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Miss Moore Thought Otherwise: How Anne Carroll Moore Created Libraries for Children Hardcover – March 5, 2013

4.9 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Pinborough introduces young readers to Anne Carroll Moore, the strong-willed woman whose vision of library services for children shaped the standards and practices of the New York Public Library (and the world) for more than a generation. Moore grew up reading and hearing stories in an era when children were not welcomed by public libraries; she later became a librarian (one of the few jobs open to unmarried women) and worked tirelessly to ensure that all children felt welcome at library programs and were able to check out books. The author treads lightly on legends of Moore’s formidable (and often forbidding) personality, playfully asserting that whenever Miss Moore “thought otherwise,” she got her way. Atwell’s cozy, folk-art-style paintings brim with period details and depict a multicultural clientele. Appended with an author’s note and sources, this makes an ideal addition to women’s history units. Pair with Jeanette Winter’s The Librarian of Basra (2005) or Biblioburro (2010) for other stories of notable librarians. Grades 1-4. --Weisman, Kay

Review

"This makes an ideal addition to women's history units."
Booklist

"A must for school and public libraries and those who love them."
Kirkus

"[An] easygoing picture-book biography."
Horn Book

"A concise, breezy chronology. Atwell's folk-art style acrylics capture a sense of history in the making, as well as the book's themes of excitement and change."
Publishers Weekly

"Atwell's cheery, doll-like figures and joyful colors are a good match for the woman who insisted that children's library space should be vibrant and stimulating."
Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 1 - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 1060L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 40 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (March 5, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 054747105X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547471051
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 8.5 x 10.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #201,706 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Tanenbaum VINE VOICE on March 5, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In her debut book for children, author Jan Pinborough offers a charming picture book biography of Anne Carroll Moore, an individual not well known among the general public but whose advocacy of library services for children are worthy of being celebrated in this handsome new volume released just in time for Women's History Month.

The book begins almost like a fairy tale: "Once in a big house in Limerick, Maine, there lived a little girl named Annie Carroll Moore. She had large gray eyes, seven older brothers, and ideas of her own." We soon learn that Annie is a bit of a rebel, not content to do what a girl was supposed to do in those days. She loved books, but in those days children weren't allowed in the library. When she grew up, she went to New York City on her own to enroll in library school, and soon went to work in a library where they had something brand new--a room just for children, where Annie even read aloud to them. An advocate for children, she later became head of the children's rooms at the New York Public Library's many branches. At this time, children weren't allowed to take books home, since the librarians thought the children wouldn't bring them back.

Pinborough portrays Anne Carroll Moore's feisty personality with a constant refrain in the book: "Miss Moore thought otherwise." When a grand new central library was built in the city of New York, Miss Moore was responsible for creating and designing the special place for children, complete with child-sized furniture. She brought authors, musicians and storytellers to entertain the children, and entertained them herself with her special doll Nicholas Knickerbocker and stories of his life.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Being an elementary school librarian, I have a special appreciation for those who've paved the way for me to share books with children. Anne Carroll Moore was one of those people. I really enjoyed reading about her efforts to help open public libraries to children. She worked hard to create spaces that were child-friendly and full of great books for them to read. I can understand where the libraries were coming from in terms of children returning books damaged or forgetting to return them at all because those things do happen regularly, but on the other hand, of what value is a book just sitting on a shelf?

I found myself cheering Moore on as she helped design the Children's Room in what would become the New York Public Library and as she urged publishers to make more stories available that were especially for children. Reading is such a valuable life-long skill and the sooner it can be instilled in children the better. I've seen that personally on many occasions. Our information rich society is dependent on the ability to read and one's reading ability is dependent on the availability of a variety of interesting informative materials. Thanks be to those like Anne Carroll Moore who saw this early and helped bring it to pass! While there is still much to be done, we have come a long ways from those libraries that refused to even let children inside. Highly recommended.
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Format: Hardcover
My son and I read and reviewed this book for Mother Daughter Book Reviews. Here is my interview with my son about the book and my own bottom line. Visit us for the full review.

SON SAYS:

1. This is a non-fiction book. Did you enjoy it? I enjoyed it because it told the story of someone who used to live and is now dead.

2. What do you think about the cover and the pictures? I like the picture of the big white house at the start of the book because I want to go there. I also liked the picture of the Children's Room in the New York Public Library. It looks comfy and I would like to go there too. The picture of New York City is cool - it's one of my favorites.

3. What did you learn from this book? I learned that girls couldn't do lots of stuff that they can now do and that kids weren't allowed in libraries.

4. How are children treated differently today than the way they were in this book? Now children can go to libraries and then they couldn't. It would be bad to not be able to go to the library because I get books and videos from the library all the time. Girls can do whatever they want and go to school to become lawyers and doctors. I know some girls who are doctors and lawyers like Dr. Lamb and Isabella's Mom.

5. If you had to choose between going to the library and going to a bookstore where would you go and why? I would like to go to the bookstore because you get to keep the books that you buy. It makes me sad to return books to the library when I really like them.

6. What are your favorite books that you've read recently? I really like the Nature Elves series - Dream Robbers, The Witch Sticker Ball, and the Shadow Beast by R.C. Scott.

7. Who do you think would like this book?
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Format: Hardcover
I am in constant awe at the prolific output of picture books featuring biographies of individuals who have made positive contributions to society. My eight-year-old daughter loves reading these picture book biographies because the format is visually attractive, containing color illustrations that enhance the text. The narrative is usually written in a manner that is easy for a child to comprehend.

"Miss Moore Thought Otherwise" is one such example of a quality picture book biography. My daughter saw this at our public library and was eager to read it since she and I are both great fans of our public libraries. The book tells the story of Anne Carroll Moore from her early days as the youngest daughter in a large family in Limerick, Maine to her adulthood where Ms. Moore trained to be a librarian at a time when female librarians were not common. Ms. Moore was aware that libraries at the time were not child-friendly - in many instances, libraries forbade children from entering the premises.

The author goes on to describe Ms. Moore's efforts - from her early days at the Pratt Free Library where Ms. Moore set up special rooms for children to her position as head children's librarian for the 36 branches of the New York Public Library and her pioneering efforts to make libraries places where children could come to read, engage in literacy-themed activities, and many more.

Both my daughter and I were impressed and inspired by this amazing lady who dedicated her life to making libraries havens of reading for children. The end of the book provides further biographical information on Anne Carroll Moore with archival photographs of Ms. Moore as a child and a young woman.
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