Kindle Price: $9.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

A Memory of Light (Wheel of Time Other Book 14) by [Jordan, Robert, Sanderson, Brandon]
Audible Narration
Playing...
Loading...
Paused
Kindle App Ad

A Memory of Light (Wheel of Time Other Book 14) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 4,008 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$9.99

Length: 1025 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $12.99 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready
Matchbook Price: $2.99 What's this?
For thousands of qualifying books, your past, present, and future print-edition purchases now lets you buy the Kindle edition for $2.99 or less. (Textbooks available for $9.99 or less.)
  • Thousands of books are eligible, including current and former best sellers.
  • Look for the Kindle MatchBook icon on print and Kindle book detail pages of qualifying books. You can also see more Kindle MatchBook titles here or look up all of your Kindle MatchBook titles here.
  • Read the Kindle edition on any Kindle device or with a free Kindle Reading App.
  • Print edition must be purchased new and sold by Amazon.com.
  • Gifting of the Kindle edition at the Kindle MatchBook price is not available.
Learn more about Kindle MatchBook.

Kindle Daily Deals
Kindle Delivers: Daily Deals
Subscribe to find out about each day's Kindle Daily Deals for adults and young readers. Learn more (U.S. customers only)
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

“The battle scenes have the breathless urgency of firsthand experience, and the . . . evil laced into the forces of good, the dangers latent in any promised salvation, the sense of the unavoidable onslaught of unpredictable events bear the marks of American national experience during the last three decades, just as the experience of the First World War and its aftermath gave its imprint to J. R. R. Tolkien's work.” ―The New York Times on The Wheel of Time®

About the Author

Robert Jordan was born in 1948 in Charleston, South Carolina. He taught himself to read when he was four with the incidental aid of a twelve-years-older brother, and was tackling Mark Twain and Jules Verne by five. He is a graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a degree in physics. He served two tours in Vietnam with the U.S. Army; among his decorations are the Distinguished Flying Cross with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and bronze oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm. A history buff, he has also written dance and theater criticism and enjoyed the outdoor sports of hunting, fishing, and sailing, and the indoor sports of poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting. Robert Jordan began writing in 1977 and went on to write The Wheel of Time(r), one of the most important and best selling series in the history of fantasy publishing with over 14 million copies sold in North America, and countless more sold abroad. Robert Jordan died on September 16, 2007, after a courageous battle with the rare blood disease amyloidosis.

Brandon Sanderson is the bestselling author of books including "Warbreaker", "Elantris", The Stormlight Archive series, starting with "The Way of Kings", and The Mistborn series-"Mistborn", "The Well of Ascension, The Hero of Ages "and "The Alloy of Law". He has also written "Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians", a book for middle-grade readers, and the young adult novel, "The Rithmatist. "He also completed the final books in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time(r) series-"The Gathering Storm", "Towers of Midnight" and "A Memory of Light"-based on Jordan's notes and material. Sanderson teaches writing at Brigham Young University. He lives in Utah.

Kate Reading is the recipient of multiple "AudioFile" Earphones Awards and has been named by "AudioFile" magazine as a Voice of the Century, as well as the Best Voice in Science Fiction & Fantasy in 2008 and 2009 and Best Voice in Biography & Culture in 2010. She has narrated works by authors as Jane Austen, Robert Jordan, Edith Wharton, and Sophie Kinsella. Reading has performed at numerous theaters in Washington D.C. and received a Helen Hayes Award for her performance in Aunt Dan and Lemon. "AudioFile" Magainze reports that, "With subtle control of characters and sense of pacing, Kate s performances are a consistent pleasure.."

Product Details

  • File Size: 4387 KB
  • Print Length: 1025 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (April 9, 2013)
  • Publication Date: April 9, 2013
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00BMKDTNC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,179 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kriti Godey on January 8, 2013
Format: Hardcover
NOTE: I tried to make this review as spoiler-free as possible but still enjoyable for people that have read the book. You might not want to read it if you want to go into the book with an absolutely blank slate, but none of the book's surprises are spoiled if you do read it.

--------------

I know there are no endings to the Wheel of Time and this is merely AN ending, but I still can't believe the Wheel of Time is over.

This book is a perfect ending. The main theme of the Wheel of Time has always been balance between two opposing forces - saidin and saidar, Darkness and Light, good and evil. The resolution of the story carries that philosophy to its logical place - there's no other way it could've ended.

Don't go into this book expecting all your questions to be answered - some are, but a lot aren't. It feels right, though - there are far bigger things going on.

Most of this book involves battles. Tarmon Gai'don is the Last Battle, and the stakes are truly desperate. The book does a great job of conveying the scale of this conflict, even though it's exhausting to read about. Any less, and it would've been too easy to win. The usual "no one dies" approach that the rest of the books have does not apply. Some very bad things happen to very good people, and death seems better than some of them. Our heroes are outnumbered and outmaneuvered, and it shows. Even at the end, you're not left feeling like it's been a great victory - you're horrified. There's still hope, though, and that's what matters.

Of course, it's not all bleak - there are several moments where characters are really awesome, including some unexpected ones (Gaul, you are the man).
Read more ›
31 Comments 579 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The Wheel of Time is finished. That's a statement that's going to take a while to get used to. The first volume of the series, The Eye of the World, was published in January 1990. George Bush Snr. and Margaret Thatcher were still in power and the Cold War was still ongoing. Fourteen books, four million words, eleven thousand pages and over fifty million sales (in North America alone) later, the conclusion has finally arrived. Can it possibly live up to the expectations built up over that time?

It is a tribute to the plotting powers of Robert Jordan, the writing skill of Brandon Sanderson (who took over the series after Jordan's untimely death in 2007) and the hard work of Jordan's editors and assistants that A Memory of Light is - for the most part - a triumphant finale. Given the weight of expectations resting on the novel, not to mention the unfortunate circumstances under it was written, it is unsurprising that it is not perfect. The novel occasionally misfires, is sometimes abrupt in how it resolves long-running plot strands and sometimes feels inconsistent with what has come before. However, it also brings this juggernaut of an epic fantasy narrative to an ending that makes sense, is suitably massive in scope and resolves the series' thematic, plot and character arcs satisfactorily - for the most part.

It is a familiar viewpoint that The Wheel of Time is a slow-burning series, with Robert Jordan not afraid to have his characters sitting around talking about things for entire chapters (or, in one case, an entire novel) rather than getting on with business.
Read more ›
14 Comments 292 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm in the strange position of being both a fan of the Wheel of Time while also sympathizing with the complaints of detractors. While remaining, book after book, emotionally invested in the core group of characters and appreciating Jordan's acute storytelling, some things have to be acknowledged. It was too long. There were too many characters and storylines, and too many scenes inched along to the point of rendering the reader comatose.

In hindsight, then, it shouldn't have been surprising that the chickens came home to roost in "A Memory of Light." Key characters that we've gotten to know and love were killed off with hardly a backward glance, whereas the reunions of those who did survive were emotionally flat. Steven Erickson's mammoth "Malazan" series suffered a similar problem. When you build a big, bloated machine like this, the individual components inevitably get sold short in the end.

Throughout the series, I often wondered about the contradiction between the "endless turning of the Wheel of Time" and "The Last Battle." That contradiction is not resolved in a coherent or satisfying manner. I also didn't care for the bargain-basement philosophizing between Rand and the Dark One. Most elementary-school graduates understand that good loses all meaning in the absence of evil, while life loses all interest in the absence of conflict. Surely the Dragon Reborn, with everything he's experienced and endured, and a supernatural being who has existed since the dawn of Creation can do better than this.

I don't blame Brandon Sanderson. I think, in many ways, he was given an impossible task.
Read more ›
1 Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

A Memory of Light (Wheel of Time Other Book 14)
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: A Memory of Light (Wheel of Time Other Book 14)