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Ministries of Mercy: The Call of the Jericho Road Paperback – July 1, 1997

4.7 out of 5 stars 46 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Timothy Keller is the founder and senior pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City, and the New York Times bestselling author of The Reason for God and The Prodigal God. He has also mentored young urban church planters and pastors in New York and other cities through Redeemer City to City, which has helped launch over 200 churches in 35 global cities to date.

Sean Runnette, a multiple "AudioFile" Earphones Award winner, has produced several Audie Award winning audiobooks and has also narrated works by John Steinbeck and Richard P. Feynman. Of his performance of "The Courage to be Free", "AudioFile" Magazine wrote "Runnette s tender approach to every sentence and paragraph helps the author s wisdom glow. Along with the understated power of the author s writing, Runnette s performance makes this one of the most arresting and thought-provoking audiobooks available today." He is a member of the American Repertory Theater company and has toured internationally with Mabou Mines, an avant-garde theater company. Sean's television and film appearances include "Two If by Sea", "Copland", "Sex and the City", "Law & Order", "Third Watch." --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 236 pages
  • Publisher: P & R Publishing; 2nd edition (July 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875522173
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875522173
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #454,170 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The first thing I do when I visit a church is look through the bulletin for any community service outreaches. In 99% of the Reformed churches I visit there are none. There may be service to the community (Bible studies, picnics, sports fellowships), but that community is limited to the church and usually excludes the poor and hurting.

Consequently I have often wondered if there is anything about Reformed theology itself that uniquely hinders Christians from showing compassion. Of course there are exceptions. Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Manhattan with over 20 established outreach ministries comes to mind. Moreover there are plenty of liberal churches disengaged from mercy ministries.

But still, why do most Reformed churches have only the mind of Christ but not His heart? Why are you more likely to find a liberal believer than a Reformed one involved in a homeless shelter, convalescent home, or AIDS hospice? Why are Reformed believers the most likely to know the story of the Good Samaritan but the least likely among Christians to be like the Good Samaritan?

In response to these questions, Dr. Tim Keller, pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church (PCA) and a former professor of Westminster Theological Seminary, offers deep insight and much needed remedies for evangelical churches held captive by a homogeneous middle-class club mentality. If there is one book that needs to be read by members of Reformed churches at this time, it is Keller's Ministries of Mercy.

In our cynical postmodern age, Keller repeatedly emphasizes, compassion is the most credible apologetic.
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Format: Paperback
This book sets forth the Biblical principles for mercy ministry and then suggests practical steps to begin and persevere in doing acts of mercy in your family, church and community. The book is premised on the parable of the Good Samaritan, and the author parses the different parts of the parable (and key Old and New Testament passages) to answer such questions as why do Christians do acts of mercy? what is mercy? what is the balance between the ministry of the word and the ministry of deeds? what is the balance between giving and keeping? who deserves our mercy? All his answers are backed by scripture, so that this book neither comes out on the "left" or the "right" in the political spectrum. Ultimately, Keller shows that both views are inadequate, and only the biblical view can present a complete picture of whether, why and how we should help the poor. All Christians have been shown mercy by God and should therefore be motivated to tirelessly do acts of mercy. Recommended reading for all pastors and deacons!
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Format: Paperback
This book is the most balanced and informative book on mercy ministry that I have read. Keller begins by establishing the basis for mercy ministry in the church on clear biblical principles and outlines practical steps to take in developing and maintaining it. From the solid biblical foundation which he lays for dealing with the disadvantaged, Keller avoids the political bias that often accompanies such works.
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Format: Paperback
This book was given to me as a gift by a Sunday school student after visiting Redeemer Presbyterian Church where Dr. Keller serves. The work itself serves to bring out the Biblical views of how we can best serve others through the local churches. How can we know we have been touched by the Spirit of God?: if our lives (both individually and collectively) bear the fruit of that contact, one of which is mercy. This work also has many other excellent little treasures of wisdom within it. If you are a Deacon or a pastor, I would call this a "must" read.
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i come to the book as part of a directed study that ought to result in a Sunday School class on the issues of "the ministries of mercy in the Christian Church".

This book is designed to be the answer to a set of questions about the conservative Church with it's accent on evangelism and how it strikes a balance as it condemns the liberal wing of the Church for it's accent on the social gospel perhaps to the neglect of evangelism and holy living.

This book is in two pieces: Principles and Practice (orthodoxy and orthopraxis), or why Christians ought to be good Samaritans and how to be genuine mercy bearers/witnesses.

Frankly, i am uninterested in practice except as it illumines ideas, so i will give the 2nd 1/2 less than it deserves in this review, that's just me. The author is fully aware that the two:thought and deed can not really be separated into nice watertight compartments, nor should they, for in doing so you loose something important.

It is written to intelligent laypeople who might be in a classroom at their local church working on the issues, or part of a small group interested in doing mercy ministries, the book is suitable and directed towards both needs and goes it's job well. Part information, part motivation, part analysis, part this-is-what-works, it's a good read, from the pen of someone who actually knows and does what he is talking about.

The book begins with the parable of the Good Samaritan from Luke 10, it is the dominant metaphor of the book, this Call of the Jericho Road. Keller reminds us that the parable is the answer to the question: "what must i do to inherit eternal life?
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