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Morbius: The Living Vampire: The Man Called Morbius (Marvel Now) Paperback – December 10, 2013

3.6 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joe Keatinge is an American comic book writer and editor, best known as the co-editor of Popgun with Mark Andrew Smith.

Like many British-born comic-book creators, Richard Elson has an extensive background in U.K. series such as The Beano and the venerable science-fiction anthology 2000AD. Elson is also recognized for his artwork on Sonic the Comic. His pairing with writer Kieron Gillen on Thor led to a subsequent collaboration on Journey into Mystery.
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Product Details

  • Series: Morbius: the Living Vampire
  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Marvel (December 10, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0785183914
  • ISBN-13: 978-0785183914
  • Product Dimensions: 6.6 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,212,368 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was fan of Doctor Michael Morbius (Morbius The Living vampire) back in the 90s and devoured all the Marvel comics with the (apparently) bipolar and semi-whiny vampire. There was something amusing about him. The poor guy is an emo-vampire trope but rather ugly and has Charlie Brown's bad luck.

It was good to see him given a chance with a new story. My biggest problem was just a few things.

1. I have older comics where he would roast in the sun. When did that change?

2. They seriously diminished his transvection power, his power of flight. "I glide a bit." He used to hover and glide all over the place, it was his main form of transportation. Why down play it? I liked that power.

3. I'm not too fond of the idea of Morbius not sleeping. I can pinpoint older comics where he would rest by day. And in fact Nightmare (ruler of Dreams in the Marvel universe) had wanted to keep Morbius at one point because Morbius is immortal and Nightmare can feed off of Morbius forever. How can Morbius now claim he can't remember dreams when Doctor Strange once had to rescue him from a dream? These comics acknowledge he was a Midnight Son. That Nightmare incident happened back when he was a Midnight Son. Having him not sleep felt like a shameless slant toward the modern pop culture vampires, particularly a certain teen book series which should remain nameless. I'd remove half a star for this issue but I'm feeling generous.

Also I wanted to smack him every time he called himself vampire-ish. It's in the title! You're a vampire! Get over it! It's been forty three years in the Marvel universe, it's time to get past that denial thing. Personally I think dropping "Living vampire" all together and calling him "The Midnight Son" might be for the best.
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Format: Paperback
Spider-Man vampire villain Michael Morbius escapes the Raft, Spidey’s version of Arkham Asylum, and decides to lay low in a small town called Brownsville - there he becomes the downtrodden’s champion against the street gangs that rule the place.

A Morbius mini-series seems like a really weird choice to be a part of the first wave of Marvel NOW! launches (they went with Morbius over Black Widow, Ghost Rider, Silver Surfer and a dozen others?!) but it’s surprisingly ok, for at least half of it. Too many Marvel NOW! titles have as its premise, the end of the world, with the stakes being the death and extinction of everything and everyone, blah blah snore. In Morbius, he’s basically a bum, living on the streets and eating garbage, and the entire premise is this homeless vampire has to save this miserable little town from a guy who looks like a Road Warrior extra. I appreciate those surprisingly low stakes and prefer them over yet another tedious end of the world storyline (Jonathan Hickman, I’m looking at you!).

I also like that Morbius isn’t even that good of a hero – besides the unheroic act of killing people, he’s also really vulnerable to bullets. The number of times he gets shot in the chest and has to spend several pages recovering was comical to me. The action scenes played out like this: Morbius sees injustice. Morbius fights injustice. Injustice shoots him in the chest. Injustice escapes. Morbius lies in the dirt in pain. This happened a few times and made me chuckle at its repetition. Spidey ain’t got nothing on poor ol’ Morbius, lying there with adamantium bullets in his chest – he’s not mumbling some crap about “that old Peter Parker luck”!
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Format: Comic
Oh boy, where to start. It'd be easier and shorter to list all the things this comic did right.

While the art is nice, someone forgot to tell him who Morbius is. Morbius isn't a guy in panda makeup who eats sandwiches out of trashcans; Morbius is a science-created vampire with a flat bat nose, a distorted face, fangs, and blue skin who suffers from bloodthirst.

I don't think anyone told the writer who Morbius is either. He complains about his luck and bad choices more than Peter Parker and has more inner monologue than Daredevil. Instead of heading to anywhere he works (he doesn't try to rejoin A.R.M.O.R., anyone from any version of the Midnight Sons, or his many monster-buddies from underground. He doesn't even seek out Dr. Strange, Ghost Rider, or his 'oldest friend' from horizon labs or figure out where Doc Ock went and ask again to help out). Instead,he has no qualms showing up in broad daylight (doesn't that hurt?) with a shirt with big letters of the prison he just escaped from, in front of anyone who happened to be where he's going.

There's no plot, just a bunch of disjointed fight scenes, Morbius getting help from a bum he has no problem leaving as a witness to talk to the cops or superheroes and being told to go to a place Gotham gangs wouldn't go near, and then he's bothered by two losers as he tries to eat a trash sandwich in peace. Then Morbius uses the power of whining about how every sucks and he's not a good guy to heal himself and he goes to get himself shot again. Despite him mentioning other powers, we never see them again in this issue or following issues.

The only good part is Morbius trying to eat a decent snack and and his efforts keep getting ruined by other people until he finally gets a fresh sandwich. I have no idea why he wants one so badly, but all his effort made it hilarious to me.
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