Kindle Price: $0.00

Save $18.85 (100%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

The Mill on the Floss by [Eliot, George]
Kindle App Ad

The Mill on the Floss Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 83 customer reviews

See all 15 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$0.00

Length: 348 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled Audible Narration:
Audible Narration
Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $2.99 when you buy the Kindle book.
Ready

click to open popover

Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.


Product Details

  • File Size: 1358 KB
  • Print Length: 348 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 17, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0084AMITE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,984 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a very good customer of Amazon's. At any one time, I can buy tons of books. To paraphrase an old saying, my eyes are bigger than my time in which to read. Therefore, I have developed a strict buying pattern: All purchases must contain one contemporary book on any subject, one book from a list of some sort and one book considered literature. For unexplained reasons, I expected "The Mill on the Floss" to be well written but ponderous. This erroneous expectation was reinforced by the size of the book, 600 pages. Since I had bought it, I decided to soldier on despite the fact that it would undoubtedly be dull.

Was I surprised. Not only was the book a quick-read, it was fun, exciting and thoroughly different from many other Victorian love stories I have read. Maggie, our heroine, was as plucky, smart and beautiful as one would expect. However, be that as it may, Elliot surrounds her with multi-leveled characters. Even those who are merely extras meant to move the plot or explain society's attitudes have depth. While they are meant as background, still they think and act surprisingly. One could describe them as 3D wallpaper.

I was unable to predict the paths the plot would take. While I love Jane Austen and the Bronte sisters, in their books a reader knows who will come to a bad end, who will take the high road, and which characters will end up as a couple at the end of the book. Not so in this novel. Moreover, Elliot's ideas are shockingly modern. Perhaps I should not have used that adjective because not only were the author's books considered shocking in her day, Elliot, herself, shocked the society in which she lived. In addition to the fact that she took a man's name so that her books would sell, she lived for years with a married man.
Read more ›
1 Comment 32 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can remember reading this the year before 'o' levels at school and I was obviously too young then to appreciate what a good piece of literature this is. Essentially a love story, it gives a fab insight into rural 'society' of the times and explores the differences in personalities between a straight-laced brother and his more intelligent, free spirited sister, both operating under the constraints of a moralistic society. It's a book well worth reading
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book was beautifully written with many twists to the tale. The pace of the action, the language and atmosphere in the story reflect the era it was written and so richly portrays. George Eliot reveals herself to be a wonderful observer, with a dry wit and a 'reactionary' to the roles society enforced upon women. Her keen eye gives life to simple details such as flour covered spiders or the volumous attire of the ladies of a certain standing in society.
This book, although written so long ago has the ability to keep us 'on our toes' and, at times, reflects prejudices that still hold true today. The sadness,tragedy and humour all combine to make a great read and I would highly recommend this book.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Our library fiction book group read this classic novel, and most of us enjoyed it. Some preferred it to MIDDLEMARCH, which we also read written by the same author. I preferred MIDDLEMARCH, and attempted to discern the reasons why. In the beginning of this novel, many chapters are spent on young Maggie, the protagonist, and her brother Tom when they were children. As a writing instructor told me, if you make your protagonist a child, you are limiting a lot of the thought to a child's mind and perception. This childhood perspective may not be as interesting to adult readers as an adult's perspective.

It seems the author, George Eliot, was processing memories of her childhood and her own troubled relationship with her own brother Isaac. Some of the experiences which Maggie and Tom experienced in this book Eliot actually experienced as a child. It is known as the most autobiographical of her books. Her brother later disowned her when she lived with a married man who couldn't divorce his wife. Her brother only contacted her eight months before her death. This was after the first man that she loved and lived with had died. And it was after she had married a different man. Her love was now 'legitimate' and sanctioned by society.

In this story, Maggie grows up denying her heart. She can't marry the man she loves. It seems that Eliot, who didn't deny her heart, and lived with the man she loved, was showing Victorian society what happens when a young woman lives according to society's conventions. (Interestingly George Eliot was born the same year as Queen Victoria in 1819.) As one character said, denying your heart is like a self-suicide. I think Eliot was trying to show when we deny what's right for us, for others' sake, we commit a kind of suicide.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is supposed to be Eliot's masterpiece after "Middlemarch" (my favorite of her novels) and the closest to a biography: she is the brilliant, under-appreciated, lively Maggie. The story centers around a rural English family at a mill and Maggie, a young, vivacious, intelligent young girl who is overlooked in favor of her duller, and somewhat brutal older brother whom she idolizes. Later, she becomes overly religious after reading Thomas a Kempis' "Imitiation of Christ" (a theme repeated by Dorothea in "Middlemarch") but falls for a young man in a way that results in a disaster for her. All the people around Maggie Tulliver oscillate between brutishly dull and superficial. The drawing of the provincial characters and landscape is as usual, for Eliot, detailed and sometimes with a tongue lightly pressed to her cheek--the same humorous smile we give to any silly but loved family member, for Eliot loved provincial England though her personality and beliefs were far from fitting in.

The way to get through this book, for me, was with the Audible edition, which is admirably produced. Hearing the words and lingering over the sentences rather than skimming the seemingly-dull passages gives you a feel for Eliot's writing and makes you slow down and take time to feel the humor, the sadness, the frustration and the love she puts into this novel. It's still not my favorite, but I have come to admire it.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews