Buy New
$79.89
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping. Details
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by cds_dvds_guaranteed and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Monster in a Box: The Mov... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get up to a $0.34
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Monster in a Box: The Movie

4.5 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
DVD
(Nov 28, 2006)
"Please retry"
1
$79.89
$64.95 $40.43
DVD
"Please retry"
$182.78

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$79.89 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 3 left in stock. Sold by cds_dvds_guaranteed and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Monster in a Box: The Movie
  • +
  • Swimming To Cambodia
  • +
  • And Everything Is Going Fine (Criterion Collection)
Total price: $116.75
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Legendary monologuist Spalding Gray takes you on an unforgettable and often hilarious journey through the pitfalls of the creative mind in this brilliant follow-up to his critical and audience favorite, Swimming to Cambodia. Interacting with his audience and backed by a score from Laurie Anderson, Gray recounts the story of his attempts to write a manuscript and the bizarre tangents his everyday life and creative persona underwent in the process.

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Spalding Gray
  • Directors: Nick Broomfield
  • Writers: Spalding Gray
  • Producers: Jon Blair, Norman I. Cohen, Renée Shafransky
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    PG-13
    Parents Strongly Cautioned
  • Studio: Image Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: November 28, 2006
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000I2J72C
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #147,469 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Monster in a Box: The Movie" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Greg Cleary on April 15, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There was nobody else like Spalding Gray. If you're curious about his work (and you should be), you should start by watching either "Swimming to Cambodia" or this film. They are worth owning, because you will probably want to watch them again and again and show them to your friends. "Monster in a Box" is my favorite. Watching it again recently, I realized that Gray could've been one of the greatest comedians of all time, and he certainly would've earned more money and fame as a comedian, yet it would've been a waste of his talents. He had too much to say about life to confine himself like that. And so he used that rarest of art forms, the autobiographical monologue.

"Monster in a Box" is about a lot of things. It's about the difficulty of writing a long work of prose. (The "Monster" in the title is the manuscript for a book he was working on, which I have read, by the way. The finished work is very good, although not as long as the manuscript.) It's about the film industry. It's about a fact-finding mission to Nicaraugua in the 80s. It's about Gray's fears about his own physical and mental health. It's about a trip to Russia for screenings of "Swimming to Cambodia." It's about Gray's role in a Broadway production of "Our Town." And much more.

But a summary of the content does not capture what this monologue is really about. Gray was an intense person who was trying his best to be true to his nature without being completely miserable. I saw him perform "It's a Slippery Slope" in Eugene, Oregon, in 1995 or' 96, and he was fantastic. He walked out onto the stage, sat down at a table with a glass of water, and talked for about 90 minutes. The audience was riveted. I wish a film version of that monologue was available.
Read more ›
Comment 20 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
Monster in a Box is another film version of one of Spaulding Gray's monologues, taped live at the Performing Garage, the home of The Wooster Group in New York City. The film captures the feel of the live performance and heightens it with music and close-ups. The "monster" in the box is an autobiography that Mr. Gray has been trying to work on concerning the death of his mother. The monologue details the obstacles, blocks, and epiphinal moments in trying to pen his tome. The monologue also contains many anecdotes about what happened to his life after the success of his first movie, Swimming to Cambodia. It also covers his adventures in Hollywood and his mixed emotions about being the Stage Manager in Thorton Wilder's Our Town at Lincoln Center. Gray is a story teller of rare talent. He's able to probe so far into the complexity of his own life that an audience feels compelled and, ultimately, empathetic. If you enjoyed Swimming to Cambodia or just a good story, Monster in a Box is a great film to see.
1 Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: VHS Tape
What a relief. Somebody intelligent on film. No explosions, no car chases. And I was spellbound from start to finish, and laughed so hard I thought my bad eye would pop out. Highly recommended as an antidote to Pokemon and South Park.
Comment 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
While - for me - this is not quite up to the brilliance of ‘Swimming to Cambodia’ or even ‘Gray’s Anatomy’ (both are more focused and emotional) Spalding Gray’s story telling -- loosely revolving around his attempts to finish is huge autobiographical novel -- is so delightful, funny and sometimes sad that it makes for terrific, intelligent entertainment. Seated simply behind desk, with the illusion of it all being filmed in front of a live audience (that cheat is a little awkward at moments), this is a set of wonderfully amusing, cranky, self-critical, satirical observations made by a master.

Of course, in light of Gray's suicide, the poignancy is only heightened, both in realizing the pain the man carried (and both acknowledged but somewhat covered with his humor), and in the loss we all suffered when his unique voice was snuffed out.

It seems awful to me that this DVD has gone out of print and is so absurdly expensive. With the number of fans Gray had, and the popularity of some of his later works, it seems prime material for Criterion, or a small label to make available once again. Let's hope.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on February 14, 2002
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Only this guy can do this stuff. It's got hints of performance art but essentially he's just an old fashioned story teller telling modern, intelligent and very funny stories.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
this film could have been SG's suicide note but years in advance of his jumping off the staten island ferry in winter to his death in 2004. most viewers think the monster in the box is the book he was writing of the same name. he lets you go down that route if you wish. however, there is another box, the one containing his mother's ashes which is still in his father's bedroom. that box beckons him to enter it as well. time goes on and finally he too enters the box, no longer able to handle the demons of his own life. he gives us intimations of this beckoning box throughout the film, such as when he tells us how his mother simply asked him one day, "how shall i do it?" also, the many times he tried to leave his mother, packing up his car, driving away, only to drive back, unpack the car and rejoin her. the car, the mother's house and his luggage all being more boxes to the very dark box of suicide and death. i think of this film more as a complementary piece to william styron's classic DARKNESS VISIBLE than as a meditation about the difficulty of writing a book.

Visit my blog with link given on my profile page here or use this phonetically given URL (livingasseniors dot blogspot dot com). Friday's entry will always be weekend entertainment recs from my 5 star Amazon reviews in film, tv, books and music. These are very heavy on buried treasures and hidden gems. My blogspot is published on Monday, Wednesday & Friday.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video