Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Medieval Cities: Their Origins and the Revival of Trade

4.5 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 858-0000740028
ISBN-10: 0691007608
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$4.20 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$26.95 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
17 New from $10.73 77 Used from $0.01 3 Collectible from $10.88

There is a newer edition of this item:

Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Buxfer: Online money management software
Spend wiser. Live beter. Make better spending decisions with Buxfer. Try it FREE
$26.95 FREE Shipping. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Medieval Cities: Their Origins and the Revival of Trade
  • +
  • Economic and Social History of Medieval Europe
  • +
  • Mohammed and Charlemagne
Total price: $50.73
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"An indispensable complement to the confusing history of the Carolingian period and early days of European civic development. . . . In short, it is one of the best sort of contributions to historical writing--those which combine simplicity with erudition and imagination with accuracy."--New Statesman (London)

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (April 1, 1969)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691007608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691007601
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #104,346 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Greg Nyquist VINE VOICE on August 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is a groundbreaking work in the study of the so-called "Dark Ages." Pirenne, one of the great scholars and historians of the 20th century, discovered that the economic destitution of Western Europe during the 8th, 9th, and 10th centuries was a consequence, not of the barbarian invasions, as is commonly supposed, but of the Islamic presence in the Mediterranean. The astonishing advance of Islam into Northern Africa, Spain, and Syria during the 7th and 8th centuries meant that Western Europe lost control of the Mediterranean. It became, as Pirenne puts it, a "Moslem lake," and because of this, Western Europe found itself in what amounted to a state of virtual blockade. All the trading routes to the East were cut off and Gaul and other Western European countries were thrown back on their own resources. Bereft of the economic lifeblood of trade, cities shrunk into insignifance. Marseilles, once a thriving seaport, became a ghost town. The Middle Class ceased to exist. Complete autarky reigned in the West. The economic devestation was so bad that Charlemagne's government could not collect any taxes. All of Charlemagne's revenues came from his own estates.
In "Medieval Cities," Pirenne not only sketches the economic disintegration of Western Europe, he also details the revival of trade and the emergence of a flourishing medieval civilization in the 10th, 11th, and 12th centuries. How did Western Europe pull itself out of the dark ages? Pirenne's brief answer is simple: by reclaiming control of the Mediterranean and thereby opening up sea routes to the East.
Read more ›
3 Comments 59 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
In this classic book written in the 1920s, Belgian medieval historian Henri Pirenne tracks the revival of European cities in the Middle Ages. The first chapters lay out what would later be known as the Pirenne thesis: that the classical civilizations of the west were not destroyed by the Germanic invasions of the 5th century, but by the closing of Mediterranean trade in the 7th century, after the Arab conquest of North Africa and the Levant. To defend his thesis, Pirenne shows how significant trade existed in the Mediterranean in the 5th and 6th century. Here I wonder whether it is not possible to adhere to an intermediate position, in the sense that the classical world received two blows (one from the germanic invaders, another from the arab expansion), from which it would not recover. In any case, there is little doubt that urban civilization had virtually disappeared in Western Europe by the 8th century. The Carolingian renaissance of the 9th century was a very modest affair, and Europe would descend back into rural autarchy in the 9th and 10th century with the Viking invasions. It was only after the millenium, that Western European civilization started on its way to recovery, which Pirenne documents in the later chapters dealing with the revival of trade and urban civilization. By the mid 1300s, not even the terrible black death could hold urban civilization in Europe back. All in all, one of the greatest books about medieval economic life.
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Cities have been around for a long time. And even after the fall of the Roman Empire the Mediterranean allowed commerce and the economic system that held them together to continue, still using the Roman model. When Islam took over the Mediterranean many of those European cities found their businesses cut off, out of the loop of trade, and forced to live on the local material and produce of the farmers. Profit was no longer a issue. You made what you needed, no more, no less.
When the crusades and Italian city-states started to take the sea lanes back these cities now had access to trade from the East and went back to using gold coins again. Many turned back to the old methods that had survived, mostly the Roman institutions, but during the time of decline new ways had been invented. The European cities had a middle class and rich merchants, besides the nobles and serfs. Now the cities were to become a mixture of new and old, Roman laws mixed with guilds and population growth. Cities were no longer just military posts and government centers. They became places to live in, work in, invest in and worship in.
The book is a must for any lover of history, World history or European history. It is simple, moves swiftly and even has some humor.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"The air of the city makes free," is an old German proverb, and would have made an apt title for this informative and lively little book (234 pages). Henri Pirenne may have been a ground-breaking historian, but he is a joy to read. He understands that history is important only as it is relevant to today -- to us, the inheritors of this world.

The cities of the ancient world had very little in common with the cities of today. The cities of ancient Greece and Rome were not places of commerce but places of government. The heart of the ancient city was the public square--the forum--where wealthy landowners discussed politics and farming. The ruling elite were administrative, military, and religious officials. The merchants and craftsmen who supplied their needs were mostly non-citizens and slaves. In contrast, the heart of the medieval city was the marketplace. Democratic Greece and the glory that was Rome were based on slavery; the medieval city was based on commerce.

Pirenne traces the history of the city and how it evolved from a city of government to what it became in the thirteenth century and still is to today, a city of commerce. The rise of trade brought about the drastic change--an economic revolution. Pirenne cites Venice as an example. Forced to live on the barren islets of a lagoon off the coast of northern Italy, Venetians had to tax their ingenuity to survive. Trade was thus forced upon them by the very conditions under which they lived. Trade was the making of Venice, as it would be for countless cities across Europe. What began as little more than a meeting place where traders exchanged goods, grew to become cities, not dependent upon kings or the church for their welfare, but upon business.
Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews