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Morrison Hotel

4.6 out of 5 stars 185 customer reviews

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Audio CD, March 26, 2013
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 26, 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rhino Flashback
  • ASIN: B00BGV0YD0
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (185 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,294 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
Although the Doors fourth album "The Soft Parade" (1969) had sold well and produced the smash hit "Touch Me," both fans and critics alike felt as though the band sold out. Compared to "The Doors" and "Strange Days" (both 1967) the band's more recent work had been viewed as overtly commercial. In the eyes of the Doors faithful, both "Waiting for the Sun" (1968) and "The Soft Parade" seemed to pale in comparison to the Doors first two albums. "The Soft Parade" in particular, with its strings and pop compositions, seemed to rub Doors fans and critics the wrong way. The negative feedback, however, ultimately worked to the Doors advantage. In response to the negative buzz, the Doors released what would ultimately be hailed as one of their finest albums "Morrison Hotel" (1970).

"Morrison Hotel" is neither a return to the sound of the Doors early albums nor is it a follow-up to the styling of its immediate predecessor "The Soft Parade." Rather, "Morrison Hotel" opens a new chapter in the Doors history all together. Gone were the psychedelic trimmings of the first two albums. Gone was the commercialism of the last two. "Morrison Hotel" is distinctly stripped down, and edgier. It was akin to what Credence Clearwater Revival were doing at the time. All in all, "Morrison Hotel" is an album of unadulterated, meat-and-potatoes, no-nonsense, blues-tinged, rock n' roll.

Although "Morrison Hotel" embraces a new sound, all the elements of the Doors are firmly in place; Jim Morrison's soulful baritone, John Densmore's jazzy percussion, Robbie Krieger's bluesy guitar, all the while peppered with Ray Manzarek's wholly unique signature organ and piano. So while "Morrison Hotel" sees the Doors exploring new ground, they do so in a way that doesn't forget what made the Doors, the Doors.
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Format: Audio CD
After a couple of albums that were more noted for hit singles that smacked too much of pop music for their fans, namely 1968's "Waiting for the Sun" with "Hello, I Love You" and 1969's "The Soft Parade" with "Touch Me," the Doors got back to their roots with "Morrison Hotel." This is clear from the opening track on this 1970 album, the rock 'n' booze anthem "Roadhouse Blues," which blasts this album into the stratosphere. Robbie Krieger's opening riff sets the tone and Ray Manzarek pounds away on the piano to establish the mood, with the whole thing capped off by Jim Morrison's vocalized howls. You can hear live versions of "Roadhouse Blues," but unfortunately none of them were ever performed in the perfect locale, which would have been a bar. But you can imagine how great it would sound to hear this one blasting the top off of some juke joint.

There are not any hit singles on the group's fifth studio album, which is undoubtedly why it went over better with the fans of the Doors, even if it only made it to #4 on the Billboard album charts. To help validate the blues the Doors brought in the great sessions jazz guitarist Ray Neopolitan, albeit as a bass player (the Doors never really bothered with one). The requisite touch of the exotic can be found in songs like "Waiting for the Sun," "Queen of the Highway," and "Indian Summer." Morrison, who was noticeably disengaged in terms of both his lyrics and his singing on previous albums, is back to waxing poetic big time, as evidenced by "Ship of Fools," which mixes nihilistic imagery with prospects for hope. Again, Morrison is found commenting on the counterculture, singing about how "Everyone was hanging out/Hanging up and hanging down/Hanging in and holding fast.
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Format: Audio CD
The original pressing (AFZ 037) was defective as there were crackles on Roadhouse Blues. The replacement pressing (AFZ 037-X) suffered the same issue. The second replacement pressing (AFZ 037-2) does not have the defects of the previous two.

If you purchase this disc from any retailer, be sure to contact AF to get the replacement.
1 Comment 21 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Audio CD
After the critical brickbats that greeted "The Soft Parade" (1969), Jim Morrison and company made a smashing return to form with their most cohesive album. "Morrison Hotel" (1970) has no misfires. "Roadhouse Blues," "You Make Me Real" and "Peace Frog" are among the hard-rock highlights - punctuated by effective ballads such as "Blue Sunday" and "Indian Summer." The Doors would take their blues-oriented sound even further on "L.A. Woman" (1971), but "Morrison Hotel" evokes the perfect bar-band atmosphere.
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By A Customer on October 16, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Released as The Doors Fifth album, "Morrison Hotel" is definitely my favorite album. I believe this CD has all the right ingredients to make it a true Rock & Roll/ R&B album. There isn't really a set style that The Doors stuck to when making this masterpiece. It is a collage of songs that were just all thrown onto one album and they ended up flowing together quite smoothly. As soon as the CD/cassette/record is thrown into the stereo the room that you are in will start to feel alive. "Morrison Hotel" opens up with "Roadhouse Blues" which is probably the most famous song on this album. This song is packed with a great sounding guitar by Mr. Robbie Krieger and the vocals on Mr. Jim Morrison are just incredible on not only this song but all of the songs that are collaged on this CD. Another great contribution to this song is Mr. John Densmore who plays an excellent set on his drums. Some people may argue that this opening song is not the most famous song here but if it's not "Roadhouse Blues," it has got to be "Waiting For the Sun." This song has a more toned down Morrison as does the rest of the album. Morrison starts off by exploding with his vocals and tones it down for the rest of "Morrison Hotel." The rest of the band keeps right on rockin' until the end. Another highlight on this album is the "Peacefrog"/ "Blue Sunday" combination. "Peacefrog" is definitely my favourite song on "Morrison Hotel." It is filled with a great bluesy guitar sound and Mr. Ray Manzarek makes his biggest appearance on keyboards here. "Peacefrog" really turns up the volume but the music slows right down at the end to flow into "Blue Sunday" which is a well sung ballad.Read more ›
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