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More Fun in the New World

4.7 out of 5 stars 39 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Elektra / Wea
  • ASIN: B000005IRQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #330,124 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's X Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Jonathan B Whitcomb on May 28, 2002
Format: Audio CD
X was one of the tragically overlooked American bands of the 1980s who made excellent, vital music while the hair bands ruled the airwaves. But nobody made a better album than this in the 1980s. The first side of the LP (yes, I'm dating myself) from "The New World" to "I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts" is spectacular. And side two is very good as well but not mind-blowing like side one. Years later this remix puts the punch back into the recording. And best of all this album still sounds fresh in 2002.
This is the last of the great albums from the original X lineup, and my favorite. "Los Angeles", "Wild Gift", "Under the Big Black Sun" and this one showed the band always growing and branching out from their punk roots. Following this the band lost its way with a lame attempt at sounding radio friendly ("Ain't Love Grand") and partially redeemed themselves with "See How We Are" which was spotty but had moments of brilliance.
X was never easy to pigeonhole and this album showcases everything that was good about the band: great songwriting, a sense of humor, unique harmonies, smart lyrics, amazing guitar work (Billy Zoom was awesome) and a true rock 'n' roll attitude.
If you haven't experienced X there's not a better place to start than right here.
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Format: Audio CD
X had a pitch perfect four album run in the early 80's - Los Angeles, Wild Gift, Under the Big Black Sun, and then More Fun in The New World were gifts to the music world. They're punk/ beat/ rockability explosions that each took a different foray into the ethos and assertion of rock at its most furious. More Fun had moments of great politics, like "The New World," the fist-pumping opener sung from the persona of a drunk who can't get booze on election day. But it also groped at painful emotions made only more painful in their constructions - "The Hot House" sings of romantic malaise under an ironically bounceable beat, and "I See Red" may be the loudest I-caught-you-cheating song ever recorded. John Doe and Exene Cervenka always had a slithering chemistry in their voices and writing that made them thrilling cohorts, and More Fun marked the last time the band had a creative vision. After this record, they made an unsettling couple of studio-friendly record, but this album proved this was the period where they were having much more fun.
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By A Customer on March 17, 2002
Format: Audio CD
It's an outrage there are only 9 other reviews of this album. This is, in my opinion, their best - with Wild Gift a close second. I remember my older sister listening to X a lot when I was growing up, but I honestly didn't really get into this band until this year when a listener-sponsored radio station played "I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts" while I was stuck in traffic and it blew my mind. I've been hooked ever since. Why all of the rock stations here in LA, X's home town, refuse to play this band remains a mystery. More Fun... is about the best rock album you'll ever buy. Play it loud.
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Format: Audio CD
This album is the follow up to their masterwork "Under the Big Black Sun." While they weren't able to capture the magic that makes it their best album, some of X's finest songs are found right here. I bought this album after hearing "Breathless" in the Richard Gere film of the same name. I rented the tape and just rewound the closing credits over and over to listen to Exene kick out this insane Jerry Lee Lewis song. Between her pounded out vocals and Zoom's attacking gutiar, I felt this giddy insanity in music that I had never heard before. (I was probably thirteen at the time.) When I got the name of the band off the credits, I RAN to the record store on the other side of town and bought "More fun" expecting that same explosive screaming music. As I found out, there was much more to X. The album's title track starts the album off in mid tempo with this great anti-anthemic gutiar riff. You can almost hear Regan telling us how great everything was and how much Exene disagreed with this sentiment. The rest of the first side stays pretty mid tempo including "Poor Girl" by john doe. If you like this song, check out X's Under the Big Black Sun. THis is X's best CD and doe's track here just sounds like it should have been on that album. The guy is a great crooner. "I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts," starts out subdued'folky and ends with a bang. THIS IS A GREAT SONG. THE PUNK VERSION OF THE BEATLE'S "A Day in the Life." BUY THIS ALBUM FOR THIS SONG ALONE. The second half of the album rocks. Here is where you fine "Breathless" "Devil Doll," "and "I See Red," another whirling dervish sung by Exene. This is a great band; for my money the best American band of the 80's, both lyrically and musically.Read more ›
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is the last truly great X record, a prophetic and wary look ahead at the worst excesses of the Reagan eighties. Like Los Angeles, Wild Gift and Under the Big Black Sun, Ray Manzarek guides their punk energy masterfully, producing short, sweet and pointed short stories masquerading as pop songs. The band was as tight as they would ever be (and as they still are today, as they've been touring on the gems from those four albums ever since). I'm hard pressed to think of a better rhythm section, a more charismatic pair of lead singers, or a more intelligent and varied set of musical influences within the punk rock scene.

So this album is ironic and rueful, worried about things like the "British Invasion" and the "last American band," about the conformist pressures of the trickle down theory of Reaganomics ("I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts"), confident enough to cover a classic like "Breathless," and brave enough to stretch out into uncharted areas like new wave (the afore-mentioned "Bad Thoughts") and funk ("True Love Pt. #2," which, believe it, is a dance song). They could freaking play anything at this point, and you won't find a more honest or poignant look at the state of things in the pop landscape of America 1983. Even with that kind of specificity, the songs haven't aged a day. They're too lean and mean to ever go out of style.
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