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on November 16, 2017
Re-read Moneyball for the second time and it gets better the second time around. Lewis has put together a fine snapshot of the arrogance of “old school” baseball and the refusal to accept that there just might be a better way to make mousetrap, or field baseball team that Beane and the A’s constructed.
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on May 17, 2017
Michael Lewis is a great author, and this book is another solid piece by him. Eye-opening look at the sport, and if you're a fan things will make more sense to you when you start screaming at your team about drafting some fat washed up guy.
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on March 20, 2017
Have watched the movie several times, wanted more information. This was more than I needed, but satisfied my curiosity about the underlying facts and the reality of the story. Baseball fans would probably love the book more than I did!
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on October 4, 2016
Glad that I finally read this book. Having played rotisserie baseball for years, I was exposed to many of the aspects shown in this book. It was great to see how the writer could clearly expose the baseball biases by allegedly honest men. Loved the book and will continue to enjoy baseball the way it should be enjoyed.
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on March 4, 2017
Great read for baseball fans. A bit colored by the popular movie - frequently drawn back to moments dramatized by the film. Still some interesting insights on the history of baseball metrics.
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on April 16, 2012
It's a team sport. That is what I have been told since my days of tee ball. However, contrary to what your parents and coaches have said, baseball is not a team sport. Basketball, football, soccer, hockey; these are team sports. Players must constantly strategize and use each other's abilities to succeed. Baseball, however, is a saga of individual narratives. Pitcher versus the hitter. Fielder versus the fly ball. Runner versus the fielder's arm. Unlike other sports, in baseball the defense has the ball thus it has the upper hand in controlling the sport. This is what makes baseball unique and utterly exhilarating.

Moneyball documents the modernization of Major League Baseball. Billy Beane, the general manager of the Oakland Athletics, has to figure out a way to win an unfair game. His team is from a small market, meaning he does not have nor should he ever expect to have the money and payroll of large market teams. Assembling a baseball team by conventional methods would only guarantee failure. So Billy Beane looks for something different. What he finds isn't anything new, but radically different. He finds moneyball. Using the numbers, data, stats, facts, figures, records, and other ridiculous items popularized by Bill James and assembled by his young squad of Ivy League economists, Billy Beane puts together a team of outcasts, misfits, and freaks that all have one very important feature: they get on base.

Though there are plenty of critics of Billy Beane, sabermetrics, and the whole new way of baseball, there is one thing you cannot deny - it worked. The Oakland A's proved that you can build a team using the numbers and win and win big. Baseball guys hate this because it takes their experiences and flushes it down the toilet.

You cannot deny the impact Moneyball has had on Major League Baseball. Every team today has a small army of baseball number nerds doing calculations.

For those you want to know how the movie and book compare: the book gives you a realistic picture while the movie puts together a great story that incorporates all the information and challenges in the book.
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I never understood nor really liked baseball. I bought the book mostly to read about the inspired use of statistics, and the creative thinking that went into looking for the real keys to victory. I can safely say that while I may not have fallen in love with baseball, I will never find it boring again. If you have someone you want to turn into a fan, this book a superb gift option. The amount of detail in this book--for example, just the description of the strike zone and what different pitches and batters do to narrow the zone, what can be known about specific individual propensities and vulnerabilities associated with that little box, are truly inspirational.

This is a really excellent book. If we managed the national security budget the way Billy Bean managed the Oakland A's, we'd have faster better cheaper military hardware, and a lot more plowshares. I was also impressed by the way in which Billy Bean built a team, in which players who might not have been individual stars excelled at setting up others in a true team effort where the group as a whole is stronger than the sum of the parts. Others have written better reviews from a baseball fans point of view--as a non-baseball fan, I can attest to this book's being an "aha" experience.

See also:
Watching Baseball Smarter: A Professional Fan's Guide for Beginners, Semi-experts, and Deeply Serious Geeks
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on April 13, 2015
Though the book had been on my "deferred for future reading" shelf for about a year, I had to read it after seeing the movie last week. Loving baseball as I do, big MLB fan since age 12 (over six decades ago) I never knew much about Billy Beane and paid little attention to the Oakland A's though I lived within 12 miles of their stadium during during the Chuck Finley and Catfish Hunter days. What an interesting man Beane turned out to be! The book is written by one of my favorite, most versatile, authors. I think if Michael Lewis wrote a book about sandpaper I would be first in line to buy it. This book measures up to the other four I have read by this author - America's best storyteller!

Try it, you'll like it!
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on December 19, 2015
Outstanding. A work of non-fiction--about baseball and statistics no less--that is highly readable. This isn't surprising as Lewis also wrote Liar's Poker, a surprising page turner about a young man working at Salomon Brothers on Wall Street in the 1980s. Whether you're a baseball fan or not, you'll probably be fascinated by the wheeling, dealing, signing and artful trading of players that Lewis so skillfully depicts.

Borrowed the movie DVD from a friend but returned it unwatched. I often like to value a book on its own terms (without the hype and Hollywood treatment) and this is one of those times.
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on June 13, 2016
Awesome.

Extremely well written. Gripping. I just the other day read the book about Bernie Madoff by Markopolos. Very similar experience, a fascinating story that you just can't stop reading.

One of the coolest things about the book for me was the way it was like a bunch of fascinating mini-biographies within a broader story. For example the story of Chad Bradford.

I bet it felt good to write the addendums rebutting the old guard sportswriters and baseball team staffers who spewed a lot of nonsense.
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