Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: A More Perfect Union: The Story of Our Constitution
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Customer Reviews

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on December 11, 2000
This book is great for Middle School Students or even High School Students who want to review the events leading to the Constitution. I am a Middle School Teacher and plan on using the book to review my lessons with my students. Next year I plan on using it to introduce the topic!
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on July 1, 2004
I came across one book by Betsy Maestro "The Discovery of the Americas" and I loved it. The text is simple and the illustrations are great. It is historically accurate as well, a must in my checklist. I didn't realize she also wrote the historical series "You Wouldn't Want to..." They are my favorite!! I recommend all of her books, especially for teachers.
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on August 14, 2012
In 1787 people in our country could see that the government wasn't working very well. Delegates gathered in Philadelphia to try to fix the government and ended up creating the Constitution and the government we now have. This book conscientiously walks us through a top-level view of what happened that summer in Philadelphia.

Many of the delegates were late to the convention. The book spends a total of four pages, two two-page spreads, on the late start. Is it so important?

George Washington was chosen as the leader of the convention. James Madison, according to the book, offered to write down everything that happened. The rest of the story continues on in the same rather uninteresting way.

The book recites the very basic facts of the summer of 1787 and the beginning job of putting the Constitution to work, such as electing a president. If a child needs an introduction to the writing of the Constitution, this would serve except that it's dull. There's no clash of personalities. Only the broadest clash of ideas is presented in the argument made by small states about how they are represented in Congress. The book doesn't even mention how the argument was resolved.

The illustrations don't add to or subtract from the book. They are simply present. And basically, the book has the same relationship to the events of the summer of 1787. It doesn't try to make the event's exciting, nor does it try to make them dull, it is simply present.

The last few pages contain "Additional Information about the Constitution." These are more valuable than the book itself. There's a summary of the Articles of the Constitution, and a summary of the Amendments to the Constitution. Plus "Notes on the Connecticut Compromise and "Interesting Facts about the Convention and the Delegates." These few pages make the book a great reference in a classroom learning about the Constitution.
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on January 19, 2007
This book gives an understandable view of how our Constitution came to be. It is good to read in context with studying other aspects of the colonial time period as well as the Revolutionary War. There is a great map at the beginning and resources at the back with the preamble as well as an explanation of the Articles and Amendments. There is a list of all the signers, a summary of important dates and bit of interesting facts about the convention and delegates. Definitely a good resource.
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on July 18, 2004
Maestro reviews the reasons for the Constitution, but fails to mention the Articles of Confederation. The text includes the Virginia, New Jersey, and Connecticut Plans. The book can easily be read as an introduction to the Constitution in one class period. Students could complete a drawing or group of drawings on a picture web to narrate the important details from the story.
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on October 13, 2012
The book recites the very basic facts of the summer of 1787 and the beginning job of putting the Constitution to work, such as electing a president.I think it is a good intro resource,but may be a little dull. I teach secial ed on the high school level(EH/LD)it is hard to keep their attention. I often use picture books to support or introduce a topic. The kids are on different reading levels and I often give them scavenger hunts and encourage the use of all books and resources I bring in,so they are not embaressed. The book has additional informational list in back. I think this is an adequate addition to my resource library.
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on March 17, 2014
We read this one at home and presented to our daughter's 1st Grade class for some quality history/civics lessons (to be read by teacher, since the book itself is more suitable for 3rd graders). The kids were fascinated by the real story of the efforts of many people who drafted the constitution.
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on April 23, 2016
True History is not being taught in our schools anymore. So i have decided as a grandmother i will do the correct teaching. I am building a library of true history for my grandchildren and future generations in our family.
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on April 18, 2015
The Maestro's do a fantastic job teaching the story of the Constitution through children's literature. Information is presented in manageable easy to understand pieces. This makes concepts conducive to scholar retention yielding a lasting impression.
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on February 5, 2016
This really irks me. They weren't 13 states, they were 13 colonies. There was no nation for a person (not a president) to lead, it was 13 colonies. School Library Journal and this author should have known better. I was looking forward to adding this to my list of books for my nonprofit organization to purchase. I guess I won't be buying it after all.
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