Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.50
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by bookbazaars
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: The book may be marked, and have considerable heavy wear. For textbooks, may not be included CD, access code, or other supplements. Pages may have a number of folds/creases and may include considerable notes and highlighting but text is legible. Shipped fast, your satisfaction is guaranteed.ÿ
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Money for Nothing: One Man's Journey through the Dark Side of Lottery Millions Paperback

3.8 out of 5 stars 74 customer reviews

See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
$3.64 $2.97
--This text refers to the Preloaded Digital Audio Player edition.

Security
ITPro.TV Video Training
Take advantage of IT courses online anywhere, anytime with ITPro.TV. Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

This is a tell all book about the largely unregulated but legal industry that sells money to lottery winners in exchange for a portion of their future lottery payments. Having worked in this industry for The Firm, as Ugel refers to his former employer, we learn that in states that allow such sales, this industry follows lottery winners who are often people who suddenly receive and mismanage a lot of unexpected money: often impulsive, poorly educated, lacking good advisors. When they need fast cash, The Firm and others capitalize on their need, again, legally. This also is the story of gambling, the pervasive industry in our society from lotteries to casinos to video poker games and more. Ugel, a gambler since age 19, tells a sordid tale of gambling addiction, and we all have much to learn from the author's important perspective on the proliferation of gambling opportunities. Written in an informal, sometimes humorous manner, this book contains excellent information for library patrons. Whaley, Mary --This text refers to the Preloaded Digital Audio Player edition.

Review

“For anyone who’s ever dreamed of winning the lottery, this is a terrifying look at what really happens when someone hands you that huge cardboard check. Ugel’s writing style is terrific.” (Ben Mezrich, New York Times bestselling author of Bringing Down the House and Busting Vegas)

“A jackpot of sleaze and hilarity” (The Oregonian (Portland))

“A breezy, funny writer.... Maybe this eye-opening book will galvanize a movement.... By turns amusing and alarming.” (Kirkus Reviews)

“His tale is a colorfully written account by a self-proclaimed overweight, chain-smoking, Krispy Kreme doughnut-eating, fanatical gambler....You will lick your chops, eager to hear the sordid woes of winners gone broke from spending sprees.” (USA Today)

“Ugel’s natural showmanship makes for entertaining reading. He does little to pretty up his misdeeds (heck, they were legal) and offers comical vignettes of his rendezvous and run-ins with prospective clients while delivering a well-deserved scathing indictment of the government-backed lottery system.” (Library Journal)

Ugel, a gambler since age 19, tells a sordid tale of gambling addiction, and we all have much to learn from the author’s important perspective on the proliferation of gambling opportunities. Written in an informal, sometimes humorous manner, this book contains excellent information for library patrons. (Booklist)

“[A] sordid--and highly engaging--tale” (Wall Street Journal) --This text refers to the Preloaded Digital Audio Player edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperBusiness; Reprint edition
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SB8Q7S
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (74 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,697,792 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kcorn TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I urge you to read this fascinating story of one man who worked for "The Firm", a company who gave cash payments to lottery winners who (not surprisingly) needed those payments all too often - even after winning the lottery.

As you've probably heard (and it is true) lottery winners often don't understand how to manage their winnings or how the money is paid out. That is where people like Mr. Ugel come in, earning a living from the ignorance of the winners. Before you rush to judgment, you can be sure that Ugel judges HIMSELF - and is quite open about his own shortcomings. That was what made the book so fascinating for this reader, as well as the way he interspersed his own life story with the job. It became clear that he wasn't so different from those he fleeced.

This is a very honest look at one side of the lottery business, one that allows people like Edward Ugal to make deals with lottery winners and -by his own admission - make a living by using their weaknesses to gain an advantage. But here's the kicker: Ugel did so well at this because he was as much a victim of this gambling bug as his victims.

If you are expecting a book which focuses only on lottery winners and losers, this book isn't that sort. Instead, it is a revealing look at one man's life as well as the lottery business. It jumps back and forth in time quite a bit. Even so, I found it very entertaining as well as sobering. It sure cured me of any desire to gamble!

It all makes for one riveting book. I couldn't put it down. Prepare yourself to be both entertained and diverted as well as ready for the unexpected. This one doesn't go where you think it will but it is honest, informative and enlightening.

It is no secret that gambling and games like poker have captured the public imagination, perhaps more so than ever before. Read this book and up your learning curve!
17 Comments 37 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Money For Nothing, by Edward Ugel is deceiving. It's so entertaining, so laugh-out-loud funny that you don't realize you're getting serious insights into human nature.

It made me think of the tried and true therapy trick: if money weren't an issue, what would you do? If you've always been worried about financial security you have a tendency to think that enough money would solve a multitude of problems. But as Ugel's book so artfully show us, that is hardly the case. There are clearly many more problems than solutions for the hapless lottery winners...and the business people who serve them. Movies and television have done us all such a disservice, that it is refreshing to see the happy high roller myth debunked.

What makes this memoir work for me is Ugel's self deprecating humor and the way it masks his very real regrets.In the same way that the best crime dramas show detectives lamenting their similarities to the criminals they pursue, Money For Nothing reveals how even the most glamorous jobs are still work, not hobbies. And in this case work erodes even the most successful and jaded salesman's moral fiber.

Ugel is brutally honest about himself and his shortcomings. It's a courageous first book and I look forward to his next...is there one?
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
You win the lottery and think you are an instant millionaire! THINK AGAIN!! Ugel has written a true story of his experience working for a company he is forbid to name, tracking down high end lottery winners who receive monthly payments instead of one lump sums. Your number comes up, you are excited, and then when you run to turn in your ticket, discover that the 3 million dollars will be taxed at
50 + %, and then you will receive approximately $70,000 yearly for multiple years..... Doesn't exactly make you rich! Thats where the "firm" comes in. They will hound, harass, beg, borrow and even steal to gain the right to your monthly payment IN EXCHANGE for a huge amount of interest so they can graciously hand you over a larger lump sum.

Many paragraphs were repetive, and even boring. I suspect this is because he mentions early in the book that when he became employed with "the Firm," he had to sign a wavier stating he would never ever disclose any details of anything having to do with the Firm. Given the restrictions on his employment application, I feel Ugel did an excellent job of informing the public of as much information as he was legally allowed to do. Basically, there are hundreds of firms who zero in on lottery winners (and now people who are awarded annunities from accidents payable over a certain time), and try to "buy"
their annual payments. In doing so, the person looses A LOT of money, but the company gets richer and richer.

Ugel spent time discussing his own battle with playing machine poker in the casinos, and his feelings of taking money from clients when he knew the deal would hurt them.

This book is NOT about how lottery winners spend money, but rather how people take advantage of these winners, and track them down at all costs.
Read more ›
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
For someone who spent so long in a strange industry that buys out lottery winners, this author doesn't have many weird stories to tell. Most of this is about his office politics, which we don't really care about. He pads almost every paragraph with extraneous blather which reveals that he must be a world class motor-mouth in person. We already know that lotteries are won mainly by the poor and the blue collar. Everyone else sees them for what they are: taxes on the poverty stricken. I wish the writer had recounted more about the hard luck winners, and less about the brilliance of his boss, Ben, and the idiocies of Ben's replacement. You won't learn much from this book that you don't already know, which is disappointing.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: gambling books