons in a humorous and compassionate way. Keep 'em coming!!!
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Format: Hardcover
I first found this book at our local library and read to my granddaughter. This book has been so good lately as she now has a younger brother and sharing is a challenge for the two of them. So, every once in awhile I feel the need to re-read this book and how Martha doesn't want to share with her younger brother and finds out it isn't much fun to play alone. I can't say my grandchildren have reached the age that if they didn't play together they would be disappointed but I try hard to get them to get along and share!
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Format: Hardcover
Honestly, when a friend recommended the Martha books because they taught great lessons, I did not have high hopes. I find "lesson books" in general to be preachy and uninspiring. However, "Martha Doesn't Share!" and it's prequel, "Martha Doesn't Say Sorry!" are ABSOLUTELY WONDERFUL! Spoiler alert: Martha does learn to share (and to say sorry) but she does so on her own. When Martha's baby brother wants to play with her scooter, she says no. Martha's parents suggest that she take turns with her baby brother, but Martha doesn't particularly like to take turns, so she scoots away. At this point, no one tells her what to do, forces her to share, or takes away her toys to punish her. Martha decides to share ON HER OWN. Samantha Berger's writing is surprising, funny, and delivers an honest portrayal of familiar childhood trials. Bruce Whatley's illustrations capture little Martha's hoarding, and are a wonderful compliment and addition to the text. Very highly recommend.
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