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Misty of Chincoteague Hardcover – 1958

4.7 out of 5 stars 301 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 173 pages
  • Publisher: Rand McNally (1958)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FZ4LCI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (301 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,008,407 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I first read "Misty of Chincoteague" when I was a child in the 1950s. I loved the story so much that I ended up memorizing it so that I could tell it to myself after lights-out. My parents took me to Pony Penning Day in the late 1950s, when Chincoteague was still very much like the town Marguerite Henry described and the bridge to Assateague was way, way in the future.

Pony Penning Day was very exciting, but even more exciting was the fact that Misty was still alive and living at the Beebe ranch! I still have a picture of me petting her. Marguerite Henry was there, too -- a wonderful woman, with a genuine love for children. So was Grandpa Beebe, looking very much like Wesley Dennis drew him.

I will always treasure the memory of that vacation, and judging by the other reviews of this book, there are many, many people out there for whom this book occupies a special place in their hearts.

Even though times have changed since this book was written (Maureen would probably not play so much of a second fiddle to Paul these days), the story itself is timeless: the love of the children for the Phantom; their yearning to own her; their willingness to do whatever it took to buy her; Paul's eventual triumph; and, once again, the love of the children for the Phantom that compels them to do what it best for her: these things make up a story that will continue to captivate children for many generations to come.

I would also like to add that the Wesley Dennis illustrations in all of Marguerite Henry's books are simply wonderful. That was a very serendipituous partnership, because his drawings add so much to Mrs. Henry's spledid stories.
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Format: Paperback
My seven year old daughter and I finished this book last night. She was very sad to have it end. What a wonderful account of the devastating storm that hit the islands of Assateague and Chincoteague and the relief efforts to rebuild the islands and the devastated wild pony population.
It was very heartwarming to read in the epilogue excerpts from actual letters of children that sent in their hard earned money to buy back the ponies sold at previous Pony Penning Days to replenish the wild herds of Assateugue. These children and others like them preserved a tradition that had been maintained for over 100 years and because of them continues on today. In fact, Marguerite Henry dedicated this book to those very children that made it all possible.
Marguerite Henry does an excellent job of using local dialect in the telling of the story, especially with Grandpa and Grandma. You can not help but become involved in the characters and their concerns become very real to you.
I read this book many many years ago and had forgotten a great deal of the story. One of the things I did remember was Misty being put in Grandma's kitchen to wait out the storm.
If you are like me and read this book many years ago I encourage to reread it. You will be glad you did.
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By A Customer on May 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I really like the book Misty because I really like horses and colts. I think the book was good also because Marguerite Henry was a good author. The climax is: Will Paul and Maureen ever get to get the Phantom to her colt at Penning Day? My first opinion is I think Misty is the best for kids to read. My second opinion is: People that love horses should read the book Misty. My last opinion is: Misty was the best book I have ever read. Jamie
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Format: Paperback
This book is as exciting and touching today as it was when it was first published, in 1947. First of all, there`s the startling discovery that Western mustangs are not America`s only "wild" horses- the feral ponies of Assateague, off the coast of Virginia, also qualify! Henry begins the story with the possible origin of Misty`s ancestors: they may have been the survivors of a shipwrecked Spanish galleon. She then brings the tale up to the 20th century and introduces young Paul and Maureen Beebe, who are longing to keep a pony for themselves, instead of merely breaking them in for others. The rest of the book deals with their efforts to do just this. Paul has his heart set on the wild mare Phantom, but the siblings hav`nt reckoned on the attachment they develop to her young foal, Misty. The author is expert at capturing the depth of feeling that one can have for an animal, especially that of a child or youth who has just discovered this phenomenon. As well as being informative about Assateague and its neighboring island, Chincoteague[home of the Beebe family], and the annual Pony Penning Day round-up, Henry gives the reader a realistic picture of two young people dealing with a real moral dilemma: whether to give the Phantom her freedom. Misty is a rewarding book, no matter if you`re a child or an adult when you read it. I also give high marks to its two sequels. There just are not many writers like Marguerite Henry these days.
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Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Like many of the other posters, I read Misty of Chincoteague when I was a child and loved it. I then went on to read all of Marguerite Henry's books. Recently my daughter and her children vacationed in the area of Assateague and Chincoteague Islands. I had forgotten all about the wild horses, but my daughter's experience made me recall the book about Misty. My public library no longer carried it so I ordered it. The book is just as good as I remembered it to be.

My only complaint is the claim that this is a library edition. The book looks just like the one in the picture, but after I opened it I questioned the library edition description. It looks like a paperback inside with a nice hardcover outside. Maybe the pages are made out of recycled paper or something, but they look cheesy and are definitely not of the high quality that would stand up to library usage.

For this reason and this reason only, I am giving the book 4 stars instead of 5, my apologies to the author's family. My criticism regarding the quality of the paper the book is printed on does not reflect Marguerite Henry's legacy. My only wish is that today's children have the opportunity to read this fine book whatever the paper quality. Now I feel bad about the 4 stars, but since I can't rate it 4.5, this will have to do.
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