Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Trade in your item
Get a $3.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Monkees: The Day-By-Day Story of the 60s TV Pop Sensation Paperback – June 10, 2005

4.8 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$48.00 $36.09

Ace the ACT.
Wiley Architecture, Construction, & Design Sale
Save up to 40% on select architecture, construction, and design guides during August. Learn more.
click to open popover

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Music historian Sandoval obsessively covers concerts, recordings and TV in pursuit of all Monkees trivia. Beginning with the 1942–1945 births of the quartet members (Peter Tork, Michael Nesmith, Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones), Sandoval traces their solo careers until the four were brought together in 1966 for NBC's The Monkees TV series, followed by hit albums through the late '60s. With a complete "Songography," 135 illustrations, a TV episode guide, lengthy interview quotes and exhaustive research through thousands of press clippings, Sandoval and designer Paul Cooper deliver a strong package, including captivating notes on Jack Nicholson's soundtrack work for the 1968 Monkees movie, Head, which was made the year before Nicholson gained recognition as an actor in Easy Rider. Unfortunately, the book has many speculative passages and an awkward use of present and future tense, resulting in such strained sentences as "No tapes will survive from this date, and it is quite possible that no takes are made today. Peter will return to the song in January." All the same, devoted Monkees fans will be pleased. (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Thunder Bay Press (June 10, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592233724
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592233724
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #420,209 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Over the years, several authors have detailed the story of the 1960s pop/rock band The Monkees with varying degrees of success. Most books were published in the mid to late 1980s, conveniently released at the height of The Monkees' resurgence in popularity following their mega-successful 20th anniversary arena tour. Derided by their critics in their heyday for being manufactured and pre-packaged, yet appealing to the masses with four consecutive number one albums, an Emmy-winning television series and countless Top 20 hits, The Monkees were and still can be one of the most misunderstood acts of all time. Luckily for the group, The Monkees experienced a critical rehab of sorts stemming from their initial 1986 MTV-inspired regrouping. Most music critics/authors nowadays (whose noses are not up in the air) give The Monkees their rightful due. The television show was innovative and funny, and their songs are some of the finest pop classics of the 1960s that still earn radio play today.

Until this book, painstakingly compiled by longtime Monkees historian Andrew Sandoval, no one author in particular has been able to truly capture the inner workings and the day to day occurrences of The Monkees as a functioning unit. Eric Lefcowitz and his book The Monkees Tale (available on Amazon.com) does a fine job telling the basic story of the band from inception to reunion. Harold Bronson's coffee table book, Hey Hey, We're The Monkees, acts as a nice supplement to it, featuring old stories and anecdotes as directly quoted from the band members. However, both books do not break any new ground.

Sandoval's book, meanwhile, delves into new territory that until now was never recorded.
Read more ›
Comment 57 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Andrew Sandoval's 15+ year relationship as THE Monkees archivist for Rhino's various reissues reaches it's apex with the release of this wonderfully detailed book. Some musical purists/snobs will frown at this much attention lavished at a pre-fabricated unit whose creative run really only lasted about three years, but hard-core fans (there's more out there than you would think) and pop culture students will dig the results:it does for the Monkees what Mark Lewishon has done for the Beatles and Keith Badman for the Beach Boys.

Great layout, with plenty of cool (rare) b&w photos and press clippings. There's only a 1 1/2 page overview of Monkee happenings post-1970, but the books' final 20 pages include a very detailed session musician index as well as a song by song (unreleased as well) sessiongraphy that to this reader was worth the 20 bucks alone..
Comment 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
the other reviewers have commented fairly well about the book's merits. i wanted to just raise one quibble - the group's work on the television show is given massively short shrift. indeed, this is essentially the day by day story of the monkees as recording and touring artists, not the story of their days on set, their days working with interesting guest stars, their days developing an improvisational style on set, their relationships with directors or crew members or any of that. given that the monkees would never have reached any level of musical success without the backbone of the show, it seems horrible to ditch james frawley from the narrative after only one quote, or ignore the inner workings of the series. it's a minor quibble, but i was disappointed to see it missing. i can understand why - it's probably not as well documented as the sessions, which had union records to evaluate; but it's clear sandoval had interview access with many major players, and chose to just focus on the music.
1 Comment 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a jaw-dropping volume of research from the world's foremost authority on the Monkees, painstakingly assembled and magnificently presented. I can hardly believe it exists! The only book it can be compared to is Mark Lewisohn's THE BEATLES RECORDING SESSIONS, which has (incredibly! impossibly!) been allowed to go out of print.

The lesson, Monkee fans? Grab it while you can. You know who you are.
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The Monkees remains a lightning rod in music annals. Condemned as a "manufactured group" by certain music types even today, the group's following has never wavered, and the last twenty years has seen not only a revival of interest in The Monkees but some spirited rebuttals to the condemnation of the group's conception and the quality of their music.

Music historian Andrew Sandoval fills in multiple gaps with his day-by-day chronology of the group from their earliest struggles as individuals to make a name for themselves in show business on through the five-year-period within which they were brought together, created the television series that not only remains for the most part fresh and funny 40 years after shooting commenced but also accelerated the development of the music video concept, engaged in the creation of hit music, fought to assert creative control of the music, reached their artistic and financial peak, and then began the slow process toward eventual breakup.

A key to the book's completeness is that it wisely includes Michael Nesmith's First National Band period of 1970, for it best displays how much of a backbone Michael Nesmith truly was to the group, both in terms of leadership and also in terms of musical strength.

The book goes into perhaps the strongest detail yet on the pivotal January 1967 showdown with Don Kirshner and Colgems lawyer Herb Moelis in which an infuriated Nesmith punched open a wall and snarled "That could have been your face." Don Kirshner is allowed to tell his side of the story, both in terms of this incident and his overall involvement with the group, and it becomes clear that even 40 years later the incident still stings him.
Read more ›
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews