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Rivals for Catan

4.4 out of 5 stars 222 customer reviews
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  • Updated version of the classic Settlers of Catan card game
  • For 2 players
  • Tons of replay value
23 new from $32.63 2 collectible from $39.99

WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Product Description

Product Description

Build your domain to best your Rivals. The Rivals for Catan puts you in charge of one of the two factions developing newly-settled Catan. Use your under card mix to create your own principality. Explore and settle new lands, acquiring resources through card play and the luck of the dice. Use gold, response combinations, and trade to develop your domaine. Expand your settlements and cities recruit heroes, and defend your lands through politics, invention, and intrigue. Your cunning and a dash of luck decides who will be Prince of Catan. The Rivals for Catan contains:. 180 Cards. Production Die. Event Die. Commerce Token. Knight Token. Rules and Card Index.

From the Manufacturer

Build your domain to best your Rivals. The Rivals for Catan puts you in charge of one of the two factions developing newly-settled Catan. Use your under card mix to create your own principality. Explore and settle new lands, acquiring resources through card play and the luck of the dice. Use gold, response combinations, and trade to develop your domaine. Expand your settlements and cities recruit heroes, and defend your lands through politics, invention, and intrigue. Your cunning and a dash of luck decides who will be Prince of Catan. The Rivals for Catan contains:. 180 Cards. Production Die. Event Die. Commerce Token. Knight Token. Rules and Card Index.

Product Information

Product Dimensions 1.8 x 8.4 x 6.2 inches
Item Weight 12.8 ounces
Shipping Weight 13.6 ounces
Domestic Shipping This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
International Shipping This item is not eligible for international shipping. Learn More
ASIN B00486TI3M
Item model number MFG3131
Manufacturer recommended age 10 - 14 years
Best Sellers Rank #11,267 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
#500 in Toys & Games > Games > Board Games
Customer Reviews
4.4 out of 5 stars 222 customer reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Matthew R. Castro on December 5, 2010
Verified Purchase
The game plays like a mix between Settler of Catan: Cities and Knights and any combo-card playing game. In order to be victorious you will have to manage your resources/trades efficiently but more importantly you will have to get to know the deck. This aspect of the card game differentiates it significantly from the board game, which requires very little memorization of cards going into the game. In Rivals, knowing whats out there and how cards build upon each other to help your principality or hurt your opponent's is key to success.

And there is some depth in here. After only a few games, its been interesting to see how different strategies may lead to victory. In the 'Era of Progress' Game we played, I built expansions that made it cheaper to look at the draw stacks for cards and cheaper to build (other expansions). I also built an accelerated production/trade system with grain to fill the gap in resources I didn't roll. My wife, on the other hand, had the skill point advantage almost the whole game, giving her a free resource whenever Celebration was rolled. She also had an extra Progress Point, allowing one more card in her hand and she had a building that gave her a resource when the Plague event occurred (it does quite often in the Era of Progress). So I focused on trying to make resource production efficient and she focused on getting extra resources and cards. She won! It was 12-11 nail biter.

The "I hate this [...] game" dice factor of SoC is mostly gone as well. The dice can be a bit unfair at times but the fact that you get to produce something on each turn limits the pain a bit. There are also expansions that somewhat counter-act uneven dice rolls.
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We received this as a gift while we were waiting for our kids to be old enough for Settlers. We've had it for about a year now and we've easily played at least 3-5 times a week in that year. So it suffices to say that we like Rivals.

Is the gameplay really that spectacular? I don't know, but it is terribly addictive. It is kind of an anomaly that we play this game almost every night and have yet to get tired of it. I think it might be because of the head-to-head nature, because it always leaves one of us thirsting for a re-match. Or maybe because every time you play you're dealt a different hand and have to use a different strategy. There's an essentially unlimited amount of replay value.

We also love that it's so easy to set up. We try for a nightly game of something together after our kids go to bed but we're usually pretty tired. Setting up something like Dominion (much as we love it) just isn't very appealing. I should note that after learning all the rules for Rivals and separating all the crescent cards and dealing the six back in (if it even is six - can't remember), we eventually just quit and now we just shuffle the cards, deal them out, and play with them all at once, so now it's REALLY easy to set up.

The durability seems pretty good. It's mostly been adults handling the cards, but our toddler has definitely gotten in on it from time to time. There are scratches that show when the light hits the cards, but they're not scuffed or peeling or anything. They're still just cards, but not flimsy at all, in my opinion.

If I had one complaint to make about Rivals (aside from the weirdness of seeing Gwyneth Paltrow), it's just the stupid box. It would've been so easy to just make a box with two (or four) identical spaces to hold the cards. No, you get this weird rectangle that really doesn't contain them well at all. It's silly, but it kind of irritates me every time I put it away.
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Well, let me first say my friends and I are Catan addicts! We aren't the standard "Settlers of Catan" board game players. We play with "Seafarers of Catan", "Cities and Knights of Catan", and "Traders and Barbarians of Catan" all together. (Yes the official rules exist for that.) We play every Sunday. I say all that in a way that kind of gives you my credentials. We know Catan inside and out. When I heard the card game was getting rebooted, I thought it seemed intriguing. The more blog posts that came out from the creator (Klaus Teuber), the more I wanted it. The card game is based on a book about the early days of Catan. I have not read the book myself, but I understand that is where many of the hero cards come from.

The game is complex, more so than opening the base board game and playing. But thankfully, the creators made an introductory game where you play to 7 points and get used to the game. Play that a few times before getting into the theme sets. We then played each theme set in the order suggested: Era of Gold, Era of Turmoil, and Era of Progress. Each theme adds elements to the game that causes you to change your strategy. The most vicious one is definitely Era of Turmoil. If you don't get the strength advantage, you can spend your whole time rebuilding what you lost. Eras of Gold and Progress have cards that are more about building yourself up, but there are some devastating events in those themes, too. You better have a really good relationship with the person you are playing against! Ha ha. We did not preview the cards in each theme, preferring to be surprised as they were drawn. We finally played "Duel of the Princes" with all theme sets. To be honest, it was chaotic and we've only played it once.
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