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Marvel 1985 Paperback – August 5, 2009

4.2 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Paperback, August 5, 2009
$10.88 $3.87

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (August 5, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785121595
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785121596
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.3 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,830,246 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Small Town America, 1985: Toby Goodman is a thirteen year old boy who weathers the storm of his parent's seperation, his mother's choice of new boyfriend and his father's indolence by immersing himself in the minituae of the Marvel comics universe. Fast becoming kind of kid who can tell you in which issue 'The Hulk' first encountered 'The Leader', Toby's humdrum existence takes a turn for the bizarre when he spots a creature that resembles 'Captain America's' arch-nemesis, 'The Red Skull', gazing out from an upper storey window of the local nexus of suburban folklore, the abandoned Wyncham house. Before long, more characters from the pages of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby's fictional universe begin showing up in the flesh. Who or what is responsible? What is the connection with the Wyncham house's notorious past? and what can an isolated teenage boy really do when confronted with the likes of 'Modok', 'The Lizard' and 'Fin Fang Foom'?

Mark Millar and Tommy Lee Edward's "Marvel 1985" was a comic book that I wanted to like a lot because of the intriguing premise - but after reading it, I found myself strangely underwhelmed.

Drawing heavily from the concept of films like The Last Action Hero and playing fast and loose with the concept of fictional versus real violence should have been a lot more effective in the hands of a writer like Mark Millar. Sadly, in the case of this book, it wasn't. I couldn't engage with the characters as anything other than cyphers and cliches and whilst TLE's artwork was suitably lurid and vaguely reminiscent of the artwork of comics like
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The most compelling thing about this book is that it's set in the real world in a specific time frame- and wonders what would happen if the heros and villians we've always admired as readers- were to cross over into our reality. Fascinating idea that deserves further exploration. If you're nostalgic about or interested in the 1980s you might really enjoy the small details in this story.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book tells the story of a young boy who loves comics, especially Marvel comics, someday he findout that all the villians from the Marvel Universe is in this world, our world, and that is totally scary, cause like Mark Millar once said, sandman is regular villian in Spiderman universe, but in our world he can defeat an entire army, or Modok can kill hundreds of people in a minute, just force them to kill themselves. Mark Millar writing is awesome and always has this greats plots twits that leaves you in the edge of your seat, Tommy Lee Edwards' art is not my favorite cause he is not constant, but he traslate the terror in evey pain. This book is must have for Marvel and comics fans.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I felt that the story was well conceived and told, but the art just didn't work for me. Not saying it was bad, but I feel this story would have been represented better if the parts of the story in the "real" world had been almost photorealistic, with the forays into the "Marvel" world had done in a more standard, comic book style. The "Marvel" world was well represented by the style chosen, but the "real" world representation was way too stylistic for my taste.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A horror story staring Marvel's super villains a very good comic to read with great art .
the story of a kid and his dad connecting over something they love there relationship to each other is strong .
The dad's relationship to his exwife is believable by the end of the story even though she love's him when before he dies ,
he came back to there house to save her . If this were a movie they would get back together in Hollywood fashion they don't ,
even though dying is kind of a cheat .
His son becomming a writer for Marvel Comics so he could bring him back to life with a woman he had a crush on as a kid reading comics is great .
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would have been the same age as the main character in the book in 1985, so this was a very nostalgic read for me. Great writing, great art, and a unique spin on the Marvel Universe. If you are a child of the 80's who read comics at the time, you don't want to miss this!
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Format: Paperback
Like Wanted or The Ultimates, Mark Millar's 1985 takes place at the meta-intersection of comic books and reality. However, whereas the previous two take place in the Marvel, comic book universe, 1985 takes place in our own.

Happily, Millar never gives in to the temptation to explain anything. There's a big portally thing (a glowing plothole, essentially) and a bunch of Marvel villains dive through it. Ostensibly there to 'take over', the villains immediately devote themselves to acts of senseless and horrifying destruction.

Our hero is a kid who, alongside his deadbeat dad, realize that there's something very wrong going on (First hint: Ultron blowing up the mall). Thanks to their geeky knowledge of the Marvel universe (plus some courage + purity of heart stuff), they save the day.

1985 probably isn't the best juxtaposition of comics and reality - but there aren't many better. By setting aside his need for 'big sweeping plot arcs' and world-building and focusing on the minutiae of life, Millar has written a solid piece of horror fiction. Not only does he use many of the genre tropes (little kid, estranged family, nobody who believes, creepy house in the woods), but he also successfully channels the fanboy wantonness of Wanted to create some fairly terrifying bad guys.

As Millar says in an interview with Comics Bulletin:

"In the Marvel Universe a guy like Stilt Man is a joke, but here in the real world he would be terrifying. He could take on an entire police precinct. Somebody like Sandman could take on the US Army. We all kind of forget how scary these guys could be in the real world. That's the origin of the series: the real world vs. the Marvel Universe.
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