Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.30 (9%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Meltdown: The End of the ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This is a pre owned item- in good condition - - shows normal signs of use. When fulfill by Amazon this item is **** Eligible for FREE Super Saver or Amazon Prime Shipping ** All orders backed by Amazon's excellent customer service!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed Paperback – November 8, 2010

4.9 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.65
$6.80 $2.00

Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
$13.65 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed
  • +
  • Capitalist Globalization: Consequences, Resistance, and Alternatives
Total price: $33.65
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Mason (Live Working or Die Fighting), the economics editor of BBC Newsnight, relies on accessible and pithy language to lay out the time line of the meltdown of the U.S. economy in September 2008 and its global reverberations. He details the root causes, names names with impunity and place the blame squarely on the shoulders of policymakers. He argues that when the law governing debt to capital ratios was quietly changed in 2004, this gave banks carte blanche to do whatever they needed to do to make money. Mason writes, Had the old capital restrictions been in place, it is unlikely that any of the Wall Street banks could have built up toxic debts on the scale that eventually sank them. With a quick history (and refutation) of neoliberal ideology, he makes his case that we are seeing the closing of an era; the future heralds the end of the old world banking system business model in favor of low-profit, utility-style banking. This is an instructive and succinct play-by-play of the global crisis, helpful for anyone in finance, economics or even policy. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“A page-turning account ... Mason is refreshingly clear-eyed—and angry.”—Will Hutton, The Guardian

“Excellent.”—Evening Standard

“What people need is a reliable guide to the financial crisis ... Meltdown is the book they are looking for.”—John Gray, The New Statesman

“A lucid and sharply polemical account.”—Oliver Kamm, The Times [London]
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Verso; New Updated Edition edition (November 8, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1844676536
  • ISBN-13: 978-1844676538
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.9 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #451,715 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
88%
4 star
12%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 8 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

By Richard Knox on May 24, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Since the fall of 2008 I've bought and read 35 books on economic related subjects - most from Amazon here - and been scanning 17 blogs by experts such as Krugman and Simon Johnson in my attempt to understand what is really happening - how the current financial crisis evolved and where it is going.

This book gives Mason's (economics editor for BBC's newsnight) perspective in a comprehensive logical detailed way - backed up by 230 footnotes; and gives a logical explanation of where we are probably headed.

He explains how world forces are breaking the dominance of the US oligarchs and will probably force the US into having a responsible financial sector. He describes a future evolving as a struggle between the workers of China - versus the power structure of China - versus the class interests of the West.

It is by far the best explanation I've seen.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Mason's brief work (170 pps.) presents an incisive digest of a global meltdown that came with the kind of suddenness that left many of us asking, "What happened?". The first few chapters provide a week-to-week account of the meltdown itself, a helpful timeline of how the crisis unfolded. The next section looks at the more remote background events and assumptions behind the crisis, chiefly deregulation and neo-liberal policy. The last part may be the most challenging by examining the structure of neo-liberalism itself, mainly from the critical standpoints of Kondratieff and Minsky. The general conclusion is that neo-liberal policy is dead for the foreseeable future, and a more "socialized" banking system recommends itself as the best and perhaps only solution.

He writes in mid-February, 2009, and as of this moment in August, the Obama administration shows no sign of a major bank overhaul, let alone a successor model to neo-liberalism. By Mason's lights, this means a prolonged slump with a very murky future. Be that as it may, the book is a succinct and timely account for the layperson, and I particularly appreciate the inclusion of a glossary of terms. I sometimes think these high-level train wrecks occur because the general public is excluded by the arcane terminology of finance itself. Worse, it's the same public who then pay the price by having to survive amid the debris.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The title is of course wrong - There will never be an end to greed, and the idea that this represents the end of an age is now highly dubious. Still, the combination of on-the-spot journalism and great intellectual command makes this slim book a marvelous read and achievement. Paul Mason is a fine writer, and strong thinker, and since this was one of the most incredible economic happenings of all time, we need his voice to make sense of what is going on around our ears.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Paul Mason is the economics editor of the BBC's flagship Newsnight programme. He explicitly says that this is a journalist's account of the current, and still ongoing, world financial crisis, and that makes for readability and impact. It is also the work of a competent and thoughtful economist, and that gives this book intellectual respectability. It is only near the end that Mason says in so many words that any 'pure' economic analysis or modelling is hopelessly deficient, and that economics without a political dimension is an illusion, but you will have gathered that without much difficulty long before. However the theme is primarily economics and not politics, and Mason's decided opinion that free-market economics is a busted flush is argued from the economic standpoint first. This conclusion will come into conflict with the political value-sets of many, particularly in America, but Mason proceeds - properly - via the track of arguments first and conclusions after. I could not say as much for the doctrine of Senator Phil Gramm, who may be quoting a voice that he has heard from heaven when he intones `...we have learned that government is not the answer. We have learned that freedom and competition are the answers.'

Trainwrecks can be exciting if well described, and the global economic supercrash is chronicled vividly but with sobriety and without preaching or sensationalism. As in his TV appearances, Mason's plain-man style goes along with a formidable communicative talent. The complexities of the economic reasoning, and in particular the opaque terminology, are set out here as clearly as you are likely to find anywhere.
Read more ›
4 Comments 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Meltdown: The End of the Age of Greed