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Millicent Min, Girl Genius Paperback – June 1, 2006

4.6 out of 5 stars 51 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-8--Millie, an 11-year-old with a genius IQ, is taking a college poetry class and waiting for her high school senior year. Because she never hesitates to show how much she knows about a particular subject, her peers tend to stay away. Millie's social ineptitude is a cause of concern for her parents. Against her will, she is enrolled in summer volleyball and enlisted to tutor Stanford Wong, a friend of the family. Into this mix enters Emily, a volleyball teammate and typical preteen. The girls become friends but Millie neglects to tell Emily about her genius status. Eventually the truth surfaces and Emily feels betrayed. Millie thinks that Emily is angry because she is smart, never realizing that the betrayal comes from her lack of trust in their friendship. While some readers will have trouble identifying with Millie, her trials and tribulations result in a story that is both funny and heartwarming. A universal truth conveyed is that honesty and acceptance of oneself and of others requires a maturity measured not by IQ but by generosity of spirit.--Sharon Morrison, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Durant, OK
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Gr. 4-6. Certified genius Millicent Min has problems. Sure, her parents have finally consented to let her take a college poetry class over the summer (even though Millie is not yet 12). But it turns out college kids aren't her peers--they're as dumb and lazy as her nemesis, Stanford. If Millie can just keep her brilliance a secret from Emily, Millie's first real friend, and manage to keep Emily and Stanford from smooching (ick!), things might turn out OK. Yee's first novel examines child prodigies from a refreshing angle, allowing nongeniuses to laugh appreciatively at the ups and downs of being a whiz kid. Millie's pretentious voice grows tiresome after a while, but Yee does an excellent job of showing both Millie's grown-up brain and her decidedly middle-school problems. Even if they can't relate to her mastery of Latin, most kids will readily follow as Millie struggles through a world where she's smarter than everyone but still sometimes clueless. John Green
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Inc. (June 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0439771315
  • ISBN-13: 978-0439771313
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,186,106 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
The debut novel Millicent Min, Girl Genius by Lisa Yee is an absolute riot. Millicent is eleven years old - and recently completed eleventh grade. Over the summer, she plans to take college courses and (unhappily) tutor Stanford, a boy who drives her up a wall. Her mother, thinking she needs more of a social life with kids her own age, enrolls her in a summer volleyball team. There, she meets a girl who recently moved to town and does not know of Millicent's collegiate status. What's a smart girl to do?
This hilarious book teaches young kids and adults like everywhere that it is okay to be smart. Millicent may feel much older than she is, mentally, but chronologically, she is still a kid. By the end of the summer, she is a little more comfortable in her own skin and proud of who she is and what she's accomplished.
Pop culture tidbit: The audio book is read by Keiko Agena, known as Lane on Gilmore Girls.
I highly recommend this book to kids of all ages. (You too, parents and teachers.) Kids reading comedic realistic fiction such as the Ramona Quimby series by Beverly Cleary, the Alice McKinley series by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor or the Judy Moody series by Megan McDonald will certainly adore Millicent Min. I hope that Yee writes more tales, if not of Millicent, then of others. She has a real knack.
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Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed reading this book. It made me laugh; it made me cry. It made me see things through the eyes of a young person again. Millicent, blessed and cursed with being a child genius, needs something that we all take for granted -- a friend. When Millicent thinks she has finally found someone, Emily, who is willing to be her friend she stops at nothing to keep her friendship going. Meanwhile, she's forced into tutoring the one person with whom she doesn't want to be friends, Stanford. To further complicate matters, Emily and Stanford develop a romantic relations of their own that makes for some interesting plot twists and ironic scenes. In the end, Emily finds true friendship, although in the place she least expected to find it. Henrietta Gowin, my favorite character, really has little to do with the story but that name, Henrietta Gowin, rings of sophistication. Her character must have been inspired by an exceptional person.
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Format: Hardcover
Millicent Min has an impressive resume. She started elementary school at age three, has over seven television appearances to her name, and is the subject of more than six articles on the subject of gifted children. Now that she's eleven and a half, she's about to start her senior year of high school. She is, in short, a genius.

In Millicent Min, Girl Genius, Millicent must endure the summer between her junior and senior years of high school as she counts down to the day she will be free from the company of children, and finally be able to spread her wings in college. This summer, her parents have signed her up for volleyball classes and offered her services as a tutor to friend of the family and obnoxiously typical twelve-year-old boy Stanford Wong. On the upside, they've allowed her to register for a poetry class at a local university, and this summer she's made her first friend.

Millicent goes through all the difficulties of being a smart kid, and she experiences them to the extreme. Her alienation, awkwardness, and pride are all emotions with which anyone ever considered "that smart kid" can identify. Her precociousness is charming and alarming; it seems slightly wrong for a girl of almost twelve to prefer spending time with her poetry professor to attending slumber parties. At the same time, for those of us who are the same way, it seems just right.

Like many other children's and young adult books, Millicent Min, Girl Genius shows us how much change can happen over one summer. Millicent starts off knowing it all, needing no one, and socializing almost exclusively with her grandmother. By the end of the book she realizes she has a lot to learn, comes to appreciate her parents more, and starts hanging out with kids her own age. I strongly recommend Millicent Min, Girl Genius to anyone who loves to laugh, has ever felt like they knew better than the rest of the world, or has been told they're too smart for their own good.
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A Kid's Review on September 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Millicent Min is a good, no great book to read! Not only is it fun filled and funny but it's loaded with little pieces of advice that are very true thanks to the wonderful author Lisa Yee. It's about this very smart girl who has no friends because she is always critizing and correcting them but then her mother signs her up (against her will) for the dreaded volleyball team. There she finally makes a friend, Emily, but Emily doesn't know Milli's secret of being a college student at the age of eleven. Will Millicent tell Emily? And if she does will Emily still be friends? Find out by reading the book.
I've heard that her book is so great that they're going to make it in Italian and it's already out on audio tape! What luck for a first time book! Congrads Mrs. Yee
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A Kid's Review on September 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I know a lot of people like Millicent Min. Even though they may seem smart and confident, they are just regular kids inside. At first I thought Millie was stuck up. Then, I really got to like her. What I really liked about this book was how funny it was. It made me laugh out loud.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't usually go around bragging about it, but I know what it's like to be a genius. I learned to read when I was two years old. I never skipped a grade in school, but it was for reasons of emotional maturity, not that I wasn't intellectually and cognitively ready. Growing up, I found it nearly impossible to play with children my age; even as a toddler, there was always some "higher plan" behind my recreational activities, and the other kids either didn't have the patience, couldn't keep up, or simply found it all too complicated and boring. I went to high school against my will - I would have been perfectly capable at the age of thirteen of getting my GED and taking college classes, but my mother wanted me to have normal adolescent social experiences, which for the most part I didn't. The highlight of my high school career was my near-perfect score on the SAT, which I'd never spent so much as a minute studying for, and which I took having had only three hours of sleep the night before, and a handful of stale jelly beans for breakfast.

"Millicent Min, Girl Genius" is the only novel I have ever read that captured the alienation I so often felt in childhood. At the age of eleven, Millicent has many of the same problems I did at her age. She's lonely, but doesn't even realize it. Taking her first college class over the summer, she hopes she'll meet other students who share her academic interests, with whom she can have intelligent conversations, only to discover that most college students are no more passionately intellectual than high school students, and adults, however fond they may become of her, don't really see someone her age as a potential friend.
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