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Money (Rougon-Macquart) Paperback – March 20, 2007

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Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

?mile Zola was a French writer who is recognized as an exemplar of literary naturalism and for his contributions to the development of theatrical naturalism. Zola s best-known literary works include the twenty-volume Les Rougon-Macquart, an epic work that examined the influences of violence, alcohol and prostitution on French society through the experiences of two families, the Rougons and the Macquarts. Other remarkable works by Zola include Contes ? Ninon, Les Myst?res de Marseille, and Th?r?se Raquin.

In addition to his literary contributions, Zola played a key role in the Dreyfus Affair of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. His newspaper article J Accuse accused the highest levels of the French military and government of obstruction of justice and anti-semitism, for which he was convicted of libel in 1898. After a brief period of exile in England, Zola returned to France where he died in 1902. ?mile Zola is buried in the Panth?on alongside other esteemed literary figures Victor Hugo and Alexandre Dumas.

Andrew Moore is a Bible Code researcher and mathematician who has studied the subject for over 30 years. His studies of the "Divine Mathematician" continue at his home in Lakewood, New York.

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Product Details

  • Series: Rougon-Macquart
  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: Mondial (March 20, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595690638
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595690630
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,702,408 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Karl Janssen on May 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
This novel follows the exploits of Aristide Saccard, a financial wheeler-dealer in Second Empire Paris. His former wealth wiped away by investment schemes gone bad, Saccard looks for his next big windfall. Luckily, he meets a neighbor, Hamelin, an engineer with grand designs to develop railroads, mines, dams, and shipping companies in the Middle East. The engineer and the financial wizard join forces to make both their dreams come true. Saccard founds the Universal Bank to fund Hamelin's projects, and it becomes all the rage in the Paris Bourse (stock market). While Hamelin's intentions are noble, Saccard's primary interest in the venture is personal financial gain and self-aggrandizement. In order to push up his company's value, he manipulates figures illegally and lies to his investors.

Saccard is a personification of the greed and opportunism rampant in France at the time, and his unwise investors personify that period's growing mania for financial speculation. It's amazing how relevant the book is to this day. The Universal Bank could just as well be named Enron or Worldcom, and foreign investment in the Middle East is certainly a current concern. Another issue that Zola tackles in this book is anti-Semitism. Though Zola himself was not an anti-Semite, he makes Saccard a hater of Jews in order to depict the mind-set of many Parisians at that time. One of the functions of Saccard's Universal Bank is to create a repository of Catholic money to rival the Jewish-owned banks, an actual goal of some Parisian businessman of the time. Regardless of the historical social commentary, one can enjoy this novel purely for its intricately-drawn characters and its insights into human nature.
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By A Customer on October 27, 1999
Format: Paperback
Set in the heroic golden age of nineteenth century capitalism, this belated sequel to the second book in the Rougon-Macquart cycle, "La Curée", tells you in Zola's inimitable style about how the stock market works and the psychology of market players. Nothing has really changed since it was written over a hundred years ago. Read it and you may avoid losing your life savings in some scam or other, or you may find some ideas for a scam of your own. You would not be the first, if some recent scandals are anything to go by. If you're Jewish you may not like some of the remarks made by the book's main character, Aristide, but remember Zola's honourable role in the Dreyfus affair only a few years later. Now go and check the stability of your bank while you've still got the chance.
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Format: Paperback
"L'Argent/the Money" finishes up the story of Arstide Saccard; it takes over where the novel "La Curee/The Kill" leaves off. It shows the life in all its forms. The last two sentences of the novel give a philosophical description of the role of money and why so many vices are tied with it.

The novel shows how easy it was in those days to take a roller-coaster ride from poverty to richness and back to poverty. It narrates about early days of capitalism, when no antitrust regulations existed. One should also bear in mind that all the utopian talk of Sigizmund Busch about classless society and money becoming obsolete was seen (from the way it is conveyed in the novel) as daydreaming.

The novel walks through such important events of the XIXth century as: the Mexican expedition, building of the Suez Canal, the Austro-Italian War, the Prussian conquest of small duchies and the Paris World Exhibition of 1867. Shortly after all these events France was struck by the infamous Dreyfus Affair and the novel does a good job describing the atmosphere that led to it, because there is hardly a chapter where the main character does not make inflammatory statements about the Jews.

All in all, it is a classic novel, not only about the money, but about the humanity, as well.
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The foundation of the book -- an attempt to corner the market on the Paris Bourse -- is very nuanced and something I recommend for today's Wall Street players for the intricacies Zola describes. Unfortunately (and be aware of this) the novel is translated by Viztelly who saw no problem in editing Zola for his English readers. The results suppress key aspects of the novel, which is a shame that deserves a better translation by someone working with the Oxford Classics series.

Still a worthwhile read for the financial matters, but it could have been so much more with a good translator.
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