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Showing 1-10 of 201 reviews(1 star). See all 3,615 reviews
on January 29, 2009
Although I feel silly for reading these books that are meant for 13 year old girls, I decided to finish the series since I have wasted so much time on them already. My biggest problem with this series is that Bella lacks any redeeming qualities. I feel like they are sending a disturbing message to the target audience....that girls (who eventually grow up to be women) measure their self worth based on men. Yeah, we get it, Edward is perfect in appearance and personality and Bella is not worthy of him. This is repeated for 500 pages. But, she is so utterly co-dependent that she can hardly function when Edward leaves her. She has zero self-esteem which I feel is something we all struggle with, but why repeat it over and over again? Of course she has shortcomings, it wouldn't be realistic if she didn't. But what happened to the strong female heroine with qualities that young women should aspire to have? That they can go on living and functioning despite the fact that they are alone. I can read these books and appreciate that they are silly and insignificant, but young teenage girls may think this is how women are supposed to think and feel. On a positive note, if you are looking for superficial, mindless and(somewhat) interesting books, these books will quench that thirst.
5 helpful votes
6 helpful votes
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on March 31, 2010
I started this series as my youngest daughter was interested. She would read me passages, great phrases, and chapter endings which left her hanging. There were many.
However, when I looked at the whole story I was disappointed. I got the author's strong message of "just say no" to sex in the first book, and I was able to get past it because the story was interesting. Here the theme was repeated ad nauseum and in the most unbelievable fashion. Most blatantly at the ending. I mean, after all this vampire has seen in his 109 years of life, after the threat of starting up a war with the werewolves for turning Bella into a vampire, his biggest concern is that Bella marry him first?!
But the horrible "will you marry me first before I turn you into a vampire" ending was not my biggest problem.
The most horrible offense, especially as a mother of two daughters, was the lack of character given Bella. When Edward dumped Bella, she had no good friends, no hobbies, no passions of her own...except to try to get Edward back.
I'm finding a new series for my daughter.
3 helpful votes
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on August 20, 2016
Curiosity can be a dangerous thing. But did I listen ten years ago? Oh, of course not. Time-machine to the present and why on earth did I re-read this? Even my inner 12-year old was screaming at me "No!! not again." Between the melodrama, Bella's martyr complex (no character is allowed to suffer as much as Bella because she's suffering more than everyone because she's suffering for everyone.) The adjective overuse. One isn't allowed to merely look at another person. The looks are either triumphal,exultant, glorious, or smoldering, the list goes on. (also used to described eyes and smiles.) Plot? alas, look elsewhere. There are some excellent reading choices out there, I just wasn't all that delighted w/ this one. Enjoy!
2 helpful votes
3 helpful votes
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on November 8, 2009
Spoiler Alert!!!

I've never felt strongly enough about any book to actually write a review about it, and I may never do it again, but here goes...

I'm not a professional athlete, but I understand the rules to all the major sports and I know when players are breaking those rules. The same goes with writing. As a guy in his early 40s, I'm the first to admit I'm not the target audience for this book. But I read the first book right before that movie came out and because I understood who the book was written for, I was able to enjoy it for what it was. That was certainly not the case for New Moon. In my mind, there are some basic rules to story telling and it seems to me that Stephanie Meyer completely ignored them.

1. For the first half of the book, there is no identifiable plot. It's just chapter after endless chapter of Bella whining about how awful her life is and then jerking around and leading on the person she calls her best friend (the fact that she knows that's what she's doing doesn't make it any better). That's not a plot. That's the author making me seriously disliker her protagonist. The first thing that even resembles an actual plot is when she runs into Laurent and first sees the wolves in the meadow in chapter 10. In a book that's supposedly "about" werewolves, I should not be waiting until chapter 10 to actually see my first werewolf.

2. You don't spend half the book setting up the reader for a final confrontation and then NOT deliver it. When the plot finally did materialize and we found out that Victoria was back to get Bella, the book finally got interesting and I read it to the end, wondering about and waiting for the final confrontation between Victoria and/or Jacob and/or Edward. Instead, Bella suddenly disappears to Italy out of the blue, comes home three days later, and the book ends. Victoria just leaves, with virtually no explanations of why.

3. With the exception of Jacob, not one of the main characters changes or grows in any meaningful way through the course of this book. Bella, Charlie, the Cullens, they are all in the exact same place, physically and emotionally, that they were in at the start of the book. Again, I exclude Jacob from that statement. He, at least, had some serious character growth.

And 4. I admit this is more a personal thing. In a story that has taken place in entirely in one place, you don't suddenly change settings completely three quarters of the way through the book with no warning or set up. Taken by itself, the part of the book that takes place in Italy is actually the best written piece of the story in my opinion. But it felt out of place, like she started the process with a cool idea for a scene in the Volturi's city, and then she was bound and determined to cram it in and make it fit her current story.

I apologize to the fans of the series but for the first time EVER, I'm actually hoping that a movie does not stay faithful to the book.

Take this review for what it is, the opinion of someone well out of the target age range for this book, who picked it up wanting to like it, and was really diappointed.
11 helpful votes
12 helpful votes
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on May 29, 2011
"You can have my soul. I don't want it without you - it's yours already!..."

"His name burned my throat a little on the way out. I could feel the ghost of the hole, waiting to rip itself wide again as soon as he disappeared..."

"Every time I looked at his face, that impossibly perfect face, my heart pounded strong and healthy and very there in my chest..."

Are these Facebook posts by my sixteen year old new week/new-boyfriend cousin or lines from New Moon? Either way, you don't want to know any more...
2 helpful votes
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on October 14, 2008
Remember that time that your high school boyfriend left you and you became despondent and started doing crazy things to hallucinate his voice in your head? No? That's probably because you're a sane person with a healthy identity that is separate from your high school boyfriend's. Bella is not sane. Bella is completely out of her gourd in this book, and we get to see exactly how unhealthily obsessed with Edward she is.

I know that fiction is just that: fiction. I also realize that not all characters need to be likable or even have an iota of common sense. What bothers me about the Twilight books is that Ms. Meyer has created a world in which teenage hormones run free, completely unchecked by common sense, parents, or even reality. If I had a teenage daughter who slipped past the brink of sanity over a breakup with a boy she knew less than a year, I would be trying to rectify the situation. In Bella's world, her love (which is a sacred, pure, overwhelming love, the author assures us again and again) was so important that it's okay for her to just throw her entire life down the drain once Edward leaves her. School activities? Friends? Academics? None of it's important now that she doesn't have her man by her side (not that it was really that important to begin with; who could focus on being a strong and independent woman when there's a total hunk around?).

It's one think to suspend reality to prove a point or create an engaging world. However, suspending reality to let me read about a teenager who believes in soulmates is absurd.
5 helpful votes
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on January 16, 2016
Terribly written.
Misused semicolons, inappropriate and strange comma placing, contradictory verb tense agreement, dialogue worse than a B movie, absolutely no character depth, no character motivation, things happen for no reason, and the very worst is her prose. Sure, Twilight gets people reading so I'll praise Meyer for that, but she also may have just made an entire generation dumber.
2 helpful votes
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on July 17, 2013
With tons of young girls reading this series, it pains me to see characters like Bella. To the author's credit, she wrote a convincing enough character that I feel so strongly against her. Well done. But what an awful character to write! The story never changes. All 4 Twilight books are the same. Nothing surprising to report there.
1 helpful vote
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on April 23, 2014
The series so far is overrated. Im sick of bella and really she's in love at 18 yeah right the storyline so predictable. Im a sucker for love story but this is crap. Don't want young readers to get the wrong idea about love and relationships.
1 helpful vote
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on May 15, 2014
Very disappointing. Couldn't even bring myself to read past the first couple of chapters. Shallow and predictable. The first book was okay in general and had some really well-written passages, but I wouldn't bother with this one, and I won't get the rest.
1 helpful vote
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