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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it's still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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Moscow Rules (Gabriel Allon) Paperback – June 30, 2009

4.5 out of 5 stars 589 customer reviews
Book 8 of 15 in the Gabriel Allon Series

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Paul Gigante, who read Silva's Secret Servant, resumes his outstanding rendering of Gabriel Allon and his crew of Israeli counterterrorism experts. Once again, Gigante highlights Allon's strange blend of artist and assassin by giving him a quiet yet thoroughly persuasive voice. Gigante also deftly handles Silva's large, polyglot cast of arms dealers, terrorists, art dealers, wives, mistresses and even children. He does less well with the new Russian characters, Ivan and Elena, who speak with thick Russian accents, but use Anglicized pronunciations of their own names. Ivan sounds macho and threatening, but Elena is played with too much emotionalism, which detracts from the credibility of her decision to endanger her children and herself. Gigante's quick pace and narrative skill will keep listeners enthralled. A Putnam hardcover (Reviews, May 26 ). (July)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. In New York Times best-selling author Silva's eighth Gabriel Allon thriller (following The Secret Servant, an LJ Best Audiobook of 2007), the master Israeli spy and talented art restorer must stop a former KGB colonel-turned-wealthy capitalist from selling Russia's most sophisticated weapons to Middle Eastern terrorists. Reader Phil Gigante (The Secret Servant) does an excellent job with the dialog-heavy text, effectively using different accents to bring the international cast of characters to life. Highly recommended for public libraries. [Audio clip available through library.brillianceaudio.com; the Putnam hc, released in July, was a #1 New York Times best seller and received a starred review, LJ 7/08.—Ed.]—Ilka Gordon, formerly with Marcell Community Coll., Cleveland
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Gabriel Allon (Book 8)
  • Paperback: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Signet; Reprint edition (June 30, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451227387
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451227386
  • Product Dimensions: 4.3 x 1.2 x 7.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (589 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #32,399 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By L. Boswell VINE VOICE on April 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The middle book of my "Russia" trilogy (Child 44, this and then The Secret Life of Moscow), this happened to be my first Daniel Silva. While it follows a character--Gabriel--from his previous book and references some connections, characters and scenarios from it, I didn't find it difficult to follow Moscow Rules at all without having read the others.

Moscow Rules begins with Gabriel on holiday in Italy with his new wife. He's trying to get some downtime in after what was apparently a rather stressful experience from the last book, and is working diligently on restoring a painting for the Vatican. He gets an urgent call from his boss from the Israeli counter terrorism unit that a member of the much-oppressed Russian press has requested a meeting with Gabriel--and only Gabriel--to give him information about a possible impending attack on Israel and the U.S. They agree to meet, but the journalist is murdered before he can tell Gabriel anything, forcing Gabriel to travel to Russia to learn what the journalist died trying to tell him.

Although this is a spy novel, it's in no way a James Bond- or Jason Bourne-esque book--it's not about some superman taking down the world's biggest supervillians (or the world's biggest quasi-evil omnipresent secret government organizations, in the case of Bourne). It is a mystery thriller--although you learn fairly early on who the "villain" is, it takes most of the book to figure out what he's really planning--but Gabriel is no martial-arts gun-toting killing machine. It's much more a thinking man's game, and Gabriel is genuinely helped, not hindered, by his organization. The elaborate ruse set up to meet with the crime bosses' wife has that Thomas Crowne Affair/Ocean's Eleven type of feel to it, which I enjoy just as much as a good Bourne fight scene. Although I can't say how this book compares to his others, I can say it was entertaining enough to make me want to read more.
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Format: Hardcover
(4.5 stars) In his eighth Gabriel Allon espionage thriller, Daniel Silva moves from investigating the historical crimes of the past, often related to the Holocaust, and their effects on the present, to crimes of the present and their possibly catastrophic effects on the future. In this intense and absorbing novel about uncontrolled arms sales, the biggest threat to the future comes from Russian arms dealers, aided by Russia's president and former KGB operatives who are now unimaginably wealthy independent brokers and contractors. These arms merchants operate with impunity, selling all manner of weapons to terrorist organizations throughout the Middle East and Africa.

Gabriel Allon, formerly with the Israeli Mossad, is on his honeymoon in Italy when he is contacted by Ari Shamron, the grand old man of Israeli security. Allon, a trained art restorer, has been working for the Pope, but the recent assassination of a Russian journalist who may have had information he wanted to reveal to the West brings him out of retirement and back into action. When the murdered man's Russian editor-in-chief is also murdered, Allon travels to Russia, where he learns the name of a Russian arms dealer, Ivan Kharkov, who has been supplying Hezbollah, and who now appears close to selling sophisticated weapons to al-Quaeda.

Kharkov and his wife are collectors of Mary Cassatt paintings, and the fascinating art world which has added so much life to other Gabriel Allon thrillers in the past is also a major aspect of this novel. Art dealers, down-in-their-luck gentry who own prized artwork, and, in the case, of Allon, restorers, all play unexpectedly major roles in this effort to prevent Kharkov from selling advanced weapons to al-Quaeda.
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Format: Hardcover
I have read all of Daniel Silva's Gabriel Allon stories with great enjoyment but found that he has fallen into a formula approach with predictable plot elements that are pretty much the same from book to book. Substitute Russia for Saudi Arabia, one villain for another and it's pretty much the same story. The Vatican is always there, so is the damsel in distress, as is the obligatory scene where Allon is brutally beaten but survives. It is enjoyable but now very predictable and thus dissapointing.
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Format: Paperback
Kind of fun in its right wing way. Jews & Christians = good, Muslims = terrorists. He should have have offset things with a more positive Muslim figure ---- I've traveled some of the Islamic world, and Muslims are just human.

I finally took a sheet of paper to note holes in the plot. It starts in late December. An apparent a few weeks pass, the hero is in Saint Petersburg; it is White Nights. The book is has a lot of weirdnesses like that. A speaker of "fluent Russian" not knowing the meaning of the Russian word "silovik" is simply nonsensical, as is the AK 47 (the "47" means "1947") winning the war for the Soviets against the Germans ---- I don't know how much of a role the AK-whatever had in the Soviet win. The writing style was at times rather verbose, and I felt like it was pounded out in a hurry to make a quick buck, often thinking version of, "Why did you use ten words to say what could be said in six?" Thus could use a major, heavy application of "The Elements of Style."

While often improbable, if you want a fun quick beach read or something when stuck at the airport, I might recommend it. There are some truly good moments of humor between the gore, and I credit the author with brutal honesty about the criminal-ocracy now running Russia ---- when I traveled Russia, whenever I bought something I wondered, "Are a cut of these rubles going to a criminal organization?" It was also nice that he gave his far-right hero a certain artiness. Characters were nicely drawn; one came to "know" them, know what to expect.

But the ending had a feeling of "I'd better wrap this up quick" ---- too improbable, too tidy. I felt kicked off a cliff. The main baddie survives, doubtless to wreak havoc in the next novel.

Overall, a three-star.
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