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Maximum Insecurity:  A Doctor in the Supermax by [Wright M.D., William]
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Maximum Insecurity: A Doctor in the Supermax Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 315 customer reviews

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Length: 257 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

The book is wonderful.
It is hysterically funny, insightful, and very human.  Most of all it provides a transparent, but worldly, glimpse into the practice of medicine in a prison where the patient population consists of especially serious (and often loopy) offenders, where the prison bureaucracy strives mightily to act as dysfunctional as the screwiest of inmates, and where the physicians, assistants and nurses undertake to treat with compassion, but not judge, or burst out loud laughing at the machinations of, an odd and sometimes dangerous lot.
-- The Honorable Richard Kopf, Senior United States District Judge   

There's a doctor in the Big House, and he has some chillingly funny tales about his patients.
In his chilling and hilarious memoir, Maximum Insecurity: A Doctor in the Supermax, now-seasoned supermax prison physician William Wright shares his initiation into hard truths learned on the job. These include how to respond to ridiculous prisoner requests and lawsuits, the paperwork he came to know intimately, the irritable bowels that seem to accompany prison life, and the nth degree of idiocy in most attempts at manipulation of authority by prison denizens. Interesting, well-written, and funny, this book deserves a wide readership.

-- Carrie Wallace, ForeWord Clarion Reviews

 
 


 

About the Author

William Wright, a commercial photographer since 1984, specializes in architectural assignments. Born and raised on Long Island inNew York, Bill moved to Seattle in 1987, where he now lives with his wife, Pauline.

Product Details

  • File Size: 792 KB
  • Print Length: 257 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: William Wright; 1 edition (December 19, 2013)
  • Publication Date: December 19, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00HGZ8II8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,607 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

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Having worked in a maximum security prison in Ohio for 8 years as one of the Mental Health crew This book rang very true to experiences of my own. I suspect the author cleaned up the inmate's language considerably. His concise writing style and wry wit made it a pleasure to read. This is an excellent look at life inside the walls.
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Very few books have the ability to be informative, terrifying, and hilarious, but Maximum Insecurity and the author's all-too-real experiences working in a Supermax prison certainly qualify. This is an excellent read.
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Imagine if dr house wrote a memoir. It would be a series of insulting comments about his patients. Might be funny for a while, but it would get old quickly. Unfortunately this book falls into that trap. Other issue is that there is no real structure to the anecdotes.
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This book is one long slog of...stupidity. Because, according to the author, everyone in it (with the exception of himself and one or two nurses) is stupid. The prisoners most of all, but also the system he's working within. Bureaucracies are noted at different points as Nazis and donut-eating ignoramuses. And he doesn't, we're told, like to take orders in any case. His interactions with the prisoners he treats are all on the same theme--prisoners make up symptoms, want drugs, and ignore the doctor's diagnosis and advice. After a while the unending litanies become as boring and dreary as the monochromatic paint adorning every site he works in. And the author manages to contradict himself. Despite noting to his wife that he doesn't even ask what his patients are in prison for because that's not what is important, with every single inmate interaction he gives us what the inmate was in for. He tells us that the job is easy, with lots of down time, then tells of non-stop inmate interactions. He tells us at the end that inmates are still human and deserve his best care, yet throughout the book, in dealing with inmates, he is off-hand, sarcastic, and gives mental notations that give the opposite message.

I wish the author had given more details about himself and less of the history of the Colorado Penitentiary. And more varied interactions between himself and staff and the prisoners would also have made the book more interesting. Its really too bad, because this is a topic that is very interesting to me and I was hoping for better.
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I wanted to like this book. Really, I did. But so much of the way it's written is bugging me.

I never want to hear the word "excruciating" again. Nor do I want to hear someone complain about their bowels. We get it already.

And for a doctor, the line "but this is America, where you can get rich by pouring coffee in your own lap" is just plain lazy. That's the most painfully oversimplified lawsuit in the country. One mention was cringe-inducing enough, but to have to read it multiple times was downright annoying.

The worst part though was the fact that the whole book carries this "I'm better than you" and "I don't care" kind of tone. You can write about criminals without being smug and insulting every other person in your story. Well, some people can anyway.
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As a retired RN with 18 years of correctional healthcare experience, I was delighted to read this lighthearted take on the practice of medicine in a prison setting. Dr. Wright's impressions are true to life, humorous, and an accurate description of life in a medical department in a maximum security prison.
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Fairly interesting but didn't like the writer - arrogant and judgmental physician. Couldn't understand why he stayed there if he disliked the patients so much. Often seemed to be trying for humor by contempt for his patients.
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Dr. Wright is bored with his ENT practice so he takes a job at a supermax prison. Unfortunately, he arrives at this new job with his lack of enthusiasm intact. This book is more a bit*ch session about prison bureaucracy (and beige walls) than a memoir. Dr. Wright seems typical of an older generation of doctors who expect everyone to kowtow to them. If you want power over people, what better place than a prison? Okay, that’s unnecessarily harsh, but he seems to see all the prisoners as psychopathic drug seekers with constipation. I get that you have to do some nasty deeds to earn your way into a supermax, but a little compassion would go a long way. (Yeah, I’m a bleeding-heart liberal.)
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